Author Topic: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza  (Read 119735 times)

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Offline autodesigner

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Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #100 on: May 23, 2008, 11:43:27 PM »

Nice....looks like the real deal!


Online Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #101 on: May 24, 2008, 10:02:41 AM »
Jad,

Is the photo of the large pizza or one of the smaller ones? Also, what size pan have you been using?

As far as sugar is concerned, most members (and I would say most Americans) tend to use ordinary table sugar (sucrose) in their pizza doughs, such as the one you made. It is possible to use caster sugar, which is similar to our "superfine" sugar, but since its grain size is smaller than table sugar, you may not need as much (by volume) as the recipe calls for. It is also possible to substitute raw sugar for table sugar in the recipe you used. On my mini scale, a level teaspoon of raw sugar weighs about the same as a level teaspoon of table sugar, so you should be able to swap one out for the other. However, you may want to dissolve the raw sugar in the formula water to be sure that is distributed uniformly throughout the dough.

To get more crust color at the sides and top edges, you might try oiling the sides of the pan and also the exposed top rim of the dough. If you are not using a dark anodized pan or a seasoned pan darkened by long term use, using such a pan might also help. You can also try baking the pizza at a lower temperature for a longer period of time. That combination may help dry the crust out a bit and make it more crispy. Moving the pizza to a higher oven position toward the end of the bake to get more top heat and a darker, crispier rim is another possibility.

Peter

« Last Edit: May 24, 2008, 10:10:08 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline Jad

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #102 on: May 24, 2008, 10:39:55 AM »
Hi Peter,
 
The photo is a large pizza. Perhaps my YouTube video might give you a better perspective. :) ...

youtube.com/watch?v=gkn-bzuONjY

I cooked it in a 17" non-stick deep pan. I don't have an oven at the moment that does 500 F which is about 260 C from memory, so I cooked it at 220 C. I actually used caster sugar for both attempts so I am yet to try the table or raw sugar. I figured the taste difference between caster and table sugar would be minimal but the raw might create a noticeably different taste, for better or worse.

Thanks for all your advice its been great. I'll definitely add some oil to the top edges & sides and perhaps cook it even longer than I already do. I might set it to 200 C and see how that goes.

Thanks again!

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #103 on: May 24, 2008, 10:55:27 AM »
Jad,

Thanks for the link. For the convenience of others, the direct link is .

Did you use the 17" deep dish pan to make the smaller pizzas also? What size were the smaller pizzas? I think it should be possible to tailor the recipe you used to the pan(s) you are using. What kind of flour did you use to make the pizzas? All-purpose (or whatever you call it in Australia)?

Peter
« Last Edit: May 24, 2008, 12:06:07 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Bread Maker

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #104 on: May 24, 2008, 01:36:53 PM »
I can feel my arteries blocking up already but hey, if it tastes good right?  :chef:

Dang right.  :) Hope you post back again.

Offline Bryan S

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #105 on: May 24, 2008, 04:22:09 PM »
Hi Peter,
 
The photo is a large pizza. Perhaps my YouTube video might give you a better perspective. :) ...

youtube.com/watch?v=gkn-bzuONjY

I cooked it in a 17" non-stick deep pan. I don't have an oven at the moment that does 500 °F which is about 260 °C from memory, so I cooked it at 220 °C. I actually used caster sugar for both attempts so I am yet to try the table or raw sugar. I figured the taste difference between caster and table sugar would be minimal but the raw might create a noticeably different taste, for better or worse.

Thanks for all your advice its been great. I'll definitely add some oil to the top edges & sides and perhaps cook it even longer than I already do. I might set it to 200 °C and see how that goes.

Thanks again!
Jad, I have found that 425 works the best for pan pizza on the middle rack. I cook it for 22-25 min. I give the pan a 180 spin after about 10-12 min. HTH
Making great pizza and learning new things everyday.

Offline Jad

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #106 on: May 24, 2008, 06:43:31 PM »
Dang right.  :) Hope you post back again.

Haha fair call.

So far I'm ok.

 :-D


Jad, I have found that 425 works the best for pan pizza on the middle rack. I cook it for 22-25 min. I give the pan a 180 spin after about 10-12 min. HTH

Actually that's funny cos' I spin the pan around 180 anyway. Not because of a cooking technique but because my oven is broken atm and I'm using a little electronic pizza oven that doesn't quite fit the 17" deep pan tray. One side is always sticking out and not getting cooked properly so I kinda gotta do it. Tastes so good though.

If you can recommend a good tomato based sauce for a pepperoni styled pizza I'd love to hear it. One of the best pizzas I had was actually at the Vatican in Rome! The base source was to die for (heaven forbid) >:D :chef:

Offline Jad

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #107 on: May 26, 2008, 05:07:55 PM »
The raw sugar idea didn't work. :'(

The dough seemed fine in texture and all that but even after being shrink wrapped in a tray for a couple of hours at room temperature it didn't rise one iota. I stuck it in the fridge overnight just to see how it would go. I had a look in the morning (just now) and it's unchanged. I'm 99% sure I did everything identical except the raw sugar idea instead of caster sugar. I used much warmer water this time, to help mix the raw sugar through properly. Perhaps it was too hot? I don't know.

Oh well, back to caster sugar I guess.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #108 on: May 26, 2008, 05:43:00 PM »
Jad,

I believe you may have missed my Reply 103 earlier in this thread.

As for the raw sugar, I don't see any reason why the dough didn't work using that form of sugar. If the dough didn't rise at all, that suggests that the water temperature may have been too high--possibly so high that it severely damaged the yeast. ADY is supposed to be rehydrated in water at around 105 degrees F for about ten minutes. Anything materially above or below that temperature--by even five or ten degrees--for a 10-minute rehydration period will degrade the performance of the yeast. ADY, like other forms of yeast, will die when the rehydration temperature is around 143 degrees F. What happens to the ADY between say, 120 degrees F and 143 degrees F, will depend on the actual temperature of the water and how long the ADY is in the water. If you didn't use a thermometer to measure the water temperature, next time you may want to do so. Of all the problems that users have with ADY, according to the yeast producers the most common is incorrect water temperature.

Peter

Offline Jad

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #109 on: May 27, 2008, 11:46:05 PM »
Ah thanks Peter, it must have been the hot water then. :-[

I read your post (103) and yes I used the same pan/s. This was my 3rd attempt. My first attempt was the really tall pizza which tasted great but was twice a thick as any pizza here in AUS, as far as dough goes. In the 2nd attempt I was using exactly the same tools and ingredients except this time I split the dough in two once it was fully kneaded and rolled them out (12") for 2 17" pizza trays instead of just the one. This was my best batch so far, as height and taste were very very close to Pizza Hut Deep Pan downunder style. The 3rd attempt was again two pizzas, same tools and ingredients, only raw sugar this time and hotter water in the mix. It is this 3rd attempt that has failed.

So what I've down now is made my 4th batch for two 17" pizzas with raw sugar instead of caster sugar and I used the same water temperature as I did with the first two batches which were successful. So basically the only difference in this 4th batch is the different type of sugar. The dough is in the air tight trays now and it looks like they are rising to the occasion thank goodness! :chef:

I'll let you know in about 6 hours how it all went. ;D


Offline Jad

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #110 on: May 28, 2008, 06:27:34 AM »
Success!!

I might be biased but I think the raw sugar is the way to go. I could taste a distinct difference for the better.

Thanks again Peter, and others, for all your help with this. I am very grateful, and so it my stomach. ;D


Online Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #111 on: May 28, 2008, 09:04:07 AM »
Jad,

It looks like you are well on your way. Congratulation. Your results look very good.

Did you change anything else in making your pizza, like using a different oven temperature or oven position? Since you rolled out the dough to 12" and used your 17" pan, I assume that there was no point in oiling the sides of your pan to get more crust color or crispiness.

It's entirely up to you, but if you want to get closer from a dough weight standpoint to the real thing, you might consider trying the dough formulation at Reply 6 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909. That formulation will give you 22 ounces of dough (that is rolled out to 12"), whereas the recipe you used gives you around 18.5 ounces of dough. Unfortunately, you will need to use a scale to weigh out the flour and water in the abovereferenced modified dough formulation. For the rest of the ingredients, you can use the volume measurements, however they would be converted to the Australian system of measurements.

Peter

Offline Bread Maker

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #112 on: May 28, 2008, 02:09:02 PM »
Success!!

I might be biased but I think the raw sugar is the way to go. I could taste a distinct difference for the better.

Thanks again Peter, and others, for all your help with this. I am very grateful, and so it my stomach. ;D



Nice!

Offline markkubis

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #113 on: July 13, 2008, 08:01:14 PM »
I've made the Pan Pizza using the ingredients listed by xPHmgr at the start of this thread.

I halved the quantity of all ingredients as listed and made a 12" pizza. I omitted the powdered milk. I used 15% protein flour, the flour I also use to make NY style pizza. The dough weighed 18.5 Oz. I used 1/4 cup of oil in the pan.

Rolled out the dough was 1/4" thick at 10" diameter. After resting in the fridge overnight and baking the following morning the resulting crust was 1/2" thick at 12" diameter, the ideal thickness for a pan pizza in my opinion.

I cooked it at Gas mark 8 (450F) for 30 minutes on a pre-heated baking stone of 1" thickness on the middle shelf of my gas oven.

It was truly excellent and definitely better than a PH crust. The 1/4 cup of oil in the pan was the perfect amount for a 12" tray.

« Last Edit: July 13, 2008, 08:19:07 PM by markkubis »

Offline abacaba

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #114 on: October 05, 2008, 12:52:42 AM »
Is it possible for someone to help me change this into a bread machine recipe?  Thanks.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #115 on: October 05, 2008, 10:21:08 AM »
Is it possible for someone to help me change this into a bread machine recipe?  Thanks.

abacaba,

Bread machines vary, but if your model can handle 4 1/2 cups of flour and about 37 ounces total dough, I don't see any reason why you shouldn't be able to use the basic dough cycle of your machine to make the dough. In my machine, the sequencing of ingredients for the PH clone recipe you are considering would be water, flour (bread flour), sugar, dry milk, salt, oil, and yeast (ADY). If I were to use my bread machine, I would monitor the dough knead time and pull the dough once it comes together into a smooth, cohesive ball. Hopefully that would be at around 10 minutes as the recipe calls for. I don't think I would let the dough go out to the total knead time programmed into the machine (for my machine, a Zojirushi, the total knead time is closer to 14 minutes). Some machines allow for programming knead times so that is an option if your machine can be so programmed.

In my case, I might also be inclined to use cold water so that the kneading doesn't overheat the dough.

If you decide to proceed, I hope you will let us know how things turn out. There are many members with bread machines who may be interested in your results, as well as any suggestions that you might have for improvement.

BTW, if your particular bread machine can't handle around 37 ounces of dough, it is a fairly simple matter to convert the recipe to produce a smaller amount of dough--essentially any amount you want to make. I can help you with this if you need assistance.

Peter
« Last Edit: October 05, 2008, 10:29:25 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline abacaba

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #116 on: October 05, 2008, 05:38:00 PM »
Thanks, Pete-zza, I have a Black and Decker bread machine which uses a 2 hour cycle time.  It includes the rising process.  Do you mean I should pull it out after 10 minutes of kneading?  Also, I believe it can handle 37 ounces of dough...but I was planning on making it 44 to make 2 doughs.  Also, should I add in the oil as it is kneading like what the recipe says or not?

I plan on making the pizza on friday or saturday but I might change my plans.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #117 on: October 05, 2008, 05:46:32 PM »
abacaba,

If you plan to follow the instructions as given, I would remove the dough after about 10 minutes, although in your case it may be a bit longer if you decide to make 44 ounces of dough instead of around 37 ounces.

As for the oil, I would add it as part of the normal sequencing of ingredients for your particular bread machine. I would not add the oil after the kneading begins.

Peter


Offline abacaba

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #118 on: October 06, 2008, 01:30:48 AM »
mmm...thanks.  I forgot to ask if bread machine yeast will make a difference from the regular yeast?  I only have bread machine yeast at home.

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #119 on: October 06, 2008, 09:58:20 AM »
mmm...thanks.  I forgot to ask if bread machine yeast will make a difference from the regular yeast?  I only have bread machine yeast at home.

abacaba,

The instructions for some machines, like mine, recommend that ADY be used for the basic dough setting and that a "rapid rise" yeast be used for the "quick" dough setting. I have no idea as to which is better for the dough you plan to make. You can try the bread machine yeast since you already have it and see how you like the results. Fortunately, ADY can be found in just about every supermarket. You perhaps should check the instructions that came with your machine to see what the manufacturer of that machine recommends.

Peter


 

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