Author Topic: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage  (Read 40977 times)

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Offline HAMnEGGr

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #140 on: June 12, 2013, 09:15:13 PM »
Thanks!  btw, why is cold fermentation integral to NY Pizza but no no for Neapolitan?  More yeast in NY so have to slow it down a bit?



Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #141 on: June 12, 2013, 09:25:38 PM »
Thanks!  btw, why is cold fermentation integral to NY Pizza but no no for Neapolitan?  More yeast in NY so have to slow it down a bit?

Cold fermenting is probably integral to NY-style because it is much easier and has a much larger margin of error.

I personally wouldn't use cold fermenting for NY or any other dough for that matter. I don't like cold fermenting period. I don't think it develops as much flavor, and I think it has a negative impact on texture.
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Online Chicago Bob

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #142 on: June 12, 2013, 09:53:59 PM »
Before your WFO; when you were working with your modded grill, did you ever create any non-00 flour doughs that were non refrigerated, and to your liking? If so would you mind providing a quick link Craig (not wanting to derail here) Thank you.

Bob
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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #143 on: June 12, 2013, 10:33:50 PM »
Before your WFO; when you were working with your modded grill, did you ever create any non-00 flour doughs that were non refrigerated, and to your liking? If so would you mind providing a quick link Craig (not wanting to derail here) Thank you.

Bob


Yes, all I used was KAAP. Fermentation was 24 +/- hours in the mid to upper 70's.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12371.msg117401.html#msg117401
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,13475.msg133735.html#msg133735
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,13869.msg139376.html#msg139376
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,13775.msg138319.html#msg138319

My Reverse UPN thread called for fermentation in the low 60's. http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,10237.msg89810.html#msg89810

CL
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Online Chicago Bob

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Offline sub

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #145 on: June 26, 2013, 01:07:03 AM »
Hi Craig,

I use (for now) Fresh Brewer's Yeast, how do you know if you've put enough in the dough ?

From the Little bubbles popping in the bulk, activity under the balls or from the rise of the crust ?

Thanks  ;)

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #146 on: June 26, 2013, 09:11:22 AM »
I mostly go by the look of the bubble structure and size on the bottom side of the ball. Of course this is only possible if you have your dough in something clear.
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline red kiosk

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #147 on: July 11, 2013, 11:38:40 AM »
Hi Craig,

I going to give your Neapolitan dough recipe a go with the Blackstone next week and have a question. My recently purchased Ischia sourdough culture won't be ready by then, but I do have a well-established Camaldoli. Can I just switch them out (same %) or are there some tweaks you recommend when using the Camaldoli in your recipe? Thanks in advance for any help with this. Take care!

Jim
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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #148 on: July 15, 2013, 11:48:37 AM »
Hi Craig,

I going to give your Neapolitan dough recipe a go with the Blackstone next week and have a question. My recently purchased Ischia sourdough culture won't be ready by then, but I do have a well-established Camaldoli. Can I just switch them out (same %) or are there some tweaks you recommend when using the Camaldoli in your recipe? Thanks in advance for any help with this. Take care!

Jim

My guess is that you can probably swap them without any other changes.
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline red kiosk

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #149 on: July 15, 2013, 01:05:52 PM »
Craig,

Thanks a bunch, that'll be the plan then. Ischia will be ready in another week and I plan to do side-by-side, double batch comparison to see which one I prefer. Right now, I'm jones'n to make some NP pies with sourdough starter on the new Blackstone. Thanks again and take care!

Jim
The pathologically precise are annoying, but right!


Offline pacdunes

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #150 on: August 23, 2013, 09:16:20 AM »
Craig,
thank you for sharing the information.  Your process makes the best dough.  I had 1 question - do you have an emergency formula for same day or next day use?  Thanks!

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #151 on: August 23, 2013, 11:30:01 AM »
Craig,
thank you for sharing the information.  Your process makes the best dough.  I had 1 question - do you have an emergency formula for same day or next day use?  Thanks!


I can't remember the last time I did less than 48 hours with the method, but the fermentation time can easily be adjusted with this chart: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,22649.0.html
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline pacdunes

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #152 on: August 23, 2013, 11:50:05 AM »
awesome!  thank you

Offline pacdunes

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #153 on: September 05, 2013, 01:38:16 PM »
Craig - I ball my dough into the tupperware.  Do you turn the container upside down and let it drop into flour? or Do you scoop it out with your fingers?

Then you start working it from the middle?  How do I maintain as many air pockets in the crust as possible?  I think I'm mishandling my dough from the Tupperware.  It has a lot of great bubble structure in the container.  Thanks

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #154 on: September 05, 2013, 03:17:38 PM »
Craig - I ball my dough into the tupperware.  Do you turn the container upside down and let it drop into flour? or Do you scoop it out with your fingers?

Then you start working it from the middle?  How do I maintain as many air pockets in the crust as possible?  I think I'm mishandling my dough from the Tupperware.  It has a lot of great bubble structure in the container.  Thanks

I lightly oil the inside of the container before putting the ball in, and then let then I just let it fall out all by itself. The longer you let the ball rise in the container, the longer it takes to come out. After 24 hours, it will take a few seconds. Don't be tempted to pull it out. That would mess up your cornice for sure.

Open the ball as I describe in the first post in the thread. Be gentile and take your time until you get a feel for it. The cornice is the only place you're really worried about maintaining the bubble structure - just don't touch it. 
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline pacdunes

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #155 on: September 05, 2013, 06:52:03 PM »
thanks Craig - not sure I could do this without all your input here!

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #156 on: September 05, 2013, 07:12:08 PM »
It's all about experimenting to see what works for you and practice. I'm glad I can help with a starting point.

I'm excited to see your pies.

I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline pacdunes

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #157 on: September 06, 2013, 12:01:03 PM »
Here you go - this was a good result.  Not nearly as beautiful as your pies, but I'll have to learn less is more - I plan to reduce the amt of cheese and let the ingredients shine!

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,25127.msg277297.html#msg277297

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #158 on: September 06, 2013, 02:27:53 PM »
Here you go - this was a good result.  Not nearly as beautiful as your pies, but I'll have to learn less is more - I plan to reduce the amt of cheese and let the ingredients shine!

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,25127.msg277297.html#msg277297


I think they look great!
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline mbrulato

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #159 on: November 20, 2013, 11:07:10 AM »
The culture is wet, and most importantly, fully active. I time the feeding so that the activity peaks right about when I need it.

Craig,

As you've read  >:D, I'm in the process of activating an Ischia culture.  Hopefully by next week, I'll be able to try making a NP dough.  I have a question as it relates to your NP dough, do you go through a culture proof as described in Ed Wood's Classic Sourdoughs book?  Or do you just use the activated starter because it always sits on your counter at RT?  I find this book so far to be a little confusing, maybe it's because it's primarily geared towards bread making versus pizza making.  Not sure if there's a difference in treatment of the two...

Thank you,
Mary Ann
Mary Ann


 

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