Author Topic: Charring and the Marketplace  (Read 3449 times)

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Offline Pizza De Puta

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Re: Charring and the Marketplace
« Reply #20 on: August 23, 2012, 12:37:03 PM »
. . . We developed Adam's pizza to be extraordinarily crispy . . .
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Now that IS interesting.  What steps would you suggest to go further in the crispy direction, Tom?

Thanks
RE


Online scott123

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Re: Charring and the Marketplace
« Reply #21 on: August 23, 2012, 04:19:02 PM »
Now that IS interesting.  What steps would you suggest to go further in the crispy direction, Tom?

2 finger eat-ability, crunch and crispiness are all a factor of bake time. Drop the temp, extend the clock and you've got crunch. At the same time, you lose oven spring and end up with something more chain-like than NY.

Offline Essen1

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Re: Charring and the Marketplace
« Reply #22 on: August 23, 2012, 06:07:53 PM »
I wonder if this is too much char on the bottom for a NY-style pizza...

Pie's from yesterday
Mike

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Online TXCraig1

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Re: Charring and the Marketplace
« Reply #23 on: August 23, 2012, 06:12:05 PM »
I wonder if this is too much char on the bottom for a NY-style pizza...

Pie's from yesterday

It looks pretty freggin perfect to me.
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline Essen1

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Re: Charring and the Marketplace
« Reply #24 on: August 23, 2012, 06:14:48 PM »
It looks pretty freggin perfect to me.

Thanks, Craig. That was the first pizza I made for myself in about 9 months.

I couldn't resist the cravings any longer.  ;D
Mike

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Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: Charring and the Marketplace
« Reply #25 on: August 23, 2012, 07:48:11 PM »
It looks pretty freggin perfect to me.

Yup.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Charring and the Marketplace
« Reply #26 on: August 23, 2012, 08:43:40 PM »
I would hit that in a New York minute.... :chef:
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Online scott123

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Re: Charring and the Marketplace
« Reply #27 on: August 23, 2012, 08:45:17 PM »
I wonder if this is too much char on the bottom for a NY-style pizza...

Are you really curious, Mike, or are you just showing off?  ;D

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Charring and the Marketplace
« Reply #28 on: August 23, 2012, 08:57:19 PM »
Are you really curious, Mike, or are you just showing off?  ;D
Ooooch!.....Scott no likey when crust have clacks...... :)
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Offline Essen1

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Re: Charring and the Marketplace
« Reply #29 on: August 23, 2012, 10:31:01 PM »
Are you really curious, Mike, or are you just showing off?  ;D

Not really, bro.  :P

But I have seen NY-style slices where the charring is all over the board, some minimal, some with medium and some with heavy char on the bottom. I guess mine falls into the medium category.

The first pic was the pie right out of the oven, the second was a re-heated slice a la Avellino. Used the Power flour for this one but it was a bit too chewy so I "diluted" it for my next pie with AP flour at a 70/30 ratio.

Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/


Offline Essen1

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Re: Charring and the Marketplace
« Reply #30 on: August 23, 2012, 10:31:19 PM »
Ooooch!.....Scott no likey when crust have clacks...... :)

Lol.  ;D
Mike

"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."  - Albert Einstein

http://thehobbycook.blogspot.com/

Online scott123

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Re: Charring and the Marketplace
« Reply #31 on: August 23, 2012, 10:45:59 PM »
Not really, bro.  :P

I figured as much  ;D Hey, if you got it, flaunt it.

Offline JConk007

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Re: Charring and the Marketplace
« Reply #32 on: August 23, 2012, 10:53:51 PM »
Bob yes I like a pick up the hole pie char crust on my NY this was AT
fun to go back in the archives 2010 ?
« Last Edit: August 23, 2012, 11:03:10 PM by JConk007 »
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Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Charring and the Marketplace
« Reply #33 on: August 23, 2012, 11:23:01 PM »
Bob yes I like a pick up the hole pie char crust on my NY this was AT
fun to go back in the archives 2010 ?
Nooiiice!!   ;D
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Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Charring and the Marketplace
« Reply #34 on: August 24, 2012, 08:37:35 AM »
PDP;
I was AJ's last night and picked up a pizza to take home for dinner (I live about 12-miles from the store), when I got home withthe pizza we dived right into it. It is interesting to note that even after all that time in the box you could still eat the pizza with one hand, N.Y. style by slightly folding the crust (and I do mean only slightly). You have to keep in mind that this pizza is made using a very different process from what everyone thinks of when baking pizzas. To begin, we make a par-baked crust (hand tossed) with only a portion of the sauce on it. These are inventoried until needed. To make a slice, the crust is divided into equal size slices using an Equalizer from Lloyd pans, and a slice is removed, then dressed to the customer's order (this includes more sauce, any toppings desired, and cheese), the cheese is put on last to hold the slice together, this is baked on a non-stick Hex Disk (Lloyd Pans), but this is where it gets interesting, the pizza is now baked from the top down using a special top and bottom bake profile in an air impingement oven. This gives us a total bake time of just over 3-minutes for either a slice or whole pizza. I developed this procedure for them in response to the soft, soggy pizza slices that I was getting in New York a few years ago. It has everything everyone here in Manhattan wants, a New York presentation, and a crispy crust.
You can read more about AJ's at <www.ajsnypizza.com>. That's the good news, the bad news is that we haven't yet been able to replicate this type of pizza using anything but a commercial air impingement oven. For a super crispy crust characteristic you might experiment using a par baked crust.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline weemis

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Re: Charring and the Marketplace
« Reply #35 on: August 24, 2012, 09:58:12 AM »
Hey, if you got it, flaunt it.

this from the least flaunty member of the forum   :-D
Nick Gore - just a dough eyed wanderer

Offline pizzaneer

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Re: Charring and the Marketplace
« Reply #36 on: August 24, 2012, 10:11:28 AM »
Make what you like, but also make what the average customer wants.  Your average customer may not be Papa John's average customer.

A good NY base (floppy) is hard to beat in terms of raking in the business.  Adding a higher-temp char at a later date when you have another oven is feasible, but will appeal mostly to the die-hard pizza fans.

I'm basing this on my experience.  I can't even get my wife to pick up a slice if there is any visible char.  But then, her idea of a tasty meal is Velveeta Shells & Cheese. I despair of her ever growing a taste bud. I think they fell off in childhood.
I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.

Offline Giggliato

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Re: Charring and the Marketplace
« Reply #37 on: September 08, 2012, 10:30:21 AM »
Some people like char and some people don't.

I'm pretty sure there is an extremely large market for well done pizzas, but if you are trying to serve these well done pizzas to a clientele that is used to little Caesars and papa john's you may run into issues as you mention. I would suggest a free sampling grand opening party...

By the way, I think large rim blisters are due to fermentation issues.


 

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