Author Topic: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn  (Read 18794 times)

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Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #75 on: February 09, 2013, 12:48:24 PM »
Thank you Deb and Bill.

I have not tried a raw slice - I am little concerned about that. I think after I get the cure perfect for the full duration I will be ready try some crudo.

I left the skin on and it is hard as a rock. The book urges you to do so, but I am thinking next time I won't.

John


Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #76 on: February 09, 2013, 05:42:12 PM »
I made a quick dough so I could top it with pork belly. The porky flavor and subtle herb note is ridiculously addicting. I will probably have it with pasta tomorrow night.

John

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #77 on: February 09, 2013, 05:52:48 PM »
I wish I could think of words that would adequately describe how good that looks.
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Offline Qarl

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #78 on: February 09, 2013, 06:00:08 PM »
So my 14 cubic foot upright freezer is working and humidifying... now to make the fermentation chamber to get warm temps and high humidity for fermented sausages...

I have everything else... :)


Offline trosenberg

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #79 on: February 10, 2013, 06:39:06 PM »
That is some seriously good looking meat.  You are inspiring me to pursue another hobby. Making pizza, curing meat, sous vide, drinking wine, growing vegetables... How the hell am I supposed to find time for work ?
Trosenberg

Offline Qarl

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #80 on: March 01, 2013, 05:48:45 PM »
I picked myself up a Berkshire jowl today to make guanciale!

And a small piece of belly (about 3 pounds)... I guess I'll make some pancetta with that!

These will be my first two pieces of cured meats!

 :chef:

Offline Qarl

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #81 on: March 09, 2013, 11:46:54 PM »
Well, the jowl I purchased was actually cut in half.  Didn't notice since it was vacuum sealed when I picked it up... so I have two smaller jowls.

They finished the cure in the fridge (bay leave, rosemary, black pepper, white pepper, salt).. and were rinsed in wine.  Now they have a fresh coat of peppper and are hanging to dry in the salumi curing chamber (i.e., converted upright freezer)


Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #82 on: March 27, 2013, 06:15:06 PM »
I left the skin on and baked thin slices of the pancetta in the oven. The skin became puffed and crunchy, just like pork rinds. They were supposed to go on burgers but my kids and I ate them as-is before they made it to the table.

I have three jowls ready to go into the curing chamber this weekend.

John

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #83 on: April 09, 2013, 01:51:58 PM »
The guanciale was ready to try. I diced some up for a light tomato sauce for Bucatini all'Amatriciana with Setaro pasta. Best guanciale I have ever made or tasted. Score: 2 wins (pancetta, guanciale), 1 loser (salame), and 1 still in progress (lardo - ready in a few weeks!)



Watch at 1080p if you can.

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Offline Serpentelli

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #84 on: April 09, 2013, 02:17:06 PM »
The guanciale was ready to try. I diced some up for a light tomato sauce for Bucatini all'Amatriciana with Setaro pasta. Best guanciale I have ever made or tasted. Score: 2 wins (pancetta, guanciale), 1 loser (salame), and 1 still in progress (lardo - ready in a few weeks!)



Watch at 1080p if you can.

Bill,

That is unbelievably great looking. And I am blown away by your video production values. I am kind of expecting IMAX the next time around. Perhaps we can see the lardo debuted in 3D IMAX?

Love and know the all'Amatriciana sauce well. Its my favorite. Please post pics/video for my/our benefit if you can!

John K

PS I don't see a webpage or blog address for your videos. Do you keep those in one location on YouTube?
« Last Edit: April 09, 2013, 02:19:40 PM by Serpentelli »
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Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #85 on: April 09, 2013, 02:37:25 PM »
[size=78%]PS I don't see a webpage or blog address for your videos. Do you keep those in one location on YouTube?[/size]


Thanks, John. I discontinued my blog last year. Most of my YouTube videos are here:


http://www.youtube.com/user/ExtremeCooking?feature=watch



Sometimes I use big words that I donít fully understand in an effort to make myself sound more photosynthesis. - @itjenlawrence

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #86 on: April 16, 2013, 11:57:30 AM »
Looks great Bill. Beautiful fat. One of the three guanciale I had hanging was small, and it lost 40% of it's weight in just under three weeks. The other two are still cooking. Here is the small one and some carbonara I made.

Blog post with link to recipe (which is not a standard carbonara) can be found here:

http://www.johndellavecchia.com/2013/04/16/spaghetti-all-carbonara/

John

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #87 on: April 16, 2013, 12:07:20 PM »
Looks great Bill. Beautiful fat. One of the three guanciale I had hanging was small, and it lost 40% of it's weight in just under three weeks. The other two are still cooking. Here is the small one and some carbonara I made.

Blog post with link to recipe (which is not a standard carbonara) can be found here:

http://www.johndellavecchia.com/2013/04/16/spaghetti-all-carbonara/

John

Really nice looking blog John. The photography is great.
Back to being a civilian pizza maker only.

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #88 on: April 16, 2013, 12:47:24 PM »
Really nice looking blog John. The photography is great.

Thanks Jeff.

John

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #89 on: April 16, 2013, 01:24:25 PM »
John,


So here's what I'm thinking. Rather than duplicate your beautiful efforts, we divvy up the recipes and we send each other half of the results? I'll do lardo, you do pancetta... etc. Any else who wants in has to send us each a whole prosciutto to see if they are worthy.


Deal?  ;)


Bill/SFNM
Sometimes I use big words that I donít fully understand in an effort to make myself sound more photosynthesis. - @itjenlawrence

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #90 on: April 16, 2013, 03:05:05 PM »
Beautiful John. Where do you get eggs like that?
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Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #91 on: April 16, 2013, 04:09:53 PM »
Deal?  ;)

Deal! Although you need to be the one who takes on the prosciutto first.

I am hoping that next February I will be able to set up a stainless steel table in my backyard, have a freshly slaughtered Mangalitsa pig set down on it, and I carve it up into the "big eight". All pieces go directly into various salt mixtures. Plus the rest to cook outright over coals that day.

John


Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #92 on: April 16, 2013, 04:13:58 PM »
Beautiful John. Where do you get eggs like that?

Thank you Craig - There are alot of local farms in and around Boston, especially in Metrowest where I live. We can get very fresh eggs here that are organic and cage-free. The eggs have brown shells and come from Rhode Island Reds, the oldest breed in New England.

John

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #93 on: April 16, 2013, 04:59:38 PM »
Deal! Although you need to be the one who takes on the prosciutto first.

I am hoping that next February I will be able to set up a stainless steel table in my backyard, have a freshly slaughtered Mangalitsa pig set down on it, and I carve it up into the "big eight". All pieces go directly into various salt mixtures. Plus the rest to cook outright over coals that day.

John


I'll be happy to buy a share of that pig!!! Seriously.
Sometimes I use big words that I donít fully understand in an effort to make myself sound more photosynthesis. - @itjenlawrence

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #95 on: April 28, 2013, 03:16:47 PM »
Spuma di Lardo - ground and whipped:


Spread on some warm Tartine bread it was awesome. Even better, though no surprise, was slathered on some super sweet grilled corn.



Sometimes I use big words that I donít fully understand in an effort to make myself sound more photosynthesis. - @itjenlawrence

Offline shuboyje

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #96 on: May 07, 2013, 06:02:58 PM »
So far it seems like you guys would give this book a good review overall?  I've got half of a home raised Red Wattle coming in the near future and am looking for a nice guide to yield an abundance of meat candy.
-Jeff

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #97 on: May 07, 2013, 06:16:33 PM »
So far it seems like you guys would give this book a good review overall?  I've got half of a home raised Red Wattle coming in the near future and am looking for a nice guide to yield an abundance of meat candy.


Yes, I would say it is an excellent book to help you break down your pig and turn some of the special parts into special meals. As you can see from my posts in this thread, I wasn't impressed with the salame, but the pancetta, guanciale, and lardo where all outstanding.


 
Sometimes I use big words that I donít fully understand in an effort to make myself sound more photosynthesis. - @itjenlawrence

Offline deb415611

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #98 on: October 09, 2014, 08:51:36 AM »
Latest installment in meals this week that use the pancetta: Pastiera Rustica di Tagliolini, a rich pasta casserole loaded with cheese, butter, milk, and dry-cured pork. I added some of the mushrooms left over from yesterday's pizzas.

wow, just put this together to bake later today, pretty awesome tasting unbaked
Deb

Offline Matthew

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Re: Salumi: The Craft of Italian Dry Curing, by Ruhlman and Polcyn
« Reply #99 on: May 02, 2015, 06:17:03 AM »
Here's a guanciale that I started at the end of March. 


M


 

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