Author Topic: Brush Oil on the Crust?  (Read 1377 times)

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Offline holdem

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Brush Oil on the Crust?
« on: September 17, 2012, 03:02:34 PM »
Has anyone ever brushed oil on the rolled out dough before putting on the sauce? I saw that tip somewhere. It was to prevent the sauce from making the crust soggy.


Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Brush Oil on the Crust?
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2012, 03:52:39 PM »
I tried that several times when I first started making pizza yrs ago.  It doesnt make much difference IMO.

Offline Meatballs

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Re: Brush Oil on the Crust?
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2012, 04:11:03 PM »
I will occassionally brush the crust with oil if I want more "fried" and crispy bones.  It does not hurt but makes a different product you may or may not like.

Ron

Offline La Sera

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Re: Brush Oil on the Crust?
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2012, 05:20:14 PM »
The oil can also reduce the cooking of the top of the dough, leaving a half-cooked layer just below the cheese layer. It also can inhibit browning of the outside crust.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Brush Oil on the Crust?
« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2012, 06:51:06 PM »
Has anyone ever brushed oil on the rolled out dough before putting on the sauce? I saw that tip somewhere. It was to prevent the sauce from making the crust soggy.


This is a method that Tom Lehmann frequently uses, as he notes in Reply 6 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,20035.msg203589/topicseen.html#msg203589. He also frequently suggests using fresh sliced tomatoes in lieu of the canned tomatoes.

Peter

Offline Giggliato

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Re: Brush Oil on the Crust?
« Reply #5 on: September 17, 2012, 07:32:01 PM »
Yes, olive oil and garlic is one of my favorite bases. No need for tomatoes.

Online norma427

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Re: Brush Oil on the Crust?
« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2012, 09:23:06 PM »
I always brush garlic herb infused oil on my skins for Greek style pizzas made in a steel pan.  I really donít do it to prevent the sauce from making the crust soggy, but do it to make the crust whole pizza taste a little better.  It also helps when proofing the skin, (in the steel pan) so it doesnít dry out.

Norma 
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Online Garvey

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Re: Brush Oil on the Crust?
« Reply #7 on: September 18, 2012, 10:37:52 AM »
When I am making the last pizza for the night, when everyone's full and most or all of it will wind up in the fridge, I will brush with oil to create a moisture barrier, to try to keep the sauce from soaking into the crust too much overnight.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Brush Oil on the Crust?
« Reply #8 on: September 18, 2012, 12:47:43 PM »
Garvey hit the nail on the head.
While many of us here, at this web site don't let the pizza skin set around for any length of time between dressing and baking, that isn't always the case in a commercial pizzeria establishment. In order to cope with getting "slammed" at say, 7:00 p.m. of Friday nights (for example) it is a common practice to pre-sauce the pizza skins and hold them in the cooler until needed. When they get slammed, all they need to do is to pull a pre-sauced skin and add the toppings. This helps to keep the delivery time between an order being place, and the pizza being delivered to the customer's table more reasonable. Oiling the pizza skin prior to sauce application helps by creating a moisture barrier, thus preventing/reducing moisture migration into the dough prior to baking. When using fresh tomato slices instead of a sauce, the oil application again reduces the moisture migration into the dough as the fresh tomato slices begin to release their moisture during the baking process. If blended with garlic or other herbs, it will also add another dimension of flavor to the finished pizza. Just don't get carried away with the oil, if you can see a reflection (shine) on the dough from the oil, you have added all that is necessary, if you add too much, you can create a situation where the toppings just slide off of the slice with the first bite. Take and bake pizzas also benefit from the oil addition too as it may be hours, or even days between dressing the pizza skin and baking it. If you want to see what we are working against here, just put a spoon full of your sauce on a china plate, and cover it to prevent evaporation, then come back to it in 30-minutes, or so and you will typically see a ring of water around the sauce, this is the water that can soak into the dough resulting is the dreaded gum line just beneath the sauce layer.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline vtn98

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Re: Brush Oil on the Crust?
« Reply #9 on: September 21, 2012, 01:57:32 PM »
I like to make a garlic infused olive oil that I brush on the edges before baking.  I'll even sprinkle some fresh grated parmesan on top of the oil (helps it stick).  Makes for delicious crust where the toppings don't reach.  I don't always do it, but it does taste delicious when I do!


Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Brush Oil on the Crust?
« Reply #10 on: September 21, 2012, 02:47:58 PM »
Just a word of caution here. If you make your own garlic infused olive oil (I'm sure most of us do), remember that it is not a good idea to save it from one day to the next due to the possibility of growing clostridium in the anaerobic environment created by the oil. Clostridium is soil borne, so the garlic can be potentially contaminated with it. Clostridium can result in botulism poisoning. Botulism is too deadly, and olive oil is too cheap to take any chances. Our advice is to play it safe and dispose of any unused home made garlic infused oil at the end of each day. Commercially produced garlic infused oil is perfectly safe to hold from one day to the next.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor