Author Topic: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn  (Read 11634 times)

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Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #20 on: October 26, 2012, 06:06:41 PM »
I decided to try 3 of the recipes in the book this weekend:

Lardo Typico
Pancetta Tesa
Simple Salami

Today, I prepared the lardo - salting away for 6 months. Calendar marked for April 26. The smell of the cure was so intoxicating, I'm not sure I can wait that long. 


Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #21 on: October 27, 2012, 06:00:14 PM »
Day 2: Pancetta Tesa

Curing in the refrigerator for 5 days, then will hang to dry for a few weeks. I may lop a portion off before then for cold smoking in the pit - bacon.

Offline Jackitup

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #22 on: October 27, 2012, 06:07:19 PM »
Looking forward to the finished report!!!

jon
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Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #23 on: October 28, 2012, 10:36:23 PM »
The salame was clearly much more involved than the lardo and pancetta - chop, grind, mix in starter, and stuff into casings. The culture is getting back to life at 80F/80%RH till tomorrow morning. Then they cure at 60F/60% RH, misted with a mold culture, until they've lost 30% weight. If I make this again, I'll do half a batch. Rather than 2x18" pieces, I'd would be easier with 2x9" pieces and more than enough for us. Hard to tell from the photos, but the diameter is about 2.5".

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #24 on: November 01, 2012, 04:57:07 PM »
Pancetta tesa is done curing and now in with the salame to dry for a few weeks.

Offline Jackitup

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #25 on: November 01, 2012, 05:58:13 PM »
Yeah....now the HARD part......THE WAITING!!!

jon
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Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #26 on: November 01, 2012, 07:52:21 PM »
Bill - Do they give more instruction on building the curing chamber in the second book? Is that one you are using your own design? Looks fantastic. I tried the guanciale from the first book and it was a disaster (I think it was from the first book?).

John

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #27 on: November 01, 2012, 09:06:10 PM »
Bill - Do they give more instruction on building the curing chamber in the second book? Is that one you are using your own design? Looks fantastic. I tried the guanciale from the first book and it was a disaster (I think it was from the first book?).

John

John,

No building instructions in the book. I'm using an old, tall wine fridge set to the desired temp. Unlike the smaller wine cooler I converted for fermenting and proofing bread, this one has no need for a heat source since the ambient temp in the garage is higher than the target temp. A little humidifier attached to a humidity control is the main addition. There is very small fan inside to circulate the air. There is no need for any form of dehumidification since the climate here is very dry. I leave the door about 1/8" open to keep the air fresh. The problem is that the garage now smells like a delicatessen, which is driving the dogs crazy.

Offline Jackitup

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #28 on: November 01, 2012, 09:19:42 PM »
John,

No building instructions in the book. I'm using an old, tall wine fridge set to the desired temp. Unlike the smaller wine cooler I converted for fermenting and proofing bread, this one has no need for a heat source since the ambient temp in the garage is higher than the target temp. A little humidifier attached to a humidity control is the main addition. There is very small fan inside to circulate the air. There is no need for any form of dehumidification since the climate here is very dry. I leave the door about 1/8" open to keep the air fresh. The problem is that the garage now smells like a delicatessen, which is driving the dogs crazy.

Hell with the dogs, it must drive YOU crazy too!!! :-D
Save A Cow, Eat A Vegan....Totally Organic And Hormone Free!!

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #29 on: November 26, 2012, 04:07:04 PM »
Pancetta tesa is done! Made bucatini all'amatriciana today. Different recipes using the pancetta on the menu the rest of the week.





Offline Jackitup

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #30 on: November 29, 2012, 10:45:18 PM »
Been meaning to respond to your post Bill....FREAKING AWESOME!!!!! I think we should have a separate "charcuterie" thread. I have 25 pounds of capicola seasoned pork shoulder rolling in the vacuum tumbler right now along with about 8 pounds of eye of round too. Will be hitting the smoker for a long, light smoke in the next day or 2. Looking forward to how the beef tastes seasoned that way. Also thinking of getting a small fridge with humidity control to do the long haul, dry aged stuff. Any suggestions on that throw them my way. Great job their brother!!!

jon
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Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #31 on: November 30, 2012, 08:29:40 AM »
Thanks, jon. Not sure about a separate thread. In one way it is an off-topic food, but in another important way for me, it is an important ingredient in my pizzas. Below are some quick shots of yesterday's bake using the pancetta. I made a "butter" by whipping together some of the pancetta and some ricotta cheese. Made a great stuffing for calzones and for a riff on focaccia di Recco - with tiny chewy bits of pork and partially rendered fat and gooey cheese and also some garlicky mushrooms. Tomorrow I'm planning on stuffing some of the pancetta/ricotta "butter" into some raviolis.

Regarding the curing chamber: temperature control should be the easy part (I aim for ~60F). Humidity control is going to have a lot to do with your ambient relative humidity. You may need a dehumidifier - I don't since it is so dry here.

Update on the salami: I've been tasting small pieces each week. It is almost done drying, but I am not impressed with the flavor yet. Good mold is starting cover the casing. This may take a few months.   

Online norma427

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #32 on: November 30, 2012, 09:03:58 AM »
Bill,

I am always amazed at what lengths you go to when making your pizzas or toppings for your pizzas.   :chef:

Your pancetta looks mouth-watering delicious!  I wish there were a drool button for many things that you make.   :P

You sure are patient and willing to make the best pizzas and toppings.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #33 on: November 30, 2012, 01:06:07 PM »
Latest installment in meals this week that use the pancetta: Pastiera Rustica di Tagliolini, a rich pasta casserole loaded with cheese, butter, milk, and dry-cured pork. I added some of the mushrooms left over from yesterday's pizzas.


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #34 on: November 30, 2012, 03:42:24 PM »
Bill,

Your Pastiera Rustica di Tagliolini is a thing of beauty. Is that angel hair pasta and, if so, did you make it yourself?

Peter

Offline Jackitup

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #35 on: November 30, 2012, 04:16:26 PM »
Looks great, almost like a Carbonara pasta, which I love!! I'll be making some pasta with this new batch of Capicola for sure. Do you have a recipe you would share with what you have there??

jon
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Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #36 on: November 30, 2012, 05:32:24 PM »
Is that angel hair pasta and, if so, did you make it yourself?
Thank you, Peter. This is what I used:

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #37 on: November 30, 2012, 05:44:07 PM »
Looks great, almost like a Carbonara pasta, which I love!! I'll be making some pasta with this new batch of Capicola for sure. Do you have a recipe you would share with what you have there??

This recipe has quite a lot of milk in it, something a carbonara purist would find objectionable (the orthodox view is that cream is a crutch. I violate a few other carbonara prime directives in this dish). This is a baked dish based on a recipe in the book, Naples at Table, Cooking in Campania by Arthur Schwartz. I only referred to the recipe in the book to make sure I got the spelling right in the above post. Otherwise, I winged it today along these lines, measuring nothing:

1. Boil pasta just short of being done.
2. Drain pasta and toss in lots of butter.
3. Dump in some milk and mix frequently until most of the milk is absorbed by the pasta
4. Beat some eggs.
5. Grate lots of parm and pecorino into the eggs.
6. Grind lots of pepper into the eggs
7. Mix the egg/cheese mixture into the pasta.
8. Mix some diced provolone into the pasta.
9. Mix diced pancetta into the pasta.
10. Grease a large casserole dish with butter or lard
11. Bake until top is lightly browned.
12. Rest for a while.

Very easy. Profoundly satisfying.

Offline Jackitup

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #38 on: November 30, 2012, 06:02:31 PM »
Thank you sir. Kind of like a baked Carbonara, sounds great!

jon
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Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #39 on: November 30, 2012, 06:07:50 PM »
Thank you sir. Kind of like a baked Carbonara, sounds great!

jon

BTW, the recipe in the book calls for half pancetta and half sopressata. I used all pancetta for obvious reasons.


 

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