Author Topic: My Neapolitan bake in my blackstone - Long Island  (Read 283 times)

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Offline 3pedals

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My Neapolitan bake in my blackstone - Long Island
« on: April 18, 2015, 05:10:30 PM »
So I have had a blackstone at home (along with a kettlepizza) and blackstone at work as for the past few months, I have made a few pies in the one at work but today I feel I was finally able to do a true Neopolitan at home. I didn't have time to use my Sour Dough starter and do a 48hr ferment, so I used used this quick dough recipe

500gr Caputo pizzeria 00 flour
325gr water (65% hydration)
10gr salt
3gr active dry yeast

I didn't kneed it for as long as I usually do in the KA, and when I took it out of the mixer I just do a few folds and balled it up, I must say the dough stretched out much easier than it has in the past, and was able to stretch it all by hand very easily, Would this be a sign of the dough being under-kneeded? Hour Bulk rise, and about an hour balled rise (300g per ball)

For the ingredients:

Sauce: Was made with D.O.P San Marzano tomatoes, discarded the basil leafs and drained the liquid, put through a food mill with the medium plate, added a little salt, and very little cracked pepper to off-set the acidity. 

Cheese: Mozzarella Di Bufala from restaurant depot, not sure how many grams the ball I used was.

Basil: Although I usually leave the basil leafs whole, I just bought an herb scissor that I wanted to try so it was finely shredded.

Extra Virgin Olive Oil- Brand was EDDA which I bought a few weeks ago from a store on Arthur Ave in the bronx, although I forgot to take a picture after I drizzled it on the pie.

With all that being said, I hope to use my sour dough starter next time. Friday night is pizza night at work, and I would love to use it then, but temperature control is an issue for the 48 hour ferment, does anyone have an experience with using the starter with a 3-4 hour dough rise, something I can make at work and have it rise at room temperature?


Also.. I hope to purchase a wood fired oven in the next week or so, I have been torn between the pizza party and a forno bravo, I like the cost of the Pizza Party, but I love that forno bravo is more of a traditional brick oven. I am open to recommendations.

Also, would love to hear tips or pointers or constructive criticism about my pizza!

Till Next time!
« Last Edit: April 18, 2015, 05:17:15 PM by 3pedals »


Online JD

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Re: My Neapolitan bake in my blackstone - Long Island
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2015, 05:54:23 PM »
So I have had a blackstone at home (along with a kettlepizza) and blackstone at work as for the past few months, I have made a few pies in the one at work but today I feel I was finally able to do a true Neopolitan at home. I didn't have time to use my Sour Dough starter and do a 48hr ferment, so I used used this quick dough recipe

500gr Caputo pizzeria 00 flour
325gr water (65% hydration)
10gr salt
3gr active dry yeast

I didn't kneed it for as long as I usually do in the KA, and when I took it out of the mixer I just do a few folds and balled it up, I must say the dough stretched out much easier than it has in the past, and was able to stretch it all by hand very easily, Would this be a sign of the dough being under-kneeded? Hour Bulk rise, and about an hour balled rise (300g per ball)

For the ingredients:

Sauce: Was made with D.O.P San Marzano tomatoes, discarded the basil leafs and drained the liquid, put through a food mill with the medium plate, added a little salt, and very little cracked pepper to off-set the acidity. 

Cheese: Mozzarella Di Bufala from restaurant depot, not sure how many grams the ball I used was.

Basil: Although I usually leave the basil leafs whole, I just bought an herb scissor that I wanted to try so it was finely shredded.

Extra Virgin Olive Oil- Brand was EDDA which I bought a few weeks ago from a store on Arthur Ave in the bronx, although I forgot to take a picture after I drizzled it on the pie.

With all that being said, I hope to use my sour dough starter next time. Friday night is pizza night at work, and I would love to use it then, but temperature control is an issue for the 48 hour ferment, does anyone have an experience with using the starter with a 3-4 hour dough rise, something I can make at work and have it rise at room temperature?


Also.. I hope to purchase a wood fired oven in the next week or so, I have been torn between the pizza party and a forno bravo, I like the cost of the Pizza Party, but I love that forno bravo is more of a traditional brick oven. I am open to recommendations.

Also, would love to hear tips or pointers or constructive criticism about my pizza!

Till Next time!

I'd like to know where you work so I can apply  ;D  Just kidding, but I am moving back to Long Island in 3 weeks so I might have to bother you about where you get supplies.

There is a lot to consider when buying a WFO. I'll be bringing my pizza party to the beach this summer as well as friends/family houses all year. If you like the idea of portability in your WFO than a pizza party should be a consideration.

I think your pizza looks good and look forward to seeing the sourdough version.

Offline dylandylan

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Re: My Neapolitan bake in my blackstone - Long Island
« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2015, 11:49:41 PM »
......temperature control is an issue for the 48 hour ferment, does anyone have an experience with using the starter with a 3-4 hour dough rise, something I can make at work and have it rise at room temperature?

That may be tricky.  Sourdough can act quickly, but to get a dough happening in 3-4 hours would require a huge amount of sourdough.  Most of us are using 2% sourdough starter or less (some may use a little more) and let time do the work.  If you shorten the time to 3-4 hours I expect you're going to have to use a boatload of sourdough - could be something like 50% of your dough might be starter.  Technically you may be able to get a dough to work, but it won't be anything like neapolitan dough.

Why not start your dough on Wednesday just before you leave work?  That way you can get 48 hours fermentation with a regular amount of starter.

I've done stranger things...

Offline mkevenson

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Re: My Neapolitan bake in my blackstone - Long Island
« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2015, 11:38:45 AM »
3pedals, your pizza looks good enough to eat! Not a criticism but something to try, use a bit less mozz, spread a bit further apart. This gives a nice visual and should not affect the taste. I might also suggest using the whole basil leaf, perhaps torn in half if large, rather than cut small.

As far as ovens, I wrestled with the exact same questions before I purchased my WFO. I chose the PP for many reasons, cost, ease of set up, portability, amount of wood needed for each bake, preheat time, and it does a nice job.
Either way you go will be great, just depends on your bottom line.

Mark
"Gettin' better all the time" Beatles