Author Topic: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage  (Read 82627 times)

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Offline pacdunes

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #150 on: August 23, 2013, 09:16:20 AM »
Craig,
thank you for sharing the information.  Your process makes the best dough.  I had 1 question - do you have an emergency formula for same day or next day use?  Thanks!


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #151 on: August 23, 2013, 11:30:01 AM »
Craig,
thank you for sharing the information.  Your process makes the best dough.  I had 1 question - do you have an emergency formula for same day or next day use?  Thanks!

I can't remember the last time I did less than 48 hours with the method, but the fermentation time can easily be adjusted with this chart: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,22649.0.html
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
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Offline pacdunes

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #152 on: August 23, 2013, 11:50:05 AM »
awesome!  thank you

Offline pacdunes

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #153 on: September 05, 2013, 01:38:16 PM »
Craig - I ball my dough into the tupperware.  Do you turn the container upside down and let it drop into flour? or Do you scoop it out with your fingers?

Then you start working it from the middle?  How do I maintain as many air pockets in the crust as possible?  I think I'm mishandling my dough from the Tupperware.  It has a lot of great bubble structure in the container.  Thanks

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #154 on: September 05, 2013, 03:17:38 PM »
Craig - I ball my dough into the tupperware.  Do you turn the container upside down and let it drop into flour? or Do you scoop it out with your fingers?

Then you start working it from the middle?  How do I maintain as many air pockets in the crust as possible?  I think I'm mishandling my dough from the Tupperware.  It has a lot of great bubble structure in the container.  Thanks

I lightly oil the inside of the container before putting the ball in, and then let then I just let it fall out all by itself. The longer you let the ball rise in the container, the longer it takes to come out. After 24 hours, it will take a few seconds. Don't be tempted to pull it out. That would mess up your cornice for sure.

Open the ball as I describe in the first post in the thread. Be gentile and take your time until you get a feel for it. The cornice is the only place you're really worried about maintaining the bubble structure - just don't touch it. 
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
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Offline pacdunes

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #155 on: September 05, 2013, 06:52:03 PM »
thanks Craig - not sure I could do this without all your input here!

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #156 on: September 05, 2013, 07:12:08 PM »
It's all about experimenting to see what works for you and practice. I'm glad I can help with a starting point.

I'm excited to see your pies.

"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline pacdunes

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #157 on: September 06, 2013, 12:01:03 PM »
Here you go - this was a good result.  Not nearly as beautiful as your pies, but I'll have to learn less is more - I plan to reduce the amt of cheese and let the ingredients shine!

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,25127.msg277297.html#msg277297

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #158 on: September 06, 2013, 02:27:53 PM »
Here you go - this was a good result.  Not nearly as beautiful as your pies, but I'll have to learn less is more - I plan to reduce the amt of cheese and let the ingredients shine!

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,25127.msg277297.html#msg277297

I think they look great!
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage


Offline mbrulato

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #159 on: November 20, 2013, 11:07:10 AM »
The culture is wet, and most importantly, fully active. I time the feeding so that the activity peaks right about when I need it.

Craig,

As you've read  >:D, I'm in the process of activating an Ischia culture.  Hopefully by next week, I'll be able to try making a NP dough.  I have a question as it relates to your NP dough, do you go through a culture proof as described in Ed Wood's Classic Sourdoughs book?  Or do you just use the activated starter because it always sits on your counter at RT?  I find this book so far to be a little confusing, maybe it's because it's primarily geared towards bread making versus pizza making.  Not sure if there's a difference in treatment of the two...

Thank you,
Mary Ann
Mary Ann

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #160 on: November 20, 2013, 11:53:36 AM »
Craig,

As you've read  >:D, I'm in the process of activating an Ischia culture.  Hopefully by next week, I'll be able to try making a NP dough.  I have a question as it relates to your NP dough, do you go through a culture proof as described in Ed Wood's Classic Sourdoughs book?  Or do you just use the activated starter because it always sits on your counter at RT?  I find this book so far to be a little confusing, maybe it's because it's primarily geared towards bread making versus pizza making.  Not sure if there's a difference in treatment of the two...

Thank you,
Mary Ann

No, I don't do it like he suggests. From what I remember about his method, it's more like bread making than pizza making.

I simply get it good an active at room temp and use what I need from that.

CL
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline mbrulato

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #161 on: November 20, 2013, 01:02:23 PM »
No, I don't do it like he suggests. From what I remember about his method, it's more like bread making than pizza making.

I simply get it good an active at room temp and use what I need from that.

CL

Thanks.  I just checked the temperature in my basement.  It's a perfect 65 degrees.  That's where I'll be fermenting my dough.  How many dough balls do you suggest I try for the first round?

I need to move my steel plates closer to the broiler to attempt a NP-ish bake time.  I've experimented with temps a few weeks ago and it seems I can get the steel plates over 650, probably higher if I let the broiler hit it for longer than 20 minutes.  Then I'll use the broiler for the whole bake to get top crust color.

If my starter is fully activated in the next day or two, I'll be able to try the pies on Sunday.  I might have a bunch more questions for you.  I apologize in advance to be a PITA   ::)

Mary Ann
Mary Ann

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #162 on: November 20, 2013, 01:35:04 PM »
You're not a PITA.

Dough is pretty cheap. I'd make at least 5 even if I thought I wouldn't bake all of them. I don't like working with a tiny little mass of dough (2-3 balls).

What kind of flour are you going to use?
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline mbrulato

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #163 on: November 20, 2013, 01:36:28 PM »
For NP I would use the Caputo pizzeria.  I keep it on hand for homemade pasta and some times blend with other flours for ciabatta.
Mary Ann

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #164 on: November 20, 2013, 02:25:55 PM »
I look forward to the pies!
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline mbrulato

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #165 on: November 20, 2013, 04:32:27 PM »
If I bulk ferment in a large covered bowl in the basement at 65F for 24 hours, then ball and place into individual containers or a dough tray for the next 24 hours, how many hours do you recommend that I keep the dough on the kitchen counter (approximately 70F) before I open it up?
Mary Ann

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #166 on: November 20, 2013, 04:50:45 PM »
If I bulk ferment in a large covered bowl in the basement at 65F for 24 hours, then ball and place into individual containers or a dough tray for the next 24 hours, how many hours do you recommend that I keep the dough on the kitchen counter (approximately 70F) before I open it up?

If all your fermentation is at 65F. It's not necessary to being it to 70F (or higher) unless you need to do so to speed thing up some. I'd suggest watching the last 12 hours. It will take a few times to learn what to look for in terms of the dough progressing as you would like. With 8 hours to go, if it doesn't look risen enough, it probably isn't going to be ready on time. That's probably when you will to bring it up to a warmer temp - maybe even 75-77F. It would be better to error on the side of too much rise.

Think of the first dozen or so times you do this as learning what to look for and how to correct when things are not progressing as you expect. Don't beat yourself up if it doesn't come out perfect initially. SD has a learning curve.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #167 on: November 20, 2013, 04:51:49 PM »
If all your fermentation is at 65F. It's not necessary to being it to 70F (or higher) unless you need to do so to speed thing up some. I'd suggest watching the last 12 hours. It will take a few times to learn what to look for in terms of the dough progressing as you would like. With 8 hours to go, if it doesn't look risen enough, it probably isn't going to be ready on time. That's probably when you will to bring it up to a warmer temp - maybe even 75-77F. It would be better to error on the side of too much rise.

Think of the first dozen or so times you do this as learning what to look for and how to correct when things are not progressing as you expect. Don't beat yourself up if it doesn't come out perfect initially. SD has a learning curve.

It's also possible that the dough will progress faster than you want, and you may need to stick it in the fridge for an hour or so. I wouldn't do this with less than two hours left, however.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #168 on: November 20, 2013, 05:40:49 PM »
It would be better to error on the side of too much rise.

If I'm going to be off in my predictions, I tend to prefer a dough that's not fermenting quickly enough that needs warmer temps towards the end of the process rather than a dough that's moving too quickly and has to be cooled down.  If, at the end of the process, you've missed your mark and the dough is underproofed, you can always give it a bit more time, but if it's overproofed, there's not much you can do.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #169 on: November 20, 2013, 06:37:40 PM »
If I'm going to be off in my predictions, I tend to prefer a dough that's not fermenting quickly enough that needs warmer temps towards the end of the process rather than a dough that's moving too quickly and has to be cooled down.  If, at the end of the process, you've missed your mark and the dough is underproofed, you can always give it a bit more time, but if it's overproofed, there's not much you can do.

That is the case with this dough. It progresses very slowly, even at the end. It has a very long window of usability even in hot Houston summer temps. At the TPS2, they saw it perform over an 8 hour window on a 106F day. I don't know what the temp in the coolers with the dough was, but I'd bet it was 80ish.

What I was trying to say is that if it is not progressing fast enough, you have to bring up the temp about 8 hours before you need it, or it will never catch up. When I suggested erring on the side of too much rise, I was suggesting that if 8 hours out, you are not sure, go ahead and warm it some.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline mbrulato

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #170 on: November 20, 2013, 06:54:44 PM »
So, I should use the dough pictures in this post as a guide to what my bubbles should look like about 8 hours before I open?

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,20477.msg202047.html#msg202047
Mary Ann

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #171 on: November 20, 2013, 07:17:06 PM »
That first ball in the tub is about what I want to see two hours before baking.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, commercial yeast when we must, but always great pizza."
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

Offline mbrulato

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #172 on: November 22, 2013, 03:12:47 PM »
Ok, here it goes.  Ischia is fully active, finished using the dough calculator and I'm ready to make NP dough for the first time.  Wish me luck.
Mary Ann

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #173 on: November 29, 2013, 06:34:49 PM »
Ok, here it goes.  Ischia is fully active, finished using the dough calculator and I'm ready to make NP dough for the first time.  Wish me luck.
Good luck Miss Mary Ann..... >:D
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Offline mbrulato

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Re: The Entire Pizza Making Process I use at the Garage
« Reply #174 on: November 29, 2013, 11:55:41 PM »
Good luck Miss Mary Ann..... >:D

Thanks, Bob. ;)
Mary Ann


 

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