Author Topic: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza  (Read 121572 times)

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Offline xPHmgr

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #180 on: June 15, 2010, 11:33:25 AM »
Thanks... I'm glad that it has worked out well for people.

The irony is that I actually prefer the Thin' N Crispy crust... and I have had one heck of a time trying to exactly duplicate it... but I'm back on the hunt and will let you know if I am able to duplicate it.  I think my initial attempts have been quite a bit off from the science of flour, moisture and pizza dough... but I don't give up easily...  :D

Randy, I'll have to give that a try some time... I've never tried to make a Chicago style pizza before but the Pan pizza dough would probably be really good dough for that...


Offline chillin

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #181 on: July 06, 2010, 01:17:46 AM »
Does anybody know what the adjustment would be for high altitude (>5,000ft)?

Offline hopingforpizza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #182 on: February 07, 2011, 02:01:05 PM »
Just a quick note after reading this thread (which has been informative to say the least) is about the question of weather or not to proof/double rise this dough.   I think it's more of a question of crumb than it is flavor.  Using a controlled rise will produce a nice flavor under most circumstances, but in this case the crumb has to be almost "just so".  I am a huge fan of PH pan pizzas and the combination of light texture, medium to medium fine crumb and that perfectly fried finish is indeed it's own.  I think if you try to make this guy w/ a single rise method the crumb will be too coarse and it just won't have that deep-fried twinkie kind of liteness that we all know and love ; ).   One other thing to try too would be to use a high quality vegetable shortening rather than straight oil as it adheres up the sides of the pan at or below room temp and seems to give the sides of the crust about the same treatment as the bottom.   Just my thoughts.     Enjoy Everyone!

Offline awlingbeck

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #183 on: February 15, 2011, 10:23:45 AM »
Every Pizza Hut Deep Pan Pizza dough I've seen shows oil in the recipe and when I made the dough at Pizza hut we didn't add any oil to the dough, only water and the powder they sent us.  We however did add vegetable oil to the pan for cooking purposes (enough to coat the bottom of the pan with about 1/8 of an inch seemed a bit excessive to most of us working there) before adding the dough to the pan and placing it in the proofer at 95 degrees F for about 90 minutes and another 90 minutes in the refrigerator to cool.  The cooling process was to make the dough firm for adding toppings to it otherwise the dough was thin in the middle. If you ever get the actual pans Pizza hut uses for pan dough you will see 2 lines on the inside of the pan that show where the dough should rise to during the proofing process.  If I remember correctly it was 16 ounces of dough for a 12" pizza and 22 ounces for a 14 inch pizza rolled out evenly before being placed in the pan.

My other favorite dough is Stuffed Crust, however I've been a little bummed about finding a non commercial "garlic butter spray" that we used for spraying on the crust.  Anyone have any ideas where to find something like that?  Pam creates a butter spray, but doesn't taste the same as the garlic butter spray.

Offline awlingbeck

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #184 on: February 15, 2011, 10:49:31 AM »
Peter:
sorry won't let me quote you because of the hyperlink

Lots of interesting stuff there, You are right that most dough is not made in the stores any more.  However I do believe that some smaller towns still make the dough by hand because it saves them on their food cost.  The cost of buying the frozen dough is prohibitive to some stores because they cannot keep their food cost under the specific gross sales percent that the companies would like them to have.  I remember having to spend many hours preparing dough for the night shift, since all extra dough was thrown out for the next day per policy, however sometimes it got used on the buffet for the next morning. When I first started working at the particular Pizza Hut I worked at we had 2 sometimes 3 people preparing dough for the day because we were making the "Bigfoot" Pizza then which for some reason our town loved and others did not.  We would go through a minimum of 100 of them a day where other towns wouldn't use 100 in a week. Now they have the "Dippers" which look like the same size as the Bigfoot.  The Dippers looks more like a pan dough though where the Bigfoot was a hand tossed style dough.  The difference being there were holes in the bottom of the pan for the Bigfoot and just sprayed with a food release product and the dippers appears to have oil in the pan causing the "fry bread" appearance and taste.  

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #185 on: February 15, 2011, 10:52:42 AM »
awlingbeck,

Can you tell us how long ago it was that you worked for PH and made their pan pizzas? The reason I ask is that some time ago I found a PH ingredients document, which I printed out for my own use, that showed oil in the dough. I did a Google search this morning and found the document (pdf) at http://www.espanol.pizzahut.com/menu/nutritioninfo/documents/ph_ingredients.pdf. That document is dated July 29, 2004. The ingredients for the pan pizza dough are set forth at page 4. One of the things I noticed in the ingredients list for the pan pizza dough is the omission of water. It is hard to say whether that was an omission or it was intentional (note that two of the other dough ingredients lists also omit the water). If it was intentional, that could suggest that the ingredients shown were part of a dry mix, hence the omission of the water. It is quite common to include a spray dried form of oil for such mixes. I can't say that that was what PH was using but it can't be ruled out as a possibility. It's also possible that the PH document mentioned above was for locations outside of the U.S. You will note, for example, the inclusion of the word "espanol" in the URL for the document.

Your information on the dough weights for the two size pizzas confirms what other former PH employees have stated on the forum.

Once you get to five posts, you should be able to include links in your posts.

Peter

Offline matermark

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #186 on: March 10, 2011, 01:00:44 PM »
Just a quick note after reading this thread (which has been informative to say the least) is about the question of weather or not to proof/double rise this dough.   I think it's more of a question of crumb than it is flavor.  Using a controlled rise will produce a nice flavor under most circumstances, but in this case the crumb has to be almost "just so".  I am a huge fan of PH pan pizzas and the combination of light texture, medium to medium fine crumb and that perfectly fried finish is indeed it's own.  I think if you try to make this guy w/ a single rise method the crumb will be too coarse and it just won't have that deep-fried twinkie kind of liteness that we all know and love ; ).   One other thing to try too would be to use a high quality vegetable shortening rather than straight oil as it adheres up the sides of the pan at or below room temp and seems to give the sides of the crust about the same treatment as the bottom.   Just my thoughts.     Enjoy Everyone!

Funny you should mention that, because my local Pizza Hut always brushed shortening into the pan--while waiting for my pizza to get done, I always observed them brushing a white colored shortening or lard--never have I seen them pouring any oil!

Ever since then, I incorporate the same procedure on my double crust "Old Forge White Pizzas."
« Last Edit: March 10, 2011, 01:02:34 PM by matermark »

Offline xsosx

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #187 on: October 17, 2011, 03:40:49 PM »
This is my first attempt at making a Pizza Hut pan pizza clone. I generally make New York-style pizzas but my family loves Pizza Hut. The recipe I used for this was the 22 ounce scaled version that Pete-zza calculated in another thread. My directions are as follows:

The yeast was added to the water and allowed to activate and dissolve for 10 minutes. Next, I mixed in the salt, sugar, and dry non-fat milk. This combination was poured into a KitchenAid mixer followed by flour and vegetable oil. After a 10 minute kneed using the hook attachment, I let the dough rest, covered, inside the mixing bowl for 10 minutes before rolling it out into a 12-inch circle. The dough was then placed into a Chicago Metallic Non Stick 14-Inch Deep Dish Pizza Pan (epicalien recommended this pan earlier in this thread) with 4 ounces of vegetable oil placed in the bottom. The top was covered using plastic wrap and the dough was proofed for 1 hour. Afterwards, I placed the dough into the refrigerator for approximately 12 hours. It was removed 2 hours before baking.

I preheated the oven to 500F with a FibraMent stone placed on the middle rack. Before topping, I slightly depressed the middle of the dough, leaving a 1 inch edge-crust. The pizza was topped with Jackie Tran's sauce recipe, which was a near-perfect imitation of Pizza Hut's. I used 2 cups of low moisture part skim mozzarella (though I saw an ex-Pizza Hut employee say that they used 3 cups on their large pan pizzas, 4.5 if it's a cheese pizza). Half of the cheese was put on top of the sauce, followed by diced onions and green peppers, then the other half of the cheese. I finished topping it with pepperonis. Before going into the oven, I sprayed the edge crust with a vegetable oil cooking spray. The pizza was baked for 12 minutes on the stone.

The pizza turned out great and it will be a recipe that I try again in the future. Thanks to everyone who put in effort on cloning this!

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #188 on: October 17, 2011, 04:01:18 PM »
xsosx

That is a beautiful looking pizza. Congratulations. It looks like you followed the directions well.

Peter

Offline matermark

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #189 on: October 17, 2011, 08:03:40 PM »
Hey that looks great! Now next time bring it up to SUPER Supreme specs and let me know when it's ready and I'll give you ten bucks! ;)


Offline johnamus

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #190 on: October 18, 2011, 08:26:17 AM »
That is a great looking pizza, how did the taste compare to the real deal?

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #191 on: October 18, 2011, 09:11:24 AM »
Xsosx, that looks better than the real deal.  Congrats, I'm sure it ate very well.

Chau

Offline xsosx

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #192 on: October 19, 2011, 05:18:19 PM »
Hey that looks great! Now next time bring it up to SUPER Supreme specs and let me know when it's ready and I'll give you ten bucks! ;)

Haha. I do plan on using more toppings next time.

That is a great looking pizza, how did the taste compare to the real deal?

Thank you! It was very close the the original, especially the crust texture. I wish I had taken a photo of the underside, because it had that fried dough, golden-brown look and feel that is a very distinguishing feature of Pizza Hut pan pizza.

Xsosx, that looks better than the real deal.  Congrats, I'm sure it ate very well.

Thank you for your sauce recipe. The whole pizza was gone within 15 minutes!

I'm not sure if anyone can answer this question but is the pan dough the same dough that Pizza Hut uses for their breadsticks?

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #193 on: October 19, 2011, 06:53:48 PM »
Xsosx, I'm pretty positive the dough for their pan pizza is the same for their breadsticks.  If not it is very similar.  I have made breadsticks with this dough with good results.

Offline FeCheF

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #194 on: November 15, 2011, 01:50:02 PM »
My wife recently bought me a 16" heavy duty cake pan so can someone scale this recipe up for me please (pete  :D). Im not good with baker percents though, so if you could use grams that would be appreciated.

And Xsosx, your pie looks fabulous.

« Last Edit: November 15, 2011, 01:51:54 PM by FeCheF »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #195 on: November 15, 2011, 02:11:25 PM »
FeCheF,

I explain how to do the conversion at Reply 140 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,213.msg84184.html#msg84184. In your case, you want to use the thickness factor 0.14291 in the expanded dough calculating tool (the Thickness Factor option) along with the 16" pizza size. If you have trouble coming up with the dough formulation for your 16" pizza pan or you would like me to review your numbers, let me know.

Peter

Offline FeCheF

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #196 on: November 15, 2011, 02:46:25 PM »
FeCheF,

I explain how to do the conversion at Reply 140 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,213.msg84184.html#msg84184. In your case, you want to use the thickness factor 0.14291 in the expanded dough calculating tool (the Thickness Factor option) along with the 16" pizza size. If you have trouble coming up with the dough formulation for your 16" pizza pan or you would like me to review your numbers, let me know.

Peter

Peter, I used the percents in replay 140 link above and came up with this formula but i dont know if its correct because im not sure if im supposed to use the same percents as a 14" or if somehow supposed to calculate a higher percentages? Im kinda lost when it comes to these percents. I really dont know how to calculate this.Anyway I tried that expanded dough calculator and here is the results.

Flour (100%):
Water (55.555%):
ADY (1.18518%):
Salt (0.875%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (4.27199%):
Sugar (1.875%):
Dry Non-Fat Milk (2.35155%):
Total (166.11372%):
490.39 g  |  17.3 oz | 1.08 lbs
272.44 g  |  9.61 oz | 0.6 lbs
5.81 g | 0.21 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.54 tsp | 0.51 tbsp
4.29 g | 0.15 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.77 tsp | 0.26 tbsp
20.95 g | 0.74 oz | 0.05 lbs | 4.61 tsp | 1.54 tbsp
9.19 g | 0.32 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.31 tsp | 0.77 tbsp
11.53 g | 0.41 oz | 0.03 lbs | 8.02 tsp | 2.67 tbsp
814.6 g | 28.73 oz | 1.8 lbs | TF = 0.14291

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #197 on: November 15, 2011, 02:55:01 PM »
FeCheF,

You done good ;D. Now I look forward to your results.

Peter

Offline FeCheF

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #198 on: November 15, 2011, 03:09:06 PM »
FeCheF,

You done good ;D. Now I look forward to your results.

Peter

Thanks peter, but are the percentages correct for a 16" pan?

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #199 on: November 15, 2011, 03:21:07 PM »
Thanks peter, but are the percentages correct for a 16" pan?

Yes, they are. The baker's percents are the same for all pan sizes.

Peter