Author Topic: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn  (Read 14524 times)

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Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #40 on: December 02, 2012, 01:46:14 PM »
This is probably the last pancetta post for a while. Sliced some up, fried it like bacon, and used it on some burgers with Tartinish buns. Also sauteed mushroom and green chile.


Offline jeff v

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #41 on: December 02, 2012, 01:52:29 PM »
Looks really good Bill. I wonder if you would post any info abt the workflow and bake of the buns. I believe I've seen you mention Tartine crusty rolls/buns before but couldn't find it.
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Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #42 on: December 02, 2012, 07:11:29 PM »
Thanks, Jeff. It's just my standard Tartine dough, formed into 130g buns for proofing. Brushed with butter before going in the oven (450F convection) and again after coming out. I use this size bun for 6 oz. patties. I proof 6 buns on a 1/4 size jelly roll pan. They come out squarish, so I form the patties into a similar size and shape.

Absolutely no question that the buns are the star of this dish. Also great for other kinds of sandwiches where you want a sturdy bun.


Offline jeff v

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #43 on: December 02, 2012, 09:33:38 PM »
Thanks Bill.

I'm looking forward to following this thread, so please don't forget us! I can also recommend this recipe for whipped lardo when yours is done in April. You would start at step 4.

http://issuu.com/spensermagazine/docs/spenser_magazine-issue_one/40?mode=mobile
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Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #44 on: December 12, 2012, 02:32:06 PM »
Still working on the pancetta. Made the best ravioli I have ever eaten today with whipped pancetta/ricotta filling enriched with some beaten egg. The first batch with a marinara sauce (photo below) was definitely overcooked - the filling got a little soggy. The sauce overpowered the delicate flavors of the filling. The second batch was cooked just right with a fluffy filling. Instead of the marinara, I just drizzled some olive oil/garlic over the ravioli and grated some pecorino. Yolk-rich pasta sheets from a French Laundry recipe.



Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #45 on: December 15, 2012, 04:17:16 PM »
Yolk-rich pasta sheets from a French Laundry recipe.

Is that the Agnolotti recipe from French Laundry? I love that one. We make ravioli quite often, and when I have fresh eggs I always use a rediculous amount of yolks.

Really beautiful pancetta. If I had not failed miserably at my last guanciale attempt I would pick up this book. Can't wait to see the Lardo.

John
« Last Edit: December 15, 2012, 05:32:27 PM by dellavecchia »

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #46 on: December 15, 2012, 05:31:24 PM »
Is that the Angnolotti recipe from French Laundry? I love that one.

Yes, John. It is this recipe:

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Pasta-Dough-for-Agnolotti-105858

Lardo still has about 4 months to go. I see it every time I open up the refrigerator and wonder whether, inside the black wrapping, the fat is developing into something amazing or whether it has been slowly putrefying.


Offline jeff v

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #47 on: December 15, 2012, 05:56:19 PM »

Lardo still has about 4 months to go. I see it every time I open up the refrigerator and wonder whether, inside the black wrapping, the fat is developing into something amazing or whether it has been slowly putrefying.

 :-D

I feel your pain, and share the anticipation!
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Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #48 on: December 17, 2012, 12:36:28 PM »
I wasn't going to post any more about the pancetta, but the bread I just made with it was too good not to share. Once again, I called on the pancetta whipped with ricotta cheese. After fermenting some Tartine dough, I studded a dough with many morsels of the whipped pancetta, formed into a baguette, proofed and baked. The entire loaf was redolent with the aroma of the pancetta spices. The little cheesy, chewy pork morsels were icing on the cake. Must be eaten warm since the cooled cheese was little rubbery.

 

Offline Jackitup

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #49 on: December 17, 2012, 01:24:19 PM »
BEAUTIFUL.....I can imagine that cut into little crostini rounds and topped with all kinds of rich goodies!!!

jon
Save A Cow, Eat A Vegan....Totally Organic And Hormone Free!!


Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #50 on: December 24, 2012, 02:39:51 PM »
So much for no more pancetta posts. This pancetta recipe is worth the price of admission for the Salumi book. I tried to get the best, freshest pork belly I could - in this case from a Red Wattle pig. The pancetta is so intensely porky and the fat so unctuous. There is nothing about the flavor that would prevent it from being used in this ramen dish I made that calls for braised pork belly. Just before serving, I places slices of pancetta in the shoyu-based broth to heat it through. This is one of the best dishes I have served all year.

 

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #51 on: January 17, 2013, 06:38:47 PM »
Status update:

Pancetta Tessa: Incredibly delicious and easy. I must have used this in a few dozen recipes. All gone. I never did get around to cold smoking a piece after dry curing for bacon. I've got another beautiful belly in the freezer that will be cured soon.

Lardo Typico: Still curing. Supposed to be ready in 3 more months

Simple Salame: Done curing. We've eaten half of it. Very good, but for all the effort I expected it would be much better. Will not repeat.

Guanciale with Black Pepper: A few days ago I covered a beautiful piece of pork jowl with salt and pepper. Cured in refrigerator for 4 days. Rinsed, washed with white whine, applied some more pepper, and it is now dry curing for 3-5 weeks. Photo below.

Offline deb415611

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #52 on: January 17, 2013, 07:22:45 PM »
great posts Bill.  I bought this book and have only looked through it quickly.  I have a nice belly in the freezer that is destined for pancetta tessa. 

Offline jak123

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #53 on: January 17, 2013, 08:58:01 PM »
received a giant box of samples from creminelli today....excited to delve into everything...vert artistic folks

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #54 on: January 19, 2013, 12:35:36 PM »
Bill - Did you stick to the recipes as printed, using the 3% salt ratio, and was the final product a good salt level for you?

John

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #55 on: January 19, 2013, 12:37:27 PM »
Bill - Did you stick to the recipes as printed, using the 3% salt ratio, and was the final product a good salt level for you?

John

Yes and yes.

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #56 on: January 19, 2013, 12:41:41 PM »
Yes and yes.

Excellent. Off to the store to order some heritage pork belly, jowls, and back fat.

John

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #57 on: January 19, 2013, 12:53:34 PM »
Excellent. Off to the store to order some heritage pork belly, jowls, and back fat.

John

Pancetta, guanciale, lardo?

Photos, please!

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #58 on: January 21, 2013, 12:51:14 PM »
Local pork belly is in the fridge for it's cure. I cut it in half for easier handling. I have visions of all the pizza and pasta I am going to enhance with this pancetta - fingers crossed it works! The salt level seemed low per the book recipe, but I am sticking to it since Bill had such a good end product. I used coarse Maine sea salt.

John

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #59 on: January 21, 2013, 01:26:20 PM »
Local pork belly is in the fridge for it's cure. I cut it in half for easier handling. I have visions of all the pizza and pasta I am going to enhance with this pancetta - fingers crossed it works! The salt level seemed low per the book recipe, but I am sticking to it since Bill had such a good end product. I used coarse Maine sea salt.

John

Looks good, John. Where are you going to dry cure it after it comes out of the refrigerator?


 

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