Author Topic: Pizza Oven in Outdoor Kitchen Project  (Read 12105 times)

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Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Oven in Outdoor Kitchen Project
« Reply #40 on: December 11, 2012, 07:56:16 PM »
Rent a rubber tire/track mini back hoe.....
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"


Offline Reep

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Re: Pizza Oven in Outdoor Kitchen Project
« Reply #41 on: December 11, 2012, 07:59:27 PM »
I actually will see if the loader on mine can clear the fence with the pieces attached.  That would be easier to control.  If it doesn't, then I'll have to find some friends.  How many of us 40 to 50 year olds have friends with good backs?
« Last Edit: December 11, 2012, 08:02:14 PM by Reep »

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Oven in Outdoor Kitchen Project
« Reply #42 on: December 11, 2012, 08:29:35 PM »
Since you're a patent attorney you probably still have lots of friends....offer a free pizza party to their strapping youngsters.... ;)
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline ForrestM

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Re: Pizza Oven in Outdoor Kitchen Project
« Reply #43 on: December 11, 2012, 08:45:16 PM »
Awesome!  Thanks for keeping us updated.  I look forward to watching your progress.

Offline breadstoneovens

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Re: Pizza Oven in Outdoor Kitchen Project
« Reply #44 on: December 18, 2012, 09:32:41 PM »
Lifting the pieces into place takes about 2 to 3 people with a 2x4 that you pass through the metal wire loops. 2 young and strong guys with good backs to lift and one to guide them. I usually do the guiding  :-D
It is harder when the stand is kind of high-up. Then it is more like 3 or 4 people with a couple of 2x4. It is helpful to set-up either a little step-stool or scaffolding.
But it is so rewarding when it is all done  ;D

WFO cooking is about passion.

Offline Reep

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Re: Pizza Oven in Outdoor Kitchen Project
« Reply #45 on: December 19, 2012, 11:43:29 PM »
Thanks Antoine.  I tried horsing around a couple of the floor pieces tonight and couldn't even budge them by myself.  I guess that puts it into perspective.  I guess I need to start promising pizza to a lot of friends because all mine have mid-life backs.

Antoine, in Robyn's installation, it looks like she has a bottom ceramic insulation, then a concrete looking layer, then the floor of the oven.  For mine it looks like I am to use two layers of the ceramic insulation and then the oven floor, is that correct?
« Last Edit: December 19, 2012, 11:51:40 PM by Reep »

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Oven in Outdoor Kitchen Project
« Reply #46 on: December 20, 2012, 12:13:01 AM »
Reep, what up 'ol boy? Did you let your gym membership go ...slack!   ;D
j/k dude...git er done man, you gonna enjoy it.  :chef:
Bob
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline breadstoneovens

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Re: Pizza Oven in Outdoor Kitchen Project
« Reply #47 on: December 20, 2012, 08:33:48 PM »
Antoine, in Robyn's installation, it looks like she has a bottom ceramic insulation, then a concrete looking layer, then the floor of the oven.  For mine it looks like I am to use two layers of the ceramic insulation and then the oven floor, is that correct?

It takes 2 people to move the floor pieces and more like 3 for the dome pieces. Just spend all day doing just that.

Yes, you are correct for the floor installation.
Robin actually had something called vermiculite insulation which is standard with the older model of FGM ovens imported to the US.
Since I took over the import I told FGM to keep their vermiculite floor insulation. I personally add ceramic fiber board when the ovens arrive to my warehouse.  It is a little more expensive but a lot more efficient and easier to work with. Quality, only quality.

Yours is the same as Robyn's installation in the fashion that you will put the insulation, 2" total of ceramic fiber boards, 2 layers of the 1" thick boards. Over the insulation you will put the concrete floor and then the refractory brick tiles over it.
I have seen the center concrete piece of the concrete floor a little lower than the the front and back piece before. So when you will put the brick tiles you may need to put a little of the refractory clay between the tiles and the concrete to slightly raise them.

Call me if you have any question during the instal.

Antoine

WFO cooking is about passion.

Offline Reep

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Re: Pizza Oven in Outdoor Kitchen Project
« Reply #48 on: December 21, 2012, 11:45:25 AM »
Thanks Antoine.  The installation should be easy, and I think I may only need one guy.  Chicago Bob goes to the gym often and I think he will be able to come down and place the pieces by himself.   :angel:

I will probably end up doing it on three stages.  First have my pizza loving friend over to help place the floor.  Second, set the floor tiles, and third, bring in some big guys to help put the dome pieces in place.  Mine will be a bit tricky because the back side of the oven platform drops another 18" so I may have to set up some scaffolding on that side in order for them to lift it high enough.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Oven in Outdoor Kitchen Project
« Reply #49 on: December 21, 2012, 01:10:35 PM »
Sounds like a plan.  ;)
"mid-life backs"....you crack me up Mr. Reep.  ;D
Hope it all goes smoothly for you. Call if you run into any snags.
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"


Offline Reep

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Re: Pizza Oven in Outdoor Kitchen Project
« Reply #50 on: January 01, 2013, 01:31:06 AM »
Finally got some help getting the foundation layer in.  Tomorrow I work with the sand and the oven floor.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2013, 01:33:25 AM by Reep »

Offline Reep

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Re: Pizza Oven in Outdoor Kitchen Project
« Reply #51 on: January 01, 2013, 04:28:31 PM »
I started assembling the cooking tiles.  First, here are a few things I noticed that were less than perfect.  Not big problems, but less than perfect.

The first picture shows the alignment of the oven floor.  It is a bit stair stepped, which I thought would make balancing the floor a problem as each piece is higher toward the back of the oven than the front.  

The second picture shows a typical tile.  For each square tile, one edge was slightly bowed, which made really tight joints not possible.  

The third picture shows a fairly good gap at the back of the first joint. 

Additionally, a couple tiles had very minor chips in the corners (I put them toward the outside) and some major chips on the bottom side (which did not show).  Some had some big scratches and brick buildup on the bottom, which I had to remove with a rasp or they would not sit flat.  Another observation is that each tile appears to be slightly higher in the middle than on the edges, which ends up making fewer rough edges even though the joints aren't super tight.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2013, 04:36:35 PM by Reep »

Offline Reep

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Re: Pizza Oven in Outdoor Kitchen Project
« Reply #52 on: January 01, 2013, 04:35:18 PM »
Now on the the first version of the floor and some questions. 

The first picture shows the whole floor (looks longer than it is due to wide angle lens).

The next three pictures show the floor height with a strait edge. 

Questions:

1) If I rub my hand over the surface, I really don't hit any big snags even though there are some gaps in the tiles and some highs and lows.  I did not perceive any place where a pizza or peel would catch on an edge.  Is that good enough?

2)  A couple tiles wobble a bit corner to corner (less than 1 mm of play), should I use sand to prevent that or just let it be as it doesn't provide any catch spots and the tiles will likely expand and contract anyway?

3)  Are the gaps between the tiles a concern?  I assume they will fill up with ash at some point.  Is a tighter fit more desirable?

4)  The gaps on the sides are quite large (1-2 cm).  Should I cut brick to put in there?  Put mortar and sand mixture?  Or, let it just fill up with ash?

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Pizza Oven in Outdoor Kitchen Project
« Reply #53 on: January 01, 2013, 04:40:50 PM »
If you don't get an answer, send a PM to [Tom] Tscarborough.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline breadstoneovens

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Re: Pizza Oven in Outdoor Kitchen Project
« Reply #54 on: January 01, 2013, 05:04:19 PM »
Hi Reep,

Forum members are welcome to comment with their expertise, but here is my answer.
The tiles are hand made which makes them so durable and ensure the high quality, yet they do have very slight default to the eye if put against a straight edge. A few extra tiles are provided just in case there is some damage during the shipping or too great of an imperfection on a tile.
Machine made tiles may appear perfect to the eye but will show their default once exposed to the heat.

1) Yes, it is just fine and I can guaranty you that the result when cooking will be perfect
2) As described in the installation guide you can put a little of the refractory clay,mixed with sand, under the wobbly tiles to level it perfectly. But with something of 1 mm or less, you can just let it as is. Once you start burning the wood, it will settle nicely
3) The tiles need that space to freely expend and retract. Once you will have cured your oven, any of the minor gap you describe will be barely visible.
4) As described in the installation guide you need to fill the gap on the perimeter of the floor where the tiles and the concrete meet with the refractory clay. Do not fill the space with bricks, this space is necessary as well so the tiles can expend and retract (otherwise they will crack over time). Once you place the dome, part of the gap will be covered.

Let me know if you need anything else.

Antoine


WFO cooking is about passion.

Offline Reep

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Re: Pizza Oven in Outdoor Kitchen Project
« Reply #55 on: January 01, 2013, 05:19:19 PM »
Thanks Antoine.  I will say that it went together much easier than I anticipated.  If tiles were perfectly cut with exact edges, I think it would be almost impossible to get a surface with no catches.  I was a bit surprised that just placing them in with no sand did provide a surface that I could rub my hand around and not discern any catch points.

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Pizza Oven in Outdoor Kitchen Project
« Reply #56 on: January 01, 2013, 11:00:12 PM »
Ideally they would be at a 45 degree angle, but since they are already in, I wouldn't worry about it.  Gaps no problem.   You could get a grinding cup and smooth it off, but I am not convinced that it makes much difference, and unless you have more than 1/4" vertical difference between tiles I wouldn't bother..
« Last Edit: January 01, 2013, 11:06:09 PM by Tscarborough »

Offline Reep

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Re: Pizza Oven in Outdoor Kitchen Project
« Reply #57 on: January 05, 2013, 06:49:48 PM »
Okay, I reset the floor today with the sand/mortar mix.  Took a bit of time and is not perfect, but was an improvement.  Not that it matters a lot, but using the sand and mortar lifted the whole floor so now the floor is perfectly level with the entry tiles, rather than below them.  Before it was probably 95% of perfect, now it is probably 97%.  Close enough for me.

There is only one dodgy place and that is on the far left side where my fire will be.  I would post a picture, but it looks the same as above so no point.

Lesson learned: use the finest sand you can find.  I had troubles in a couple of thin spots with big pieces of sand acting as a fulcrum and had to pull the tile, remove the stone, and reset.

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Pizza Oven in Outdoor Kitchen Project
« Reply #58 on: January 06, 2013, 04:18:29 PM »
Yes, the size of the sand is a function of the desired joint, ideally, it will be 1/4 to 1/3, Maximum, of the desired joint.  It still needs to be graded from that size down, though (not consistently sized).

Offline Reep

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Re: Pizza Oven in Outdoor Kitchen Project
« Reply #59 on: February 28, 2013, 11:06:53 AM »
It looks like we are on for installation of the dome tomorrow morning (finally!).  I'll try and get pictures and update the thread.   

Caputo 00 and San Marzano tomatoes are waiting in the kitchen. :drool: Since I still have to put the insulation on, get some utensils and some wood, they may be waiting a while longer.


 

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