Author Topic: cake yeast  (Read 1675 times)

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Offline jellybear

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cake yeast
« on: November 07, 2005, 04:23:17 PM »
What is your most preffered type of yeast?I am using a cake yeast now but I think I like the instant better.What is the measuring of yeast to flour?


Offline chiguy

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Re: cake yeast
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2005, 06:32:01 PM »
 Hi, Jellybear
 I am a fan of the Instant Dry Yeast especially if you are in the pizza business. It's cheap and you can use a fairly low amount in the dough 3/4% to weight of flour. The IDY has consistent activity which helps if you have to put a 16 year old in charge of making dough. It does not have to be rehydrated in the water and can be added to the dry ingrediants. I think it helps a great deal not having to activate yeast in warm water the temperatures are always inconsistent in my experience. When i use my IDY i use a Gallon of water left on the tile floor in the kitchen which keeps the water a bit under 70Degrees. The doughis mixed and comes off the hook at 80 Degrees almost every time. It then goes into the fridge for about 18 hours. I take the dough out 2 hours before it is baked, it needs time to relax and come back to room temp, it will be easier to work with.  I try to shoot for 78-82Degrees for retarded dough, over 84degrees can result in an over fermented dough. I am sure you are aware of some of  these procedures. I just wanted to list some of the pro's of IDY.          Chiguy 

Online Pete-zza

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Re: cake yeast
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2005, 06:50:07 PM »
I agree with what chiguy has said on this subject, however the amount of yeast to use will also depend on what kind of dough you are making, that is, whether it is a same-day (e.g., a few hours), room-temperature fermented dough or one that is subjected to a 1-3 day cold fermentation in your cooler. The former situation will usually call for more yeast than the latter.

Peter

Offline jellybear

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Re: cake yeast
« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2005, 07:45:13 PM »
Thanks for the replies,Why that long in the fridgeIs that for the dough to relax?

Online Pete-zza

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Re: cake yeast
« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2005, 09:13:43 PM »
The long time is mainly to develop more flavor in the crust due to increased flavor-enhancing byproducts of fermentation but it also gives the pizza operator greater flexibility over its inventory of dough balls by extending their useful life. The longer fermentation also allows the gluten to relax more (due in part to the protease enzymes attacking the gluten) and increase the extensibility of the dough but that is more or less incidental to the other factors. Today, pizza operators have dough conditioners like PZ-44 to deal with doughs that are too elastic, such as those made from high-gluten flours. They don't have to wait for time and enzymes and bacteria and all the other chemistry to do the job.

Peter
« Last Edit: November 08, 2005, 09:19:40 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline jellybear

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Re: cake yeast
« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2005, 11:06:18 AM »
Im sorry,but it is wet yeast that I am using,Is it all right to just add to the flour and then add the water?

Online Pete-zza

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Re: cake yeast
« Reply #6 on: November 09, 2005, 11:15:28 AM »
With wet yeast you can either proof it in warm water or just crumble it into the flour in your mixer.

Peter


 

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