Author Topic: Texas Pizza Summit  (Read 13982 times)

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Offline Mmmph

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit
« Reply #25 on: July 30, 2012, 01:11:25 PM »
Wow...Party time! Excellent!
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Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit
« Reply #26 on: July 30, 2012, 01:17:46 PM »
Craig,
Did you work your magic on any desert item?
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Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit
« Reply #27 on: July 30, 2012, 01:22:16 PM »
Absolutely fantastic!  I am insanely jealous over here.
Who designed the shirts?  Serious skillz.


I hired forum member pizzaneer (Brian) to take a vague idea that i had in my head and turn it into what you see.  It was great that he is into pizza, i didn't have to explain or re-explain things a hundred times, because he already knew.  He did a great job, sent me the file and I had the shirts printed here.  I am thinking of selling a few at cost + freight, if anyone is interested.  Send me a pm.

It was a great 3 days.  (I accidently showed up a day early, stupid me)Worth every second I spent there, especially the dough prep.  In the beginning of my pizza making, I though that I was underkneading.  Then with Chau's minimal kneading, i had decided that I was overkneading.  There are nine ways to skin a cat, but I got to see Craig's dough start to finish. (telling him that he was overkneading, and damaging the gluten.  Also that he was being to rough with the stretch and folds,  and that there was no possible way that it would be tender.) Yes, I was wrong. Pretty much invalueable, even if my dough is different.  I had been personally unable to use my GI Metal slotted peel to its ability, I think i've got it now.  I am over the fear of every launch being a calzone.  Kinda like one of those expensive pizza classes, except I didn't need an interpreter, and 'adult beverages' were being served.  I'll try to put some different pics up tonight.
« Last Edit: July 30, 2012, 01:23:51 PM by Jet_deck »
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit
« Reply #28 on: July 30, 2012, 01:23:30 PM »
I have not had that vintage, but I have had a very old Mouton before, but I am curious what everyone thought of the '88 Lynch Bages (the 85 Mouton is just a crazy bottle to bring....ditto for the Lynch Bages. Wow!) Was it perhaps the more pizza friendly of the two Left Bank Bordeaux on the table?

Kelly,

I would say that all of the wines we tried, including the Italian wine that Bill brought with him, went well with the pizzas, although Tom went heavier with the beers. I had originally planned to bring a 1989 Lynch Bages. That wine has scored better than the 1988s--and is reflected in the doubling of price. However, for some reason, I mistakenly picked the 1988, of which I have several bottles. I was afraid that I was going to have to start drinking the 1988s more but the bottle we had showed me that there is still a lot of life left in the 1988s. I think that my family and I drank most of the 1989s because they are so good. Once the weather turns cool again, I plan to review all of my collection and organize them better. If I do that now, it can take too long to cool off the bottles again. I'm hoping that I still have some of the Lynch Bages 1989s left.

Craig told me that he preferred the 1987 Clos du Val Reserve over the 1988 Lynch Bages. I had also brought a recent Joseph Phelps wine and an inexpensive, yet pleasant, Joel Gott cabernet, but it is hard for those wines to compete with the old wines. That was actually one of the reasons why I brought the Joseph Phelps and Gott wines--to compare them with the other styles and vintages.

I might add that I had also originally intended to bring a 1988 Mouton Rothschild to the Summit. However, the tasting notes were better for the 1985 Mouton. But, as you know, that doesn't always translate into lower prices. The mere fact that a wine is a first-growth wine, along with limited supply, is enough to elevate prices. That has always posed a dilemma. What do you do with a wine that you paid say, $50 for and now sells for $500-1000? Do you sell it (and mine have had good provenance), leave it to your heirs, or just drink it?

Peter

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit
« Reply #29 on: July 30, 2012, 01:34:37 PM »
Peter, if I may ask, in what fashion are you storing your wines?

Kelly,

I have a Vinotheque wine storage unit. Last year, I had to replace the guts of the unit but was able to use the same box with a little modification. The new unit is a WhisperKOOL unit that is made by Vinotheque. I keep the temperature at around 56-57 degrees F. The box can hold up to 300 bottles if I recall correctly. I no longer buy the futures because they can take forever to reach the peak point of drinkability. Also, because of the Chinese, Japanese and others who are coming into great wealth, the prices for the new futures have skyrocketed. For example, for the 2009 Mouton Rothschild, which is the current release according to Craig, the current pricetag (average) is about $1,157 per bottle.

Peter

Offline ringkingpin

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit
« Reply #30 on: July 30, 2012, 02:42:17 PM »
Hey that looks like a lot of FUN!  Great looking pies and I can tell that you guys were having a blast.  I'm jealous!

I'm not sure if I would have transported that wine and drank it the same day but I appreciate your enthusiasm.  I :heart: Lynch Bages!  It's an amazing wine and it always cracks me up that it's considered a 5th growth.  I have a hard time thinking of any Bordeaux's that are as consistent as the Lynch Bages are. 

Pete'za if you're going to go through your inventory, you might consider doing what I do and barcode (or not) but maintain your inventory on www.cellartracker.com

I think your estimates on the pricing are a little off.  I buy most of my collectible wine through auction and I have a little process for it where I go to www.winesearcher.com and see what it's going for and then figure out how much I'm willing to pay including the premium.

Here is the wine searcher results for the '85.  I'm curious, did you bring it over that day and open it or was it there for a few on end or what?
http://www.wine-searcher.com/find/mouton+rothchild/1985/usa

The 09's are hovering around 1k a pop but I like to buy wines that come with a provenance, not just from wine stores
http://www.wine-searcher.com/find/mouton+rothchild/2009/usa


funny enough, I was at a wine dinner last week, an annual party of sorts a friend hosts where we do a pot luck of sorts and open oddballs and bin ends.  I was asked (due to popular demand after last year?) to bring my pizza oven so I packed up my 2stone and brought 32 balls of naturally leavened dough.  There were many, many great wines that I enjoyed.  Out of the whites, there were two chablis that stood out, an 05 Raveneau and an 08 Dauvissat.  For the reds, there were so many great wines to choose from...

Here I am buddying up to an Imperial of 1964 Pavie (6 liters!)

It's always fun to have some 100+ year old swill.

Call me next time, I'll make the flight and bring some juice and cigars!!!
"Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you who you are."
 Brillat-Savarin

Offline PizzaPolice

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit
« Reply #31 on: July 30, 2012, 03:11:48 PM »
OK, kid.  Now you are just showing off.

Seriously, Geoff, we should think of doing something like that around these parts.  Other than Willard, who lives in this area?

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit
« Reply #32 on: July 30, 2012, 03:25:27 PM »
ringkingpin,

The Texas Summit at Craig's place was for only two days. I flew in on Saturday and arrived at Craig's place at around 1 PM. We drank the two Bordeaux's around 6 PM or so, when Craig started making the pizzas. The other wines I brought were drunk the next day (Sunday). My practice when drinking the old wines is to sample them upon opening. If they are fine, I just drink from there. Sometimes I will just let the bottle sit opened for a while or else decanter it. Craig has several wine decanters, one of which he used for the two Bordeaux's. 

I always use the wine-searcher tool except that I exclude auction wines so that the prices only reflect retail level wine prices.

I told Tom that going through my wine box can be an interesting experience since I never know what I am going to find. For example, I had completely forgotten the 1985 Mouton because I only had one bottle of it. I also stumbled across a 1984 Heitz Martha's Vineyard cab. It most likely is past its prime at the moment, and its price has declined to a low of $184 a bottle, but that was a super wine in its day. Tom mentioned that there were online resources for keeping track of wines. There is some merit to using something like that. I'm sure that I have some wines that need to be drunk fairly soon if the wine-searcher's "drink-by-dates" are to be believed.

As you might imagine, there was a lot of discussion of the wines. In my experience, that is usually what happens when you roll out the really good old stuff.

Peter

Offline ringkingpin

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit
« Reply #33 on: July 30, 2012, 03:31:42 PM »
OK, kid.  Now you are just showing off.

Seriously, Geoff, we should think of doing something like that around these parts.  Other than Willard, who lives in this area?

I know we should!  Lets do this!
"Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you who you are."
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Offline ringkingpin

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit
« Reply #34 on: July 30, 2012, 03:59:31 PM »
ringkingpin,

The Texas Summit at Craig's place was for only two days. I flew in on Saturday and arrived at Craig's place at around 1 PM. We drank the two Bordeaux's around 6 PM or so, when Craig started making the pizzas. The other wines I brought were drunk the next day (Sunday). My practice when drinking the old wines is to sample them upon opening. If they are fine, I just drink from there. Sometimes I will just let the bottle sit opened for a while or else decanter it. Craig has several wine decanters, one of which he used for the two Bordeaux's. 

I always use the wine-searcher tool except that I exclude auction wines so that the prices only reflect retail level wine prices.

I told Tom that going through my wine box can be an interesting experience since I never know what I am going to find. For example, I had completely forgotten the 1985 Mouton because I only had one bottle of it. I also stumbled across a 1984 Heitz Martha's Vineyard cab. It most likely is past its prime at the moment, and its price has declined to a low of $184 a bottle, but that was a super wine in its day. Tom mentioned that there were online resources for keeping track of wines. There is some merit to using something like that. I'm sure that I have some wines that need to be drunk fairly soon if the wine-searcher's "drink-by-dates" are to be believed.

As you might imagine, there was a lot of discussion of the wines. In my experience, that is usually what happens when you roll out the really good old stuff.

Peter

I decant for one of two reasons, to aerate the wine if it's a little green or two get the sediment out.  I find that the sediment in old Burgs is fine to drink while the stuff in old Bordeaux's for whatever reason is like bitter mud.  I'm not sure why this is the case, but it is and most wine drinkers tend to agree.  I guess for me there is a third reason to decant too and that is with older whites. I find that if I decant an older white burg, the "funk" odor often blows off.  I have a variety of different decanters for different purposes.  I some some tall, narrow ones that are great for decanting for sediment and others that are very flat bottomed to help speed up the aging by giving the wine as much surface area as possible. 
If I have the luxury of planning ahead, I'll put an older Bordeaux on end for a week or two allowing the just to all float down to the bottom and then you can handle it pretty easily.  More times than not, I'm just pulling a wine out of the cellar and I treat it like nitro glycerin and keep it in a wine basket nearly vertical until I'm done decanting.  I don't pour it through a filter or a cheese cloth, just hold a light behind the bottle neck.  I have a special champagne flute that tapers down to nearly a needle point in which I pour my last bit of the wine including the sediment in.  By the time I've finished that, I'm usually able to pull another ounce or so out of that flute with all of the sediment totally separated from the good juice.  Just different things I've learned after drinking a lot of good wine.

Wine Searcher, I agree, don't look at the auction prices on wine searcher but it is a good resource!  I'm not even sure if they include the premium for the auctions on wine searcher.  I know when auction houses brag about how much they sold wine for, they include the buyers premium, I'm not sure if that's good practice or not. 

Cellar Tracker, you of all people would get a kick out of it.  You can slice and dice the info anyway you please.  I have so many bottles that it really helps keep me organized and helps me avoid falling asleep at the switch; nothing worse than opening a great bottle which should have been consumed years ago.  I keep most of my wine in a wine storage facility in the city and I pull almost exclusively from drinking ranges from Cellar Tracker and other sources such as burghound. 

"Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you who you are."
 Brillat-Savarin

Offline SinoChef

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit
« Reply #35 on: July 30, 2012, 04:42:59 PM »
My heart is warmed. Nothing better then sitting around with a group of your peers, enjoying what you love to do.

Offline ringkingpin

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit
« Reply #36 on: July 30, 2012, 04:48:50 PM »
No doubt Sino!  The one picture of everyone drunk fat and happy, kicking back pretty much sums up what this is all about!
"Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you who you are."
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Offline SinoChef

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit
« Reply #37 on: July 30, 2012, 05:20:03 PM »
Quote
everyone drunk fat and happy, kicking back pretty much sums up

It's just that relaxed environment. When you are sitting with pros, bickering about absolute minutiae.

And some one says, "well i was saving this bottle of X for when my 3 year old daughter gets married. Buut as long as we are all here......"

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit
« Reply #38 on: July 30, 2012, 05:29:23 PM »
It's just that relaxed environment.

It was very relaxed. Very fun.

Pizza brought us together, but it was much more than that. The whole was more than the sum of the parts.
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Re: Texas Pizza Summit
« Reply #39 on: July 30, 2012, 06:49:48 PM »
I'm confused about something. Is this a pizza forum or a wine forum?  ;D

Seriously, though, WHAT an event!   Such a visible sense of comradery and rapport.  If you could bottle some of that, I think people would pay well more than a 1000 bucks a bottle for it. That's priceless.

Craig, were you nervous at all about cooking for the 'big guns'? Am I missing something, but is 63% hydration new? Are you trying to chase some of that Cane texture?  And, if so, did you succeed? I didn't mention it in the Cane thread, buy in my experience, as the water increases, generally speaking, the tenderness decreases.

Peter, where are you on Neapolitan pizza?  Ready to go WFO shopping?  ;D

Gene, is this your first time tasting Craig's pies? How do they compare to the other Neapolitan places you've been to? Does their vastly superior appearance translate into a vastly superior taste?


Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit
« Reply #40 on: July 30, 2012, 07:38:20 PM »
Well, I'll answer for me.  I am not a Neapolitan guy, and his pizzas were freakishly good. I mean good that transcends style, it stands alone as a wonderful food. The mushroom was my favorite, followed by the sausage/rabe pie.

Offline Jet_deck

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit
« Reply #41 on: July 30, 2012, 07:43:47 PM »
Gene, is this your first time tasting Craig's pies? How do they compare to the other Neapolitan places you've been to? Does their vastly superior appearance translate into a vastly superior taste?
Yes.
As my taste evolves, I consider Neapolitan probably the most difficult to "reproduce" "properly".  There is just to much to it from beginning to end. It is not magic, it is just a style.  I don't really associate appearance and taste. (in a strict sense)  You could make a crappy looking pizza that taste pretty good, and a beautiful pizza that taste crappy.  Put them both together and you have something above the norm.

Even though I am new to Neo. and making pizza; I would put Craig's pizza up against anything that I have had.(Not in a production mode, but taste for taste) it is just simply good.  I think we had 3 new creations, they were very tasty, also. :chef:
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Offline Ev

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit
« Reply #42 on: July 30, 2012, 07:55:08 PM »
I thought about the summit a couple times this weekend.
Man!, I wish I could have been there. :'(
I'm honored at least to have been invited. :D

Offline pizzaneer

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit
« Reply #43 on: July 30, 2012, 08:13:26 PM »
I'm honored to have been asked to do the design for the shirts, as well as be invited.  I'm happy with how the design came out, and proud to have been a (distant) part of the event.

Hey Ev, if we can't make it next year either, how would you feel about hosting the Midatlantic Pizza Summit?  Need a WFO and someone who can make it sing, and you're the guy around here!

Only change I'd request is that it take place during the fall - better camping and WFO weather!
« Last Edit: July 30, 2012, 08:17:32 PM by pizzaneer »
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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit
« Reply #44 on: July 30, 2012, 08:24:26 PM »

Craig, were you nervous at all about cooking for the 'big guns'? Am I missing something, but is 63% hydration new? Are you trying to chase some of that Cane texture?  And, if so, did you succeed? I didn't mention it in the Cane thread, buy in my experience, as the water increases, generally speaking, the tenderness decreases.


I was a bit anxious in the days before, but by the time I started baking I was in the groove. The dough looked good, and the oven was HOT, so I knew I was in good shape.

63% is new, and yes, my lunch at Cane Rosso did inspire me to push it up a touch (Id been at 61.5%).  I did 63% last weekend and I liked it, so I made it again for the Summit. It was very tender. On further reflection, I think my crust is as tender as Jays. What is different is I have a thin crispy shell where his really didnt. Again, very different crusts both very good.

CL
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit
« Reply #45 on: July 30, 2012, 08:25:03 PM »
You guys are all too kind.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit
« Reply #46 on: July 30, 2012, 08:28:51 PM »
I'm honored to have been asked to do the design for the shirts, as well as be invited.  I'm happy with how the design came out, and proud to have been a (distant) part of the event.

Hey Ev, if we can't make it next year either, how would you feel about hosting the Midatlantic Pizza Summit?  Need a WFO and someone who can make it sing, and you're the guy around here!

Only change I'd request is that it take place during the fall - better camping and WFO weather!


You did a great job on the shirt! Thank you!
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit
« Reply #47 on: July 30, 2012, 08:42:33 PM »
Peter, where are you on Neapolitan pizza?  Ready to go WFO shopping?  ;D

scott123,

I live in a zero lot line neighborhood where back yards are very small. It is also possible that the association would not permit a wood fired oven. I almost never see any of my neighbors doing even the most basic backyard grilling, although I am pretty certain that there are no restrictions against it. Maybe it is because most of my neighbors are single working people or retirees. And no children.

I thought that Craig did a masterful job of making the Neapolitan pizzas, and he did it effortlessly. The pizzas themselves were truly outstanding. It would be easy to fall in love with Craig's pizzas. They are almost like a new food group.

Peter

Offline pizzablogger

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit
« Reply #48 on: July 30, 2012, 09:18:33 PM »
It would be easy to fall in love with Craig's pizzas. They are almost like a new food group

Just. Wow.

I need a drool towel. -k
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Offline JConk007

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Re: Texas Pizza Summit
« Reply #49 on: July 30, 2012, 10:12:45 PM »
I'll secong the WOW!! and The Jealousy factor is quite high as well!! The Garage is now  on my Bucket list !  ;D The wines!  fuggetaboutit! worth a ticket for sure . Wish I could have been there. I will be  out in Salt lake end of August for a full week  if anyone has an itching for a " great salt lake summit " just let me know. The pies look Fantastic as allways and I am also wiping up the drool also Kelly! Nice gig guys!!
John
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