Author Topic: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza  (Read 141089 times)

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Offline slybarman

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Re: Re: Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #225 on: January 10, 2013, 06:37:25 PM »
Steven 86 cast iron pan method looks pretty good, no?  1 post above yours...

LOL. Good thing it didn't have teeth or it would have bit my nose. I am not sure I get the point of putting the skillet on top of a pizza stone. Is it for heat transfer?


Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #226 on: January 10, 2013, 06:43:01 PM »
Well, sorta...it transfers the heat more evenly.  ;)
But if one does not have a stone...the cast iron pan's qualities(thick)help even browning/cooking alone by itself.

Also, for the 1.5oz oil coating on bottom of skillet I would not use olive oil...your favorite regular 'ol oil will be fine. Throw some corn, veg, or canola and crisp that baby up.   8)
« Last Edit: January 10, 2013, 06:51:09 PM by Chicago Bob »
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Offline slybarman

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Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #227 on: January 10, 2013, 07:08:21 PM »
Thanks Bob. I must have skipped the entire middle of this thread when I read it. I just saw the pictures of n powerwagonpete's pie in cast iron and it looked very good.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #228 on: January 10, 2013, 07:14:30 PM »
Yep, Pete's got it go'in on.  :chef:
Even the professionals(like..not me!) miss some specs from time to time...it's natural!  8)
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Offline slybarman

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Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #229 on: January 11, 2013, 11:14:53 PM »
I have my first tries in the refrigerator for the cold rise.  The dough looked ok to me. Man that sure seems like a lot of oil in the pan. Fingers crossed.

I was thinking about the powdered milk. Doesnt it just rehydrate and become milk?  What is the benefit of powdered milk over regular milk?

Offline slybarman

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #230 on: January 12, 2013, 02:26:29 PM »
Not a success, but not a total failure either. The taste was decent, but I ended up with way too much dough relative to sauce cheese. the dough way just too thick. I used the recipe in the original post and split it into two 9" pans (lodge logic calls it a 9" pan, but the actual cooking surface is about 7 1/2" diameter). I think I could have done four pies from the recipe. The pan in the picture is 1 3/4" deep.

Because the crust was too thick, it did not really cook enough all the way through. Cutting the thickness in half or so should fix that.

Also, I think the oil could be cut in about half.

I have photos but gave up on trying to upload them to the site. The server was having none of it.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #231 on: January 12, 2013, 03:15:12 PM »
I was thinking about the powdered milk. Doesnt it just rehydrate and become milk?  What is the benefit of powdered milk over regular milk?

Steve,

I am a little bit late on this but pretty much everything you want to know about milk in a dough can be read in this recent PMQ Think Tank post by Tom Lehmann: http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?p=84770&sid=6533e396c0801023e2f7c7ae9b386694#p84770.

For several years, before Pizza Hut went to frozen dough in the U.S., it used dry milk products in some of its doughs. These days, there aren't many chains or pizza operators who do so. Vito & Nick's, who specialize in the Chicago thin-crust style pizza, use fresh milk, as do some pizza operators who specialize in the Greek-style pizza. Round Table used dry milk in its dough at one point and may still be doing so, and I believe that Donatos went from fresh milk to dry milk.

Peter

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #232 on: January 12, 2013, 03:21:44 PM »
So adding 1% grocery store dry milk will not add any favorable effects on the dough.....hmmm.
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Offline slybarman

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Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #233 on: January 12, 2013, 03:31:25 PM »
I saw earlier in the thread someone said the whey contributed to browning. Is there a difference in whey between powdered milk and liquid milk?


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #234 on: January 12, 2013, 03:34:15 PM »
Not a success, but not a total failure either. The taste was decent, but I ended up with way too much dough relative to sauce cheese. the dough way just too thick. I used the recipe in the original post and split it into two 9" pans (lodge logic calls it a 9" pan, but the actual cooking surface is about 7 1/2" diameter). I think I could have done four pies from the recipe. The pan in the picture is 1 3/4" deep.

Because the crust was too thick, it did not really cook enough all the way through. Cutting the thickness in half or so should fix that.

Steve,

A lot of members had trouble with the amount of dough called for in the original PH pan dough recipe.  For that reason, I scaled the recipe down to the actual amount of dough that PH was using for its 14" size pizza. You can see the scaled down version at Reply 6 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909. The thickness factor for that recipe is 0.14291. If you use that thickness factor in the expanded dough calculating tool along with all of the other numbers (baker's percents) in the recipe in Reply 6 referenced above, you should be able to make as many pizzas as you would like and in any desired size.

Peter

Offline slybarman

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Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #235 on: January 12, 2013, 03:56:15 PM »
Cool - thanks peter.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #236 on: January 12, 2013, 04:04:35 PM »
I saw earlier in the thread someone said the whey contributed to browning. Is there a difference in whey between powdered milk and liquid milk?

Steve,

I can't say for sure but I would imagine if that you add back the right amount of water to reconstitute the particular dried form of milk (whole, nonfat, reduced-fat, etc.), the whey content should be the same unless the drying process destroyed part of the whey. If you research the different forms of liquid milk at the NutritionData.Self website at http://nutritiondata.self.com/, you will see that the range of water content for the different forms of milk is about 87-89%.

Peter

Offline slybarman

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #237 on: January 12, 2013, 04:10:23 PM »
Good info Peter.

I used the dough calculator as you suggested. My 9" cast iron pans have a 7 1/2" cooking surface. I am not sure if that means I should use a 7 1/2" pie in the calculator or something smaller as the original recipe called for making a 12" dough for the 14" pan. Of course, I don't know if his 14" pan actually had a 14" cooking surface! Aye caramba.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #238 on: January 12, 2013, 04:38:57 PM »
I used the dough calculator as you suggested. My 9" cast iron pans have a 7 1/2" cooking surface. I am not sure if that means I should use a 7 1/2" pie in the calculator or something smaller as the original recipe called for making a 12" dough for the 14" pan. Of course, I don't know if his 14" pan actually had a 14" cooking surface! Aye caramba.
Steve,

You can see how the thickness factor and pan sizes are used in the expanded dough calculating tool at Reply 140 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,213.msg84184.html#msg84184. Since your dimensions suggest that your cast iron pans have sloping sides, with the major diameter being 9" and the minor diameter being 7 1/2", you might want to use something between those two numbers in the expanded dough calculating tool. Maybe 8" or 8 1/4" will do the trick. You can always tweak the numbers further in the future if you generally like the results you get.

In case you end up liking your next PH pan pizza, you might also want to take a look at a cross between the PH pan pizza and the Godfather's pizza as discussed starting at Reply 15 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12806.msg132091.html#msg132091. Jet_deck (Gene) decided to try the formulation I set forth in Reply 15 but threw me a curveball when he said that he wanted to substitute evaporated milk for the dry milk powder. That led to the changes described in Reply 19 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12806.msg132454.html#msg132454. You can see Gene's results starting at Reply 25 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12806.msg132648.html#msg132648. With a different pan size, some rejiggering of the numbers would be required.

Peter

Offline slybarman

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #239 on: January 12, 2013, 05:03:44 PM »
Good info as always Pete. If I plug in numbers for 2 dough balls at 8" I get

Flour (100%):    247.99 g  |  8.75 oz | 0.55 lbs
Water (55.555%):    137.77 g  |  4.86 oz | 0.3 lbs
ADY (1.18518%):    2.94 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.78 tsp | 0.26 tbsp
Salt (.875%):    2.17 g | 0.08 oz | 0 lbs | 0.39 tsp | 0.13 tbsp
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (4.27199%):    10.59 g | 0.37 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.33 tsp | 0.78 tbsp
Dry Non-Fat Milk (2.35155%):    5.83 g | 0.21 oz | 0.01 lbs | 4.06 tsp | 1.35 tbsp
Total (164.23872%):   407.3 g | 14.37 oz | 0.9 lbs | TF = 0.14291
Single Ball:   203.65 g | 7.18 oz | 0.45 lbs

That is a little more than 1/3 the size of the OP.   ;)

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #240 on: January 12, 2013, 05:11:35 PM »
If the Dough Doctor says that anything under 5% dry milk addition will not make any difference in the dough why do I see small amounts being used on many forum recipes?
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Offline slybarman

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #241 on: January 13, 2013, 06:43:57 PM »
100% improvement tonight. Pete - your bakers %s for the dough calculator really saved the day.

Crust thickness was right on and taste and texture were right on too.

Thanks guys. the kiddies were happy.

The reason the cheese looks funny on the pepperoni pie is because I ran out of cheese and had to cut up some of the kids cheese stick to finish it off.  :-[
« Last Edit: January 13, 2013, 06:45:35 PM by slybarman »


Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #242 on: January 13, 2013, 07:45:42 PM »
Looks great Steve. Must be whole milk "cheese stick". Shred and blend both types together and I'll bet you'd be pretty close to PH cheese... ;)
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Offline slybarman

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #243 on: January 13, 2013, 07:56:43 PM »
Ha - I need to get off my butt and get back up to the restaurant supply house for a big bag of decent cheese.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #244 on: January 14, 2013, 07:47:12 AM »
If the Dough Doctor says that anything under 5% dry milk addition will not make any difference in the dough why do I see small amounts being used on many forum recipes?

Bob,

That is a very good question.

According to what Tom has said, there is some dough strengthening effect even when using below 5% dry milk. That might help if the dough is to be run through a sheeter or roller of some sort but I tend not to think that that is why some pizza operators use dry milk. I think that a lot of pizza operators just decided to add some milk to their dough, simply because they had it or maybe to satisfy their curiosity. They perhaps liked the results, or perceived such, and just decided to continue to use it and the recipe eventually became a family or legendary recipe to be handed down from generation to generation and guarded like it was Fort Knox. It might have also been used as a differentiating factor. For example, for years, Donatos boasted about the health effects of the milk in their dough (and eggs as well). They no longer do that. At Vito & Nick's in the Chicago area, milk (fresh milk) is a hallmark ingredient for their dough for their famous Chicago thin-crust pizza. I don't think they would ever dare to leave the milk out of their dough. Their customers would be picketing the joint. I might add that V&N uses a roller for their skins so the milk (at around 12% of the flour weight by my calculation) may have a beneficial effect for that purpose.

In Pizza Hut's case, I do not believe that they ever used dry milk alone, or at least I could never find any evidence of it. As I noted at Reply 1 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8791.msg76201/topicseen.html#msg76201, I believe that PH was using a dairy blend. The pdf link in Reply 1 is no longer active but you can see a typical PH dough formulation using the dairy blend for its pan dough at page 4 of the pdf document at http://www.espanol.pizzahut.com/menu/nutritioninfo/documents/ph_ingredients.pdf. That is an old document but represented what PH was doing before it went to frozen dough for most of its pizzas (in the U.S.). Later, it appears that they abandoned the dairy blend but continued to use whey, as can be seen in this 2008 pdf document: http://www.pizzahut.com/files/pdf/pizza%20hut%20ingredient%20statements%20september%202008.pdf. That document is after PH went to frozen dough. Pizza Hut has stopped publishing pdf documents for its ingredients so it is hard to say exactly what they are now using in their doughs. Since their current doughs are loaded with chemicals, that is perhaps no great loss.

If Steve (slybarman) would like to replicate the "old" and, arguably, "better" PH pan dough, without all the chemicals. he might consider using a dairy blend.  Dutch Valley uses to sell it but I could not find it among the products at its website this morning. But I found another source: http://www.roundeyesupply.com/Land-O-Lakes-Superheat-All-Dairy-Blend-p/de127782.htm. Or Steve can make his own dairy blend using the same ingredients. His kids will thank him for the added nutrition.

Peter

EDIT (4/20/13): For the Wayback Machine link to the above Pizza Hut pdf document, see http://web.archive.org/web/20100602083641/http://www.pizzahut.com/Files/PDF/PIZZA%20HUT%20INGREDIENT%20STATEMENTS%20September%202008.pdf
« Last Edit: April 20, 2013, 06:44:44 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #245 on: January 14, 2013, 09:07:09 AM »
Thanks Peter.
I do use about 11% milk(liquid 2%)in my Chicago thins and around 5%(dry powdered) in cracker crusts. I "perceive" a difference and like using it in my doughs. Maybe Steve will try it and tell us what he thinks....
Bob
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Offline slybarman

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Re: Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #246 on: January 14, 2013, 09:40:05 AM »
Steve can make his own dairy blend using the same ingredients. His kids will than him for the added nutrition.

My kids eat their boogers. I think it fairly unlikely they will thank me over nutrition.  ;D

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #247 on: January 14, 2013, 10:05:50 AM »
My kids eat their boogers.
Steve,

That subject matter is more appropriately placed in the Off-Topics Food board ;D.

Peter

Offline slybarman

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Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #248 on: January 14, 2013, 02:32:30 PM »
Steve,

That subject matter is more appropriately placed in the Off-Topics Food board ;D.

Peter

Quite right. Touché Peter.

Offline Pizzamaster

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #249 on: January 16, 2013, 04:55:44 AM »
If the Dough Doctor says that anything under 5% dry milk addition will not make any difference in the dough why do I see small amounts being used on many forum recipes?

Just because something was published in a book doesn't mean it it's better or gospel.