Author Topic: "San Francisco" sourdough vs Ischia  (Read 181 times)

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Offline Chaze215

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"San Francisco" sourdough vs Ischia
« on: September 12, 2014, 11:17:58 AM »
Is there a difference in flavor between the 2? I'm assuming that most starters have distinct flavor differences....or don't they? I'm thinking more along the the lines of it being used in breads as opposed to used in pizza.
« Last Edit: September 12, 2014, 11:19:39 AM by Chaze215 »
Chaz


Offline Donjo911

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Re: "San Francisco" sourdough vs Ischia
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2014, 11:29:58 AM »
My experience has been that the SF has a more sour taste than Ischia but it is not a significantly sour taste when used in small percentages in dough. It also, at least withy he one I have revitalized from sourdough.com, has significantly more lifting power and seems to provide a more creamy quality to the crust than Ischia. I stopped using Ischia as my primary largely because it's more predictable than my other three starters.  I tried a home grown starter, Camaldoli, Ischia, and SF in that order, and FWIW, would rank them in reverse of that order in preference.  One thing that I noticed, which other members have frequently remarked, the Ischia starter gets a very strong cheese (or vomit) smell while activating, and when the feeding schedule is coming back up. Of all 4 starters, it's the only one that has this quality. It does go away once it's healthy and active. What are you looking to get from a starter? It will be interesting to hear what others report.
Cheers,
Don
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Offline corkd

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Re: "San Francisco" sourdough vs Ischia
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2014, 11:33:15 AM »
I have had both from sourdough.com and I found a tremendous difference between the two. The SF was too aggressive for me, even after washing it frequently. Way too sour for pizza, to my taste. I have been using the French starter for longest- although I have a suspicion that (some? All?) starters eventually morph into a local version if you keep them around long enough. At least, this is what has happened to my French starter.

Offline woodmakesitgood

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Re: "San Francisco" sourdough vs Ischia
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2014, 02:05:32 PM »
I have had both from sourdough.com and I found a tremendous difference between the two. The SF was too aggressive for me, even after washing it frequently. Way too sour for pizza, to my taste. I have been using the French starter for longest- although I have a suspicion that (some? All?) starters eventually morph into a local version if you keep them around long enough. At least, this is what has happened to my French starter.

Given that, how do the people who sell starters maintain their original strains?

Offline corkd

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Re: "San Francisco" sourdough vs Ischia
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2014, 03:33:11 PM »
Those come in a dried version. What I was referring to, is that with repeated feeding and use, I have experienced some of them change over time. There are others who maintain several, and report that they are distinctly different. After experimenting with this, I decided to stick with one.

Clay

Offline Chaze215

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Re: "San Francisco" sourdough vs Ischia
« Reply #5 on: September 13, 2014, 08:41:25 AM »
Thanks for the feedback guys. I've had a few people ask me if I can make sourdough bread "like San Francisco" sourdough. I've never had San Francisco sourdough so I dont know the difference /similarities between the 2. When I add more starter to a recipe to get a more sour flavor, it seems to come off as a wine or alcohol flavor to me.
Just out of curiosity, when do you use the starter in a recipe? After a feeding? Use the starter that you would discard prior to a feeding?
Chaz

Offline corkd

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Re: "San Francisco" sourdough vs Ischia
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2014, 09:53:59 PM »
I use the starter when it passes the "float test", just like tartine's method for levain. That works best for me.
The window for a refreshed starter is relatively short-- a few hours. I have experimented with using a quantity of active starter instead of tartine levain-- so, 200g of active starter instead of 100g flour + 100g water + 20g active starter left for 8-12 hrs to ferment. The 200g of active starter produces a much more sour dough.

Hope this helps.

Clay