Author Topic: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza  (Read 140884 times)

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Offline richdo

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Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza - advice please
« Reply #75 on: July 06, 2005, 07:32:45 PM »
I could use some help here , please.

I tried the recipe, halved to make a 9x9" pizza.  My crust was mushy, and my toppings burned. 

Any ideas?

Like, should i put the dough in alone first ... and at that, coat it with something?  Does it matter how thick my pan is?  I used thin aluminum.  Does it need to be heavier? 

Thanks,
Rich


Offline Albright

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #76 on: August 21, 2005, 05:16:19 AM »
Why the pizza edge have many small bubble?

And i see PizzaHut's pizza edge color is golden,not brown like pic.

Offline Brandon

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #77 on: August 24, 2005, 11:23:56 AM »
I made this recipie twice this past weekend.  Once it was pretty poor, but the second time it was perfect.  Here's what I did.

***how I altered the recipe***
The first time (not very good):
I followed the directions as closely as I could.  I used a 16 inch pan rather than a 14, but my crust was still 1.5 inches high.  The pizza baked and when it was done it had 1.5 inches of thick biscuity dough  for crust (biscuity pizza crust = very bad, and 1.5 inches of crust = way too much).

The second time (very good):
I used the dough to make 2 pizzas this time because I figured I had at least twice as much crust as I needed in my first attempt.  I let the dough rise and refrigerate in dough balls rather than in the oiled pan.  This pizza turned out a lot like the Pizza Hut Pan Pizza.  If I had to taste both with  my eyes closed, I probably could have told a difference, but honestly, they were very very close. 

Both times, it didn't take near the 1/2 cup of oil the recipie states to cover the bottom of my 16 inch pan.  In fact I'd bet 1/4 cup would be more than enough.  I still got a consistently golden and crispy fried crust bottom.

***stupid mistakes I made/fixed***
On the first pizza, I poured my flour into a big measuring cup an tapped the cup on the counter to level out the dough.  This was probably a huge novice mistake as I bet I ended up getting way more flour than I needed, which probably resulted in the biscuity dough.  On the second pizza, I shook the flour out of the bag lightly and leveled it off by pushing it around with a spoon, rather than tapping it and packing it all down.  The second dough ball, while not wet or sticky at all, was definately not as dry as the first was.

***Things I noticed***
I still don't see how you could possibly want all that dough on one pizza.  I love Pizza Hut Pan Pizza and I've had plenty of them, but I've never seen one with 1.5 inch thick crust.  I don't mean puffy crust around the edge, I mean 1.5 inches under every square inch of sauce and cheese.

In the second effort, I halved the dough and made 2 pizzas.  The first one in a pan with oil, and the second on a screen.  The oiled one had a brown crispy bottom to its crust, while the other had a more uniform crust.  Both were good thick crusts, so the oil is only neccessary if you want that fried brown bottom crustiness.

The first pizza sat in the oiled pan overnight, the second pizza was formed and put into an oiled pan just before baking, and both came out with a good bottom crust.   Thus.. the time the dough is in the oil doesn't seem to have any significant effect on the final outcome.

By not having the dough rise in the pan, you have an opportunity to allow for a ridge of crust when you flatten out your dough ball.  When it rises in the pan, it rised uniformly across its area and you have a flat, boring crust.  Imagine something like a 16inch pancake where the center is even a little bit higher than the edges (due to rising).  Then you top that and call it a pizza?  It looks very funny without any hint of edge crust.  I guess you do the "in-pan" rise to not compress the dough when shaping the ball into the pan, but I didn't notice any detrimental compression in my second doughs.  If I were to do a pan rise, and forfeit a well defined crust rim, I'd certainly still split the recipie to make 2 crusts instead of just one.

***In Conclusion***
I'll definately make this recipe again.  I'll be gentle with my flour, I should probably even sift it I guess.  And I'll surely make 2 dough balls for 2 crusts rather than just one.  I may or may not do the oiled pan thing, depending on my mood.
« Last Edit: August 24, 2005, 11:29:25 AM by Brandon »

Offline Lydia

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #78 on: August 31, 2005, 04:56:03 PM »
This recipe turned out pretty darn good.

I doubled the recipe and used LaRomanella High-gluten flour. Cant get pendelton-fisher brand anymore  :'(.

But what really threw me off was the " Bake at 500F ON A PIZZA STONE" for 14 minutes.

I did this, with dough in pan, against my better judgment. My bottom crust didn't brown properly.

Should the directions have said to bake, then slide dough out onto stone???
The roundest knight at King Arthur's round table was Sir Cumference.They say he acquired his size from eating too much pi.

Offline Spud

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #79 on: September 18, 2005, 12:06:06 AM »
I've tried this recipe with mixed results many times over the last few weeks. The main problem is like the above post, it comes out more like a 2" loaf of bread (way too much) I remember at PH (I was a driver) when I made the personal pan for my employee meal we pressed the dough down with this plastic disk before sausing and topping. I can't remember if the cooks flattened the larger sizes in the middle. Are we suppose too?
Another problem I'm having almost every time is the dough being done on top but gummy in the center just below the sauce. The bottom of the crust is usually just short of being cooked to the right amount. I've started with the 500 degrees on the stone, then 450, then 425, this last time I tried it at 450 again but without the stone. (also this is in a cast iron skillet) but the same results. 

So in short... do we mash down the center after it comes out of the fridge in the pan.
and
why is the center gummy and the top done?

Thanks 

Offline Brandon

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #80 on: September 23, 2005, 01:59:17 PM »
@spud

I don't know if it makes  a lot of difference, but I'm always heating up my sauce before it goes on the pizza.  I start with just plain tomato sauce and add basil, garlic, thyme, salt and pepper, oregano.  Anyway, the sauce is hot when it goes on the dough.  So when the pie goes into the oven, it doesn't have a layer of room temperature sauce soaking up all the top-down heat before it gets to the top of the dough.  So I bet heat gets to the dough through the sauce quicker since the sauce is alreay hot. 

As far as the 2 inches of crust goes.. yup, that's nasty isn't it.  I just split the dough ball and make 2 crusts.  If you make two 12-in pans, they'll still both have a good thick crust

Offline lox450

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Really messed up
« Reply #81 on: December 14, 2006, 08:46:45 AM »
I tried this recipe last night for the dough....I will go thru the process of what I did.

1. used warm to hot water and kneeded for 10 minutes with my hands...(I do not own a mixer)

2. I put the dough in an oiled pan and covered with cling wrap.  I let it rest for 4 hours. 

I got back to the pan and to be honest...it didn't rise too much.  Now granted..my house is rather cold this time of year due to being in Wisconsin.  But I didn't think it would have THAT big of an effect on the rise.   I just tried to punch it out as best I could and it barely touches the sides of the pan.  I will try to cook it tonight.   Do any of you know what part I messed up the worst?? 

Offline giotto

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #82 on: December 14, 2006, 12:43:30 PM »
When I first started to make the Pizza Hut style deep dish pizza, I found that the restaurants used a proofer that was set to around 100F. So after the dough sits in a pan overnight, it is placed in the proofer for about an hour. I have tried it with and without a top during this proof stage, and it has not seemed to make much of a difference. The dough is then pushed down and placed in the oven at about 455F.

So I follow this procedure and put it in the oven for an hour at 100F first, using a formula similar to what is posted on the first page here. I then run my oven between 455F and 475F, due to inefficiencies for maybe 12 minutes.  I've used KA all-purpose flour, bread flour, and a mix of the two. It all comes out great. The only time it failed is when I used Harvest King, which supersedes the gold medal best of bread (company recommends it for puff pastries and soft rolls on its site). Unlike KA, it produces a dense structure that I just do not care for with this pizza.

With KA flour, the deep dish crust has a golden hue color, and is almost transparent when you bite down into it, with a slightly crispy outer edge. There is no difference between it and Pizza Hut deep dish. Here's an example:

Bottom: http://home.comcast.net/~keck-foundation1/phut.JPG

 ::)
« Last Edit: December 14, 2006, 02:20:28 PM by giotto »

Offline sonicdrink

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #83 on: December 16, 2006, 09:15:49 PM »
When I first started to make the Pizza Hut style deep dish pizza, I found that the restaurants used a proofer that was set to around 100F. So after the dough sits in a pan overnight, it is placed in the proofer for about an hour. I have tried it with and without a top during this proof stage, and it has not seemed to make much of a difference. The dough is then pushed down and placed in the oven at about 455F.

So I follow this procedure and put it in the oven for an hour at 100F first, using a formula similar to what is posted on the first page here. I then run my oven between 455F and 475F, due to inefficiencies for maybe 12 minutes.  I've used KA all-purpose flour, bread flour, and a mix of the two. It all comes out great. The only time it failed is when I used Harvest King, which supersedes the gold medal best of bread (company recommends it for puff pastries and soft rolls on its site). Unlike KA, it produces a dense structure that I just do not care for with this pizza.

With KA flour, the deep dish crust has a golden hue color, and is almost transparent when you bite down into it, with a slightly crispy outer edge. There is no difference between it and Pizza Hut deep dish. Here's an example:

Bottom: http://home.comcast.net/~keck-foundation1/phut.JPG

 ::)

Holy smokes the bottom of your crust looks great.


Offline giotto

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #84 on: December 16, 2006, 11:10:13 PM »
Hey, thanks Sonicdrink.

Welcome aboard.

Here's a link to the same dough made into a thinner version. The formula and picture is provided, along with an embedded link that provides tips for pizza crust color. For deep dish, I preferred King Arthur flour. I put it in a 10" x 2" pan and heated according to the quote you included.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4284.msg36146.html#msg36146
« Last Edit: December 16, 2006, 11:16:19 PM by giotto »

Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #85 on: February 22, 2007, 11:29:25 PM »
Here is a version of "pizza hut origial pan pizza" that I came across. Don't ask how I got it or else I'd have to kill ya >:D  I don't know if this is anything close to what you pizza hutters are making or using, so I can't vouch for it's authenticity. I haven't tried it.

Pizza Hut Original Pan Pizza                       


                   1 1/3 cups  Warm water (105F)
                      1/4 cup  Non-fat dry milk
                     1/2 teas. Salt
                       4 cups  Flour
                      1 Tbls.  Sugar
                        1 pk.  Dry yeast
                      2 Tbls.  Vegetable oil (for dough)
                        9 Oz.  Vegetable oil (3 oz. per pan)
                               Butter flavored Pam

   Put yeast, sugar, salt, and dry milk in a large (2 qt.) bowl. Add
   water and stir to mix well. Allow to sit for two minutes. Add oil
   and stir again. Add flour and stir until dough forms and flour is
   absorbed. Turn out on to a flat surface and knead for about 10 minutes.

   Divide dough into three balls. In three 9" cake pans, put 3 Oz. of
   oil in each making sure it is spread evenly. Using a rolling pin,
   roll out each dough ball to about a 9" circle. Place in cake pans.
   Spray the outter edge of dough with Pam. Cover with a plate. Place
   in warm area and allow to rise for 1 to 1 1/2 hours.

            Sauce:
                1 8 Ounce Can Tomato Sauce
                1 Teaspoon Dry Oregano
              1/2 Teaspoon Marjoram
              1/2 Teaspoon Dry Basil
              1/2 Teaspoon Garlic salt

   Combine and let sit for 1 hour.

      For Each Nine Inch Pizza:

      1. Preheat oven to 475F
      2. Spoon 1/3 cup sauce on dough and spread to within 1" of edge.
      3. Distribute 1 1/2 Oz. shredded mozzarella cheese on sauce.
      4. Place toppings of your choice in this order:
         Pepperoni or Ham
         Vegetables
         Meats (cooked ground sausage or beef)
      5. Top with 3 Oz. mozzarella cheese
      6. Cook until cheese is bubbling and outer crust is brown.
      7. Cut in six slices.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #86 on: February 23, 2007, 07:21:12 AM »
Dan,

I thought what you posted looked familiar, and a Google search confirmed it: http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recs/525/Pizza_Hut_Original_Pan_Pizza41605.shtml.

Peter

Offline Randy

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #87 on: February 23, 2007, 07:42:45 AM »
And it looks like it is a slightly modified version of of the recipe XPH Mgr posted as post number one on this very same thread a few years ago and is included on the main page recipes of this site.  Looks like your find is actually a copy from this site.

It is always a good idea to try a recipe before posting so that you can give a good review
« Last Edit: February 23, 2007, 07:47:39 AM by Randy »

Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #88 on: February 23, 2007, 01:24:43 PM »
 >:( Dammit, I hate being busted by the forum police.  :-D  Thanks for keeping this place in check guys. I thought I stumbled upon the mother load OUTSIDE of this site, but I will check here next time first. Consider it a moment of spontaneous lack of judgement.

Offline November

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #89 on: February 23, 2007, 02:00:54 PM »
In an almost completely unrelated side-note, CDKitchen sometimes has some very looney recipes trying to imitate the real thing.  For instance:

http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recs/59/Mocha_Frappuccino60809.shtml

Offline Randy

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #90 on: February 23, 2007, 03:54:17 PM »
DNA Dan no harm no foul.  Keep posting

Offline Bryan S

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #91 on: February 24, 2007, 08:14:31 PM »
Making great pizza and learning new things everyday.


Offline elpresidente408

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #92 on: April 18, 2007, 02:05:16 PM »
Having worked at a Pizza Hut express for 2 years, I can say that the recipe from the last post is probably the most accurate. We would get the frozen dough cakes, squirt about 3oz of vegetable oil on the bottom of the pan, place the dough inside, spray the edges with food release (soybean oil), and let proof. After it rises about an inch or two, you stamp it down creating a depression in the center. Fill it up with the toppings and bake for 7 minutes in their convection ovens. This was for those personal 6" pies. We also got the dough pre-made.

I am still convinced that their dough was not made from anything natural lol. It would often smell like nail polish remover and would rise no matter where. Sometimes if we were short on proofed breadstick dough, we would proof it on top of the oven. Worked like a charm in 1/4 of the time it's supposed to take.
« Last Edit: April 18, 2007, 02:08:51 PM by elpresidente408 »

Offline Peterubers

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #93 on: June 17, 2007, 07:24:18 PM »
I made the recipe from the very first post of this thread -- only difference is that I split all the ingredients exactly down the middle to accomodate my 10" skillet, and I did not have dry milk so I excluded that.  I followed the directions exactly and only had time for 3 hours in the fridge.

The results were phenomenal -- tastes JUST LIKE PIZZA HUT.  I am a believer in this recipe.  I did 500 deg in a gas oven with pizza stone preheated for 45 minutes, then the seasoned skillet was placed directly on the stone for exactly 15 minutes. 

I put my italian sausage on uncooked and made the pieces very thin so it would cook within the span of 15 minutes, and it worked fine (the thickest piece was no more than 1/4 inch).

I used Harvest King unbleached white flour (Gold Medal), Fleichman's yeast, 6n1 doctored up with EVO and seasonings for my sauce and saputo's whole milk mozzo.


Offline Adam T

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #94 on: April 11, 2008, 08:08:41 AM »
I made up the dough using this recipe in the evening two days ago and baked it last night. This is the first time I attempted making a pan pizza.  I used King Arthur Bread Flour, 100 degree water, low fat dry milk, and 1 packet instant yeast for the recipe. I mixed/kneaded the dough in my Kitchenaid mixer with the dough hook on speed 2 for 10 minutes. In my short career of making pizzas at home I've never had a dough turn out this nice!

I used half the dough in a 9 x 13 no stick lasagna pan, I dressed the pizza right to the edge of the pan. I baked it for 12 minutes in my gas oven with the pan sitting on a baking stone that was pre-heated for 30min.

This made a fantastic pizza! Just what I wanted. I was hoping to start with this recipe and then try and recreate the pan style pizza sold at a local pizza place. (Jets Pizza http://jetspizza.net/) You can see a picture on their home page of what I was trying to achieve. I think the cheese right on the edge melts and forms a crispy browned rim around the top edge of the pizza. Anyway this recipe just nailed it the first try, 100 times better than I expected it would turn out.

I baked the other half of the dough in a slightly smaller rectangle bright silver pan my wife uses for making cakes. Between baking it second and the different pan it didn't turn out as nice. The pizza stuck to the sides of the pan, the bottom didn't brown up as nice and it absorbed more oil I think.

Offline Bread Maker

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #95 on: April 26, 2008, 08:07:57 PM »
Hey there. It's my first post.  :)

I think I am going to try this recipe, but replace the powdered milk with corn meal. I found another "copycat" recipe on another site, and it called for that.  I don't think I have the milk, so I might give it a try. Anyway, I love the forum. Glad I can be here.

Offline Bread Maker

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #96 on: April 26, 2008, 10:36:57 PM »
I did it with the corn meal and it was alright. It was just WAY TOO thick. It was like 2 inches thick. I'm still a novice, I guess. I guess it also doesn't help to not have a pizza stone. I went to Menards and another small hardware store and I can't find those quarry stones.

Offline Pete-zza

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« Last Edit: April 26, 2008, 10:57:50 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Bread Maker

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #98 on: April 26, 2008, 11:47:07 PM »
Bread Maker,



Peter

Thanks. I noticed from some of the responses that the bottom was also an issue for a couple. That, in fact, was an issue for me as well. I didn't use nearly enough oil (just enough to coat the bottom) and it was a bit tough getting it out. It was also sticking to the sides. All in all, the dough was actually somewhat tasty, a little. And....I skimped and cut corners, so it wasn't a total failure. Pretty much my first attempt at this style of pie.


By the way, it looks like you put in lots of effort to this forum. Thanks for that!

God Bless.
BM

Offline Jad

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #99 on: May 23, 2008, 07:44:48 PM »
Hi all!

I tried this recipe as my very first attempt at cooking my own pizza and it turned out great. Well it was extremely high (2-2.5") but it still tasted yummy as. We don't have deep pan that deep in down under, well not from Pizza Hut anyways. My 2nd attempt I simply made two pizzas from the exact same recipe like I noticed some others in this forum have done as well. It turned out perfect!

Anyway I was just curious, what kind of sugar are you all using? I've been using caster sugar but wondering is there a better I should be using. I'm a big fan of raw sugar in general but I'm not sure if that would work with this recipe. Any help is good help.

Also here in AUS the Pizza Hut deep pan has a crispness on the top of the pizza at the edges and side of the surface (the crust). The bottom of my pizzas are perfect but at the top of the crust and even the side of the pizza could be a little crisper. Would painting some more vegetable oil on these parts with a cooking brush just before placing the pizza in the oven do the trick? I can feel my arteries blocking up already but hey, if it tastes good right?  :chef: