Author Topic: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza  (Read 118472 times)

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Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #240 on: January 12, 2013, 05:11:35 PM »
If the Dough Doctor says that anything under 5% dry milk addition will not make any difference in the dough why do I see small amounts being used on many forum recipes?
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Offline slybarman

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #241 on: January 13, 2013, 06:43:57 PM »
100% improvement tonight. Pete - your bakers %s for the dough calculator really saved the day.

Crust thickness was right on and taste and texture were right on too.

Thanks guys. the kiddies were happy.

The reason the cheese looks funny on the pepperoni pie is because I ran out of cheese and had to cut up some of the kids cheese stick to finish it off.  :-[
« Last Edit: January 13, 2013, 06:45:35 PM by slybarman »

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #242 on: January 13, 2013, 07:45:42 PM »
Looks great Steve. Must be whole milk "cheese stick". Shred and blend both types together and I'll bet you'd be pretty close to PH cheese... ;)
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Offline slybarman

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #243 on: January 13, 2013, 07:56:43 PM »
Ha - I need to get off my butt and get back up to the restaurant supply house for a big bag of decent cheese.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #244 on: January 14, 2013, 07:47:12 AM »
If the Dough Doctor says that anything under 5% dry milk addition will not make any difference in the dough why do I see small amounts being used on many forum recipes?


Bob,

That is a very good question.

According to what Tom has said, there is some dough strengthening effect even when using below 5% dry milk. That might help if the dough is to be run through a sheeter or roller of some sort but I tend not to think that that is why some pizza operators use dry milk. I think that a lot of pizza operators just decided to add some milk to their dough, simply because they had it or maybe to satisfy their curiosity. They perhaps liked the results, or perceived such, and just decided to continue to use it and the recipe eventually became a family or legendary recipe to be handed down from generation to generation and guarded like it was Fort Knox. It might have also been used as a differentiating factor. For example, for years, Donatos boasted about the health effects of the milk in their dough (and eggs as well). They no longer do that. At Vito & Nick's in the Chicago area, milk (fresh milk) is a hallmark ingredient for their dough for their famous Chicago thin-crust pizza. I don't think they would ever dare to leave the milk out of their dough. Their customers would be picketing the joint. I might add that V&N uses a roller for their skins so the milk (at around 12% of the flour weight by my calculation) may have a beneficial effect for that purpose.

In Pizza Hut's case, I do not believe that they ever used dry milk alone, or at least I could never find any evidence of it. As I noted at Reply 1 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8791.msg76201/topicseen.html#msg76201, I believe that PH was using a dairy blend. The pdf link in Reply 1 is no longer active but you can see a typical PH dough formulation using the dairy blend for its pan dough at page 4 of the pdf document at http://www.espanol.pizzahut.com/menu/nutritioninfo/documents/ph_ingredients.pdf. That is an old document but represented what PH was doing before it went to frozen dough for most of its pizzas (in the U.S.). Later, it appears that they abandoned the dairy blend but continued to use whey, as can be seen in this 2008 pdf document: http://www.pizzahut.com/files/pdf/pizza%20hut%20ingredient%20statements%20september%202008.pdf. That document is after PH went to frozen dough. Pizza Hut has stopped publishing pdf documents for its ingredients so it is hard to say exactly what they are now using in their doughs. Since their current doughs are loaded with chemicals, that is perhaps no great loss.

If Steve (slybarman) would like to replicate the "old" and, arguably, "better" PH pan dough, without all the chemicals. he might consider using a dairy blend.  Dutch Valley uses to sell it but I could not find it among the products at its website this morning. But I found another source: http://www.roundeyesupply.com/Land-O-Lakes-Superheat-All-Dairy-Blend-p/de127782.htm. Or Steve can make his own dairy blend using the same ingredients. His kids will thank him for the added nutrition.

Peter

EDIT (4/20/13): For the Wayback Machine link to the above Pizza Hut pdf document, see http://web.archive.org/web/20100602083641/http://www.pizzahut.com/Files/PDF/PIZZA%20HUT%20INGREDIENT%20STATEMENTS%20September%202008.pdf
« Last Edit: April 20, 2013, 06:44:44 AM by Pete-zza »

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #245 on: January 14, 2013, 09:07:09 AM »
Thanks Peter.
I do use about 11% milk(liquid 2%)in my Chicago thins and around 5%(dry powdered) in cracker crusts. I "perceive" a difference and like using it in my doughs. Maybe Steve will try it and tell us what he thinks....
Bob
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Offline slybarman

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Re: Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #246 on: January 14, 2013, 09:40:05 AM »
Steve can make his own dairy blend using the same ingredients. His kids will than him for the added nutrition.

My kids eat their boogers. I think it fairly unlikely they will thank me over nutrition.  ;D

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #247 on: January 14, 2013, 10:05:50 AM »
My kids eat their boogers.
Steve,

That subject matter is more appropriately placed in the Off-Topics Food board ;D.

Peter

Offline slybarman

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Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #248 on: January 14, 2013, 02:32:30 PM »
Steve,

That subject matter is more appropriately placed in the Off-Topics Food board ;D.

Peter

Quite right. Touché Peter.

Offline Pizzamaster

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #249 on: January 16, 2013, 04:55:44 AM »
If the Dough Doctor says that anything under 5% dry milk addition will not make any difference in the dough why do I see small amounts being used on many forum recipes?

Just because something was published in a book doesn't mean it it's better or gospel.


Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #250 on: January 16, 2013, 10:04:25 AM »
Just because something was published in a book doesn't mean it it's better or gospel.
What the  ???
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Offline Pizzamaster

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #251 on: January 16, 2013, 04:04:51 PM »
What the what lol? You're saying everything your grandma or mom or whomever made when you were a kid came out of a book? That everything you make is prepared by someone else's standard? There is no one right way to do things is all I said. If someone likes more or less of something and it works for them that doesn't mean it's wrong.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #252 on: January 16, 2013, 08:27:07 PM »
What the what lol? You're saying everything your grandma or mom or whomever made when you were a kid came out of a book? That everything you make is prepared by someone else's standard? There is no one right way to do things is all I said. If someone likes more or less of something and it works for them that doesn't mean it's wrong.
Actually, I was questioning what was written. And I didn't read it in a book, Peter linked to something said at PMQ by our very own Tom Lehmann "The Dough Doctor" http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,213.msg231564.html#msg231564

But it's all good Pizzamaster... ;)
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Offline pythonic

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #253 on: June 12, 2013, 08:17:24 PM »
This is my first attempt at making a Pizza Hut pan pizza clone. I generally make New York-style pizzas but my family loves Pizza Hut. The recipe I used for this was the 22 ounce scaled version that Pete-zza calculated in another thread. My directions are as follows:

The yeast was added to the water and allowed to activate and dissolve for 10 minutes. Next, I mixed in the salt, sugar, and dry non-fat milk. This combination was poured into a KitchenAid mixer followed by flour and vegetable oil. After a 10 minute kneed using the hook attachment, I let the dough rest, covered, inside the mixing bowl for 10 minutes before rolling it out into a 12-inch circle. The dough was then placed into a Chicago Metallic Non Stick 14-Inch Deep Dish Pizza Pan (epicalien recommended this pan earlier in this thread) with 4 ounces of vegetable oil placed in the bottom. The top was covered using plastic wrap and the dough was proofed for 1 hour. Afterwards, I placed the dough into the refrigerator for approximately 12 hours. It was removed 2 hours before baking.

I preheated the oven to 500F with a FibraMent stone placed on the middle rack. Before topping, I slightly depressed the middle of the dough, leaving a 1 inch edge-crust. The pizza was topped with Jackie Tran's sauce recipe, which was a near-perfect imitation of Pizza Hut's. I used 2 cups of low moisture part skim mozzarella (though I saw an ex-Pizza Hut employee say that they used 3 cups on their large pan pizzas, 4.5 if it's a cheese pizza). Half of the cheese was put on top of the sauce, followed by diced onions and green peppers, then the other half of the cheese. I finished topping it with pepperonis. Before going into the oven, I sprayed the edge crust with a vegetable oil cooking spray. The pizza was baked for 12 minutes on the stone.

The pizza turned out great and it will be a recipe that I try again in the future. Thanks to everyone who put in effort on cloning this!


Peter.

I want to make this one but ferment time is only 12hrs.  I want to do a 24hr cold ferment instead.  How should I adjust the yeast?
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #254 on: June 13, 2013, 12:05:04 PM »
I want to make this one but ferment time is only 12hrs.  I want to do a 24hr cold ferment instead.  How should I adjust the yeast?
Nate,

The answer depends on whether you make your dough in the same way and under the same conditions as xsosx did. While we know how xsosx made and managed the dough for his pizza, we don't know at what temperature the dough fermented. We can only assume that his dough went from room temperature into a refrigerator that might have been at around 40 degrees F. If you make and manage your dough exactly like xsosx did and your refrigerator temperature is around 40 degrees F, I would simply cut the amount of ADY in half, to reflect your longer fermentation window. If your refrigerator temperature runs higher or lower than normal, you will have to tweak the amount of ADY in one direction or the other to compensate.

Peter

Offline pythonic

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #255 on: June 13, 2013, 08:22:37 PM »
Nate,

The answer depends on whether you make your dough in the same way and under the same conditions as xsosx did. While we know how xsosx made and managed the dough for his pizza, we don't know at what temperature the dough fermented. We can only assume that his dough went from room temperature into a refrigerator that might have been at around 40 degrees F. If you make and manage your dough exactly like xsosx did and your refrigerator temperature is around 40 degrees F, I would simply cut the amount of ADY in half, to reflect your longer fermentation window. If your refrigerator temperature runs higher or lower than normal, you will have to tweak the amount of ADY in one direction or the other to compensate.

Peter

Ok thanks.
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Offline pythonic

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #256 on: June 15, 2013, 03:38:26 PM »
Peter.



Peter,

I want to make a 12' pie using the pan below.  Is your recipe for a 12' or 14'?  I also forgot to mention I will be using IDY instead.  How does that change my yeast amount for a 24hr ferment?

Nate
« Last Edit: June 15, 2013, 03:42:21 PM by pythonic »
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #257 on: June 15, 2013, 03:53:46 PM »
I want to make a 12' pie using the pan below.  Is your recipe for a 12' or 14'?  I also forgot to mention I will be using IDY instead.  How does that change my yeast amount for a 24hr ferment?

Nate,

The recipe you referenced is for a 14" pan. For the 12" pan, you perhaps want to use the recipe as recited at Reply 12 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg62351.html#msg62351. The amount of yeast (ADY) for the 12" pan recipe is 1.18518%. That converts to about 0.90% IDY. So long as you make and manage the dough like xsosx did, and assuming roughly the same temperatures, I would cut the 0.90% figure in half, or 0.45% IDY.

Please let us know how things work out with those changes.

Peter

Offline pythonic

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #258 on: June 15, 2013, 04:24:33 PM »
Thanks again Peter.  I'm making this on Tues so I will be sure to post pics.

Nate
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Offline pythonic

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #259 on: June 16, 2013, 09:51:24 PM »
Peter,

Do u think this aluminum American metal craft or my dark Chicago metallic pan will produce the best results?  I want to also make a test pizza in a 9in pan.  I saw in another thread u referenced that a 14in was 22oz, 12in was 16oz.  Am I to assume that a 9in would be 9-10oz?

Nate
« Last Edit: June 16, 2013, 10:15:16 PM by pythonic »
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