Author Topic: Finally got around to trying this as bench flour  (Read 421 times)

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Offline ringkingpin

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Finally got around to trying this as bench flour
« on: July 13, 2016, 10:36:48 AM »
About four years ago, I was watching Pepe Franco at Spacca Napoli work his magic as guest chef.  A true master!  I was able to communicate pretty well with him, me speaking French, him responding in Italian.  I didn't want to bug him too much but really enjoyed watching him crank it out.  It made me wonder how many Pizzas he's made in his life, 100,000, 1,000,000?  Anyhow, I noticed that his bench flour looked a little different.  It turns out that he was using extra fine 00 corn meal.  I was always under the impression that any corn meal would burn at these temps and he said, not extra fine and just as long as you use the right amount.  He then went on to explain the reason he liked using it was because he can prep multiple pizzas and let them sit on the corn meal and the corn meal doesn't absorb moisture.  So, for years, I've been intrigued with trying this out.  I finally got around to finding some extra fine corn meal from Halls, down in GA I think and ordered a couple of pounds.  After doing three or four bakes with it, I can say with certainty that it's a pleasure to work with.  It doesn't burn and you CAN let a pizza sit for a really long time and it won't absorb the corn meal.  Has anyone else tried extra fine corn meal as bench flour?  If you find yourself prepping multiple pizzas at the same time, I recommend trying it out.  Please report your findings here if you do!



https://halls-milling-company.myshopify.com/products/fine-stond-ground-cornmeal
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 Brillat-Savarin

Online mitchjg

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Re: Finally got around to trying this as bench flour
« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2016, 11:01:20 AM »
Very interesting.  At what temperature are you baking?  - Curious if it burns in a high temp WFO or not.
Mitch

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Offline ringkingpin

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Re: Finally got around to trying this as bench flour
« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2016, 11:45:33 AM »
Very interesting.  At what temperature are you baking?  - Curious if it burns in a high temp WFO or not.

I'm cooking in the neighborhood of 850 degrees, give or take 30 degrees...

It doesn't seem to burn anymore than 00 flour does.  If you throw a handful in the oven, it'll burn like anything but if you use the proper amount, it seems to do just fine.
"Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you who you are."
 Brillat-Savarin

Offline parallei

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Re: Finally got around to trying this as bench flour
« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2016, 12:06:49 PM »
Thanks for the info RKP.  I'll give it a try.  I'm I correct in assuming that when you say one can let the prepped pizza sit for awhile, you mean a fully topped pizza, not just the stretched skin?

Online invertedisdead

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Re: Finally got around to trying this as bench flour
« Reply #4 on: July 13, 2016, 01:35:36 PM »
Interesting pizza and stretch technique!
Ryan

Offline thezaman

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Re: Finally got around to trying this as bench flour
« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2016, 08:11:30 PM »
you might be seeing very fine ground semolina. a lot of pizzerias use it as it falls off of the crust.