Author Topic: Question re: Storage of flour  (Read 5482 times)

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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Question re: Storage of flour
« Reply #20 on: April 26, 2011, 05:54:59 PM »
Jon,

You're a good man. I suspected that Tom Lehmann misspelled the name of the unit, especially when I came up empty after searching for the machine using several different spellings. How did you find the darn thing?

Thanks also for the milling diagram.

Peter


Offline PapaJon

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Re: Question re: Storage of flour
« Reply #21 on: April 26, 2011, 06:06:48 PM »
Jon,

You're a good man. I suspected that Tom Lehmann misspelled the name of the unit, especially when I came up empty after searching for the machine using several different spellings. How did you find the darn thing?

Thanks also for the milling diagram.

Peter
I got the same blank response when looking for Tom's spelling and after peaking through a few search pages I decided to look for a process diagram for milling instead.  After looking at the diagram the miss spelled word was easy enough to spot.  I wonder if "unsound wheat" is industry speak for eggs.
Jon

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Question re: Storage of flour
« Reply #22 on: July 01, 2011, 09:06:24 AM »
We occasionally need to store flour for extended periods when conducting experiments for customers. The best way we have found to store flour for extended periods of time is to freeze it for a MINIMUM of 30-days, and then hold it under refrigeration for the remainder of the storage time. To prevent drying of the flour, be sure to plastic bag it. If you won't be using the entire contents of the 50# bag all at one time, we suggest breaking the bag down into smaller bag quantities appropriate for your use needs. Lastly, pull the flour from the fridge and allow it to warm back to room temperature before opening the bag. This will prevent any condensation from forming on the flour while you're in the process of using the contents of the bag, which might be several days. Whole -wheat flour is a totally DIFFERENT story.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline communist

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Re: Question re: Storage of flour
« Reply #23 on: July 01, 2011, 09:50:58 AM »
Thanks for the advice Tom.  Unfortunately, most home bakers do not have dedicated freezer space for a 50 pound bag of flour, nor much refrigerator space for more than one or two 5 pound ziploc bags.  I got rid of my home freezer 6 months ago.  Shucks.  I have 50 pounds of flour in a white plastic garbage bag inside a sturdy 20 gallon plastic garbarge can with clamping lid in my basement.  I use a 50 pound bag in about 5 months, but that is cooking pizza weekly for a family of six - about 4 pounds of finished dough per week, or just over 2 pounds of flour per week.  So far, no problems or bugs.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Question re: Storage of flour
« Reply #24 on: July 05, 2011, 10:41:35 AM »
Most of the time the insect problem comes from within the flour itself, rather than from the outside. It can be a roll of the dice if you will have buggy/wormy flour after much more than a month of storage. The key is to keep the flour as cool as possible. I've got a small chest freezer in my garage that I use for storing things that I inherit, such as extra flour, fish from a neighbor's successful fishing trip, surplus garden vegetables, you name it. It pays for itself in savings, and when I'm not using it, I just unplug it.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline scott r

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Re: Question re: Storage of flour
« Reply #25 on: July 05, 2011, 01:58:12 PM »
tom, other than getting bugs, is there anything else that can happen to stored flour that might make it bake up a sub par pizza?   My flour collection is way out of hand (three different italian flours and four domestic right now, all at one time purchased in 50lb sacks).   I could be crazy, but one of the flours, still totally free of bugs, is pretty old now.    I noticed the other day the the pizza I made with it was way crispier on the bottom than other similar flours, and I don't remember it behaving like this when it was young.   I thought I messed something up with the proofing or mix, and made another batch with the same exact outcome.   Its WAY crispy on the bottom.   This particular flour was stored in a more humid environment than the other flours I have stored which are all still baking up as usual.  It doesn't seem like it has gone rancid, it just ends up being super crispy????
« Last Edit: July 05, 2011, 11:19:52 PM by scott r »

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Question re: Storage of flour
« Reply #26 on: July 20, 2011, 10:16:28 AM »
Scott;
Even when stored in the freezer, flour will gradually change with storage time. The most significant change will be in oxidation of the flour. This has a significant strengthening effect upon the flour as far as dough performance is concerned. If the flour was "natural" or not fully matured when originally tested, and then put into the freezer for an extended period of time, and retested, say, a year later, it would perform differently, probably exhibiting more oven spring and a higher raised edge than the first test.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor