Author Topic: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza  (Read 119670 times)

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Offline Foccaciaman

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Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #60 on: March 22, 2004, 06:12:27 PM »
Upper crust a little burnt but delicious.
Actually used mix of two sauces one mixed with toppings and the diced tomato mixture on top with parmesean and italian breadcrumbs. I am not sure where I saw the breadcrumbs thing but it is Sicilian, I think, it gives a great texture right on top of the sauce.

onions,green pepper,sweet peppers, pepperoni,sausage,mushrooms, provolone,mozzerella

I was actually shocked at how good it turned out. with exception of the edge.
Oh, and I used Extra Virgin and Canola mixed for the pan, good taste. ;D
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Offline Randy

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Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #61 on: March 22, 2004, 08:16:42 PM »
Adult beverage and hot peppers too I see.
Looks tatsty!
Randy

Pizzacko

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Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #62 on: March 22, 2004, 09:52:31 PM »
Hey thanks guys... u know I think I learn more stuff in here than in a school. Anyways, I found a restaurant supplies store near me and I'm gonna go check em' out. Anyways, I appreciate the help. Thanks.

P.S.
You kick ass stock. Thanks fpr goin through the trouple to find the pans on the net. Appreciate it.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2004, 09:53:25 PM by Pizzacko »

lucifer

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Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #63 on: May 25, 2004, 12:23:33 AM »
Have learnt a lot lurking in this forum - it's great!

As cannot at this stage assist with recipes, I have enhanced the photo of the slice of pizza pictured earlier in this thread, to bring it up to life like colour level (i hope  :))

Offline Steve

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Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #64 on: May 25, 2004, 07:57:41 AM »
Thanks, lucifer!  :)
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Offline Foccaciaman

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Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #65 on: May 25, 2004, 09:18:32 AM »
Come out of the shadows Lucifer all are welcome.
 ;D
Ahhh, Pizza The Fifth Food Group

That Damn Swede

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #66 on: June 02, 2005, 09:10:03 AM »
Hey, I'm trying out this recipe as we speak. However, the dough will not rise after two hours at room temperature. Did you use cold water in your recipe? I assumed it was cold as you didn't mention anything else. Normally when you use dried powder yeast, you're supposed to use tempered water, at maybe 125F. I'm from Sweden, so I'm beginning to wonder if we have a different type of dried yeast powder over here...

Offline Randy

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #67 on: June 02, 2005, 10:33:43 AM »
Place it in a warm place say 80F and it should work for you but next time try a water temperature of around 90F.

Hope this helps.

Randy

That Damn Swede

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #68 on: June 02, 2005, 11:18:11 AM »
All right, thank you. I've placed the pizzas on top of my stove and they're slowly coming to life. Maybe you should add water temperature to the recipe.

Also, I wonder what's the purpose, if any, of placing the dough in the fridge for som many hours?

:)

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #69 on: June 02, 2005, 11:47:17 AM »
The reason for the long period of refrigeration is mainly for flavor. Although the activity of the yeast slows down during refrigeration, it is still alive and produces alcohol and other byproducts of fermentation. Also, there is bacteria (e.g., lactobacillus) that also continue to function during refrigeration and produce a wide range of acids and other compounds that contribute to the flavor of the finished crust. You can usually smell a lot of those fermentation byproducts.

Refrigeration of dough also allows you to control when you want to use the dough. Most doughs will hold during refrigeration for about 48 hours and, in some cases, as long as 3 or 4 days, but you have to be sure that there is enough sugar in the dough to go out beyond 48 hours. The yeast continues to feed on the sugar all that time.

Peter


Offline Randy

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #70 on: June 02, 2005, 01:06:36 PM »
A good point about the temperature I will see if he is still on list and maybe he could clarify the temperature.

Randy

Offline Randy

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #71 on: June 02, 2005, 01:11:04 PM »
I sent him an email but he has not been active in the last several months.

Randy

Offline xPHmgr

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #72 on: June 02, 2005, 11:49:10 PM »
I did not measure the temperature of the water that I used to make the recipe.  However it was warm to hot but not so hot as to kill the yeast.  I have a Kitchen Aid mixer.  What I do is run my hot water until it is fairly warm/hot and then I rinse out the mixer bowl in order to raise the temperature of the bowl.  Then I measure out the correct amount of water and add it to the prewarmed bowl.  Sorry but I do not measure the temperature of the water but it is definitely very warm... just be careful not to make it too warm that you kill the yeast.

Offline xPHmgr

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #73 on: June 03, 2005, 08:15:28 AM »
I went back and read the question asked regarding refrigerating the dough for so many hours before using it.

I do not know specifically why it was done that way at PH but I suspect it was mostly because of the way they ran their business.  They made their dough in the morning and then used it throughout the day... and so it allowed them to stop the rise process (or at least severely retard it) and make it usable for a longer period of time.

The other thing I noticed that it does is when it is used fresh (not refrigerated yet) the dough is very easily compressed by the handling and toppings.  After it has been refrigerated it seems to be less suspectable to loosing the air bubbles in the dough.

Hope that helps...

Offline Randy

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #74 on: June 07, 2005, 11:30:22 AM »
On the recipe page should it read 90 -110 water temp XPHmgar?

Randy

Offline richdo

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Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza - advice please
« Reply #75 on: July 06, 2005, 07:32:45 PM »
I could use some help here , please.

I tried the recipe, halved to make a 9x9" pizza.  My crust was mushy, and my toppings burned. 

Any ideas?

Like, should i put the dough in alone first ... and at that, coat it with something?  Does it matter how thick my pan is?  I used thin aluminum.  Does it need to be heavier? 

Thanks,
Rich

Offline Albright

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #76 on: August 21, 2005, 05:16:19 AM »
Why the pizza edge have many small bubble?

And i see PizzaHut's pizza edge color is golden,not brown like pic.

Offline Brandon

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #77 on: August 24, 2005, 11:23:56 AM »
I made this recipie twice this past weekend.  Once it was pretty poor, but the second time it was perfect.  Here's what I did.

***how I altered the recipe***
The first time (not very good):
I followed the directions as closely as I could.  I used a 16 inch pan rather than a 14, but my crust was still 1.5 inches high.  The pizza baked and when it was done it had 1.5 inches of thick biscuity dough  for crust (biscuity pizza crust = very bad, and 1.5 inches of crust = way too much).

The second time (very good):
I used the dough to make 2 pizzas this time because I figured I had at least twice as much crust as I needed in my first attempt.  I let the dough rise and refrigerate in dough balls rather than in the oiled pan.  This pizza turned out a lot like the Pizza Hut Pan Pizza.  If I had to taste both with  my eyes closed, I probably could have told a difference, but honestly, they were very very close. 

Both times, it didn't take near the 1/2 cup of oil the recipie states to cover the bottom of my 16 inch pan.  In fact I'd bet 1/4 cup would be more than enough.  I still got a consistently golden and crispy fried crust bottom.

***stupid mistakes I made/fixed***
On the first pizza, I poured my flour into a big measuring cup an tapped the cup on the counter to level out the dough.  This was probably a huge novice mistake as I bet I ended up getting way more flour than I needed, which probably resulted in the biscuity dough.  On the second pizza, I shook the flour out of the bag lightly and leveled it off by pushing it around with a spoon, rather than tapping it and packing it all down.  The second dough ball, while not wet or sticky at all, was definately not as dry as the first was.

***Things I noticed***
I still don't see how you could possibly want all that dough on one pizza.  I love Pizza Hut Pan Pizza and I've had plenty of them, but I've never seen one with 1.5 inch thick crust.  I don't mean puffy crust around the edge, I mean 1.5 inches under every square inch of sauce and cheese.

In the second effort, I halved the dough and made 2 pizzas.  The first one in a pan with oil, and the second on a screen.  The oiled one had a brown crispy bottom to its crust, while the other had a more uniform crust.  Both were good thick crusts, so the oil is only neccessary if you want that fried brown bottom crustiness.

The first pizza sat in the oiled pan overnight, the second pizza was formed and put into an oiled pan just before baking, and both came out with a good bottom crust.   Thus.. the time the dough is in the oil doesn't seem to have any significant effect on the final outcome.

By not having the dough rise in the pan, you have an opportunity to allow for a ridge of crust when you flatten out your dough ball.  When it rises in the pan, it rised uniformly across its area and you have a flat, boring crust.  Imagine something like a 16inch pancake where the center is even a little bit higher than the edges (due to rising).  Then you top that and call it a pizza?  It looks very funny without any hint of edge crust.  I guess you do the "in-pan" rise to not compress the dough when shaping the ball into the pan, but I didn't notice any detrimental compression in my second doughs.  If I were to do a pan rise, and forfeit a well defined crust rim, I'd certainly still split the recipie to make 2 crusts instead of just one.

***In Conclusion***
I'll definately make this recipe again.  I'll be gentle with my flour, I should probably even sift it I guess.  And I'll surely make 2 dough balls for 2 crusts rather than just one.  I may or may not do the oiled pan thing, depending on my mood.
« Last Edit: August 24, 2005, 11:29:25 AM by Brandon »

Offline Lydia

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #78 on: August 31, 2005, 04:56:03 PM »
This recipe turned out pretty darn good.

I doubled the recipe and used LaRomanella High-gluten flour. Cant get pendelton-fisher brand anymore  :'(.

But what really threw me off was the " Bake at 500F ON A PIZZA STONE" for 14 minutes.

I did this, with dough in pan, against my better judgment. My bottom crust didn't brown properly.

Should the directions have said to bake, then slide dough out onto stone???
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Offline Spud

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #79 on: September 18, 2005, 12:06:06 AM »
I've tried this recipe with mixed results many times over the last few weeks. The main problem is like the above post, it comes out more like a 2" loaf of bread (way too much) I remember at PH (I was a driver) when I made the personal pan for my employee meal we pressed the dough down with this plastic disk before sausing and topping. I can't remember if the cooks flattened the larger sizes in the middle. Are we suppose too?
Another problem I'm having almost every time is the dough being done on top but gummy in the center just below the sauce. The bottom of the crust is usually just short of being cooked to the right amount. I've started with the 500 degrees on the stone, then 450, then 425, this last time I tried it at 450 again but without the stone. (also this is in a cast iron skillet) but the same results. 

So in short... do we mash down the center after it comes out of the fridge in the pan.
and
why is the center gummy and the top done?

Thanks 


 

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