Author Topic: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza  (Read 144956 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #150 on: December 18, 2009, 12:44:09 PM »
Tony,

You done good. However, if you plan to make only one dough ball for your 6" pan, you will have difficulty trying to make a 4.04 ounce dough ball in your stand mixer, and the instructions that you set forth, especially the knead times, are unlikely to apply as they would to a much larger dough batch size. Likewise, as to the bake time. I doubt that you will need 14 minutes to bake your 6" pizza.

The original instructions say to roll out the piece of dough to a size that is smaller than the pan size, whereas your instructions say to roll the dough piece out to the same size as your pan. I don't think that it will make much difference, but I will leave to you as to how to proceed. Moreover, since you are using the lower thickness factor value, I don't think you will have any leftover dough.

For the record, the dry non-fat milk is the Carnation's brand of dry non-fat milk as found in most supermarkets.

If you plan to make several dough balls, you might want to add 1.5% as a bowl residue compensation factor.

Good luck, and please let us know how things turn out.

Peter


Offline Trogdor33

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #151 on: December 20, 2009, 01:25:02 AM »
My family and I are going up to my parents house for the week and my mom wants me to make pizza one of the days we are up there. She is going to be amazed when she sees all the stuff I have to bring. I made 3 balls of my normal NY recipe, but since I will have two brand new lloyd pstk deep dish pans, I decided to make a couple PH pan dough balls to take up too. Since we won't get there until monday night, I cut down the yeast and am going to cold ferment until we get there and then roll out and proof at room temp until it is nice and puffy. I added the lactic acid because... well, I always add lactic acid now. Once you get used to that flavor, it's hard to go without.

      ounces   grams
KASL           100.00%   27.94   792.19
Water   55.56%   15.52   440.1
IDY           0.40%   0.11   3.17
Salt           0.88%   0.24   6.93
Oil           4.27%   1.19   33.83
NFDM           2.35%   0.66   18.63
Lactic Acid 0.70%   0.2   5.55

I pretty much followed xphmgr's instructions except that I had to hand knead after a few mins in the KA since the dough was so tough. Next time I may try adapting this recipe to a wet knead. I'll post pictures after I bake.
For all you non-geeks who may be wondering what the name trogdor is all about, have a look here: http://www.homestarrunner.com/sbemail58.html

Offline yelloguy

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #152 on: December 31, 2009, 12:17:33 PM »
Does this recipe require warm water?  I just finished making two crusts like it says.  Its been two hours but the crusts have not risen.  I am afraid if I put them in the fridge now, they will never rise.

When I make dough the usual ways, I use warm water and the dough balls double in size in an hour or so.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #153 on: December 31, 2009, 02:24:52 PM »
yelloguy,

The recipe, at http://www.pizzamaking.com/panpizza.php, is silent as to water temperature and the room temperature. 

Peter

Offline yelloguy

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #154 on: December 31, 2009, 03:18:29 PM »
Thanks Pete.  Searching some more, I think my problem is not the water temp (it probably should be cold).  After 4 cups of flour, the dough looked nicely done.  But following the recipe, I added half cup more thinking it probably needs harder dough.  That was probably my fatal mistake since after running the dough maker for 10 minutes, I had to give it about 3 minutes more to make it smoother.  The dough came out so hard that I had to use a rolling pin to stretch/roll it and even then it took a lot of force.

I think its going to be a disaster in the evening.  But that should teach me not to try out new recipes in front of other people.

Offline JConk007

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #155 on: January 14, 2010, 09:37:33 PM »
Can Pan!
Got it! Last time I had too much dough in the pan and it rose to about 2" this time I halved it, and it was perfect. I forgot to weigh before placing in pan  :'(. I was going by feel and what I started with last time.
Anyway came out just like the PH Pan I purchased many a time, thickness, and crumb (tight air voids) were right on! Bottom golden brown soft with a almost fried bottom. I let the dough rise in the pan for a good hr. with EVOO on top then I laid down a nice layer of provolone. I know its not in the P Hut recipe, but I wanted to kick it up a notch, and it was a great taste! provy, sauce mozz,pepperoni, and more Grande. I cooked it about 15 min @400 center rack. Did this when I was done with the cracker. Because I wanted to go to both ends of the spectrum. I enjoyed this pizza very much!
« Last Edit: January 14, 2010, 09:54:11 PM by JConk007 »
I Love to Flirt with Fire! www.flirtingwithfirepizza.com

Offline epicalien

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #156 on: January 21, 2010, 02:00:14 AM »
Pizza Hut Pan Pizza ( Makes one 14” Pan Pizza )
King Arthur Bread Flour      13.24oz
Great Value Bottled Water          7.36oz
Fleishmann’s Active Dry Yeast     0.16oz
Morton’s Kosher Salt           0.12oz
Vegetable Oil              0.57oz
Sugar                 0.25oz
Dry Non-Fat Milk           0.31oz
***This is a hybrid between my own personal tastes and xPHmgr’s Pizza Hut Recipe from the front page of this website.  I used quite a bit from xPHmgr’s recipe so I am not claiming this to be my original recipe.  I just had some excellent results with this hybrid and would love to give back to the community that has helped me so much.  I would still be making canned biscuit pizzas if it weren’t for you guys and gals. Ha ha***
Mix water and dry non-fat milk together.
Heat 1 minute on high heat in microwave (approx. 130-140 degrees) to disable the whey protein. (I read this somewhere.)  Then let cool to 105 degrees so you don’t kill the yeast.
Add yeast & mix thoroughly until fully dissolved.  Let stand for approx. 10 minutes.
Using the Paddle Attachment on “STIR” speed:
Pour the yeast/water mixture into the stand mixer bowl.
Add the flour, salt, & sugar to the stand mixer bowl and continue to mix.(about 2 min.)
Mix until the flour has absorbed & then add the vegetable oil & continue to mix.
(approx. 1 to 2 minutes)
Switch to the Spiral Dough Hook and knead on speed “2” for approx. 15 minutes.
Add a ½ cup (4oz) of vegetable oil to a 14” deep dish pizza pan.
Roll out the dough until it is 12” in diameter and put it into the 14” pan.
Cover the pan tightly with plastic wrap and allow to rise and fill the 14” pan.
I sprayed the underside of the plastic wrap with Pam’s cooking spray so the dough wouldn’t stick to it.
Place the pan into the fridge for 24 hours.
When ready to cook:
Take the pan out of the fridge and spray the crust ring with Pam Cooking Spray.
Press down the center part (everything but the crust ring) with your hands or an appropriate sized plastic lid.
Preheat the oven to 450 °F for 40 minutes with the pizza stone on bottom rack.
Add sauce, cheese, and toppings. (We used pepperoni, whole milk mozzarella, bacon, green peppers, and onions).
Bake at 450°F in the pan directly on the pizza stone for approximately 25 minutes or until crust is golden brown.
Pizza Hut Sauce I use (I think it tastes just like Pizza Hut’s sauce)
½ teaspoon Italian Seasoning
½ teaspoon Oregano
½ teaspoon Garlic Powder
½ teaspoon Sugar
1 (8 oz) can tomato sauce
1 (8 oz) can tomato paste

Offline epicalien

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #157 on: January 21, 2010, 04:31:42 AM »
Here's the pan I used.  It is a 14" Chicago Metallic Round bought from Amazon.com.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2010, 08:59:53 PM by epicalien »

Offline Biaviian

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #158 on: February 22, 2010, 10:03:11 AM »
I did this (followed the recipe in the OP) and used 450of.  I also used olive oil in the dough because I didn't have any vegetable oil.  Then I realized that I didn't want to use olive oil in the pan so I borrowed some canola oil.  I found that there is way too much oil.  The crust just tasted like fried dough.  I also found that I didn't use enough sauce.  I just used a jarred sauce (Del Grosso NY Style Pizza Sauce).  I also used a low fat shredded mozzarella cheese.  I also let the dough sit in the fridge for 22.5 hours.  Before saucing the dough I pressed down the center of the dough (all but the crust ring). 

I then baked it for 20 minutes (the oven preheated for about 40 minutes and I baked it on the lowest rack on a stone) and allowed it to sit in the oven (oven off and door open about 10") for 5 minutes prior to cutting.  I used the same pan as the above poster.  I did find a few things. 

  • Too much oil in the pan.  Next time I will cut it down in half.
  • The crust ring did not brown.  The underside was a perfect color.  Next time I will brush a bit of butter or oil in the crust ring.
  • I did not put enough sauce on the pizza.  I used about 10.5 ounces
  • The crust was too thick.  The outer crust was the perfect size but the rest of the crust (I'll call it inner crust) was too thick.  I'd like it about 3/4 the thickness.

I'm not sure what to do about the last item but the rest I can take care of.  It did taste a lot like Pizza Hut.  I felt there was a little something missing but I feel the lack of sauce was the issue.  I'm sorry I didn't take any pictures but I didn't think of it until it was too late.


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #159 on: February 22, 2010, 10:21:55 AM »
Biavilian,

You might take a look at Reply 6 in this thread, at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909.

Peter

Offline Biaviian

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #160 on: February 22, 2010, 01:57:00 PM »
Thanks.  I read the entire thread last week but I forgot about (or skimmed over) that post.  It still doesn't help me with getting the inner crust thinner while keeping the thickness of the outer crust though.  Maybe I should weight down the inner crust while it is in the fridge.  I'm not really sure.

Offline Puzzolento

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #161 on: February 22, 2010, 02:41:10 PM »
I don't see anyone mentioning the weirdest thing about Pizza Hut pan pizza. Years ago, I went to pick one up at a small store in Austin, and after the kid threw it in the box, he asked if I wanted butter on the crust. He was holding a spray can full of garlic butter! Until then, I had always assumed the tasty grease on the crust was something that oozed out of the dough. It amazed me that there was such a thing as spray-on butter.

I told him I would pass.

scott123

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #162 on: February 22, 2010, 03:03:42 PM »
Talking about greasy Pizza Hut pizza....

I grew up, where I am now, in NJ eating, imo, at some of best pizza places on the planet. I loved the stuff.  I went to college out in Illinois, and it was there where I had Pizza Hut for the first time.

CAUTION- if you are easily grossed out or a huge fan of Pizza Hut and want to remain that way, DO NOT READ on!!!

Anyway...  ;D It was a school thing, and they bought us as much pizza as we could eat. I've always been able to eat a lot, and back then was no exception. I gorged myself silly. It's kind of hard to remember exactly, but it could have been somewhere around the 3 pie mark.

When I came back to the dorm... I wasn't feeling too hot  :)  This pizza had no intention whatsoever of staying down.  So, off to the bathroom I went where I proceeded to heave the entire meal into one single toilet bowl.  My body rejected it entirely. Now, I'm not one to really analyze what comes out of me (in any form), but this was really kind of hard to miss.  Sitting in the bowl was about 3 inches of reddish/bready muck and, floating on top of that, was 4 solid inches of crystal clear oil. 4 inches of oil!!!

I kid you not  ;D
« Last Edit: February 22, 2010, 03:41:03 PM by scott123 »

Offline Randy

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #163 on: February 23, 2010, 05:50:41 PM »
Fried pizza is just about the right description but that is the way it is suppose to be. 

The canola would have been my last choice since it can give an off flavor to the crust.

I currently use this recipe to make a Chicago deep dish style pizza and really enjoy this crossover recipe but I use just enough oil to make a good coating in the pan which is much less oil.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8410.0.html

Randy

Offline Biaviian

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #164 on: February 23, 2010, 08:00:54 PM »
It was either Canoloa or Olive Oil and I thought that Olive Oil would affect the flavor more.  Maybe I was wrong; I don't know.  I like the recipe you linked to and I think I'll give it a shot.  I asked in that thread but I'll ask here too.  How do you take the whole pizza out of the pan like that?

Offline Puzzolento

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #165 on: February 23, 2010, 08:59:09 PM »
Canola oil should be outlawed, except for frying fish.

Offline Randy

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #166 on: February 23, 2010, 09:22:44 PM »
Yes I use a spring form pan, a cheap nonstick one at that so all you have to do is take the side off and slide it off the bottom.

I have use a 10" straight sided cake pan but it can be a challenge to get it out but it can be done.

If you like this pan recipe, you will really like the Chicago version.

Randy


Offline gtsum2

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #167 on: April 24, 2010, 11:45:28 PM »
pan pizza is next on my list to try...I assume one can use a CI pan, or where is a good place to get a "pan pizza" pizza pan? 

This seems like a great and very informative site!

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #168 on: April 25, 2010, 12:36:36 AM »
Glad to see you made it over here Gtsum.  This is (for now) my other playground.   I have only been here a couple of months and my pizza and pizza knowledge has improved a lot thanks to the many helpful forum members. 

Coincidentally enough I found this place looking for a PH pan pizza recipe.  The one posted on this site by PHXmngr is a great recipe.  I also posted a PH sauce recipe that's very close.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4452.0.html

Again, welcome and you'll have lots of fun with your pizza adventure.   BTW, I'm working on a new Primo set up.  If all goes well I'll post the results on the other forum.

Not sure about the pan, but i have read of members using thick cake pans that seem to work well.  I see nothing wrong with a CI pan but maybe someone with actual experience can chime in.  I have a Pampered chef deep dish pizza stone that works really well. 

Tran
« Last Edit: April 25, 2010, 12:42:03 AM by Tranman »

Offline gtsum2

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #169 on: April 25, 2010, 07:26:42 AM »


thanks for the info...I may be bouncing some questions of you if you don't mind?!  Thanks again for telling me about this place...you were right...lots of good info here!

Offline Modegolf

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Pizza Hut Pan Pizza - Proofing Question
« Reply #170 on: April 25, 2010, 08:22:35 AM »
Please help!  I am into making PH pan pizzas now and need advice on proofing.

I understand you can proof the dough either BEFORE putting it into the fridge for 4-24 hours, or AFTER the dough has been refrigerated (just before dressing and baking).

Here are my questions:

1.  Is there any difference to the flavor and/or texture of the dough whether it is proofed before or after cold fermentation?

2.  Why proof at all?  For example, with the PJ Clone or a NY Style, there is only one rise then forming and baking.  Is there a simple rule that tells me when I should proof a dough (which is actually a second rise) and when one rise is sufficient?

Thank you for your help!

Offline Randy

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #171 on: April 25, 2010, 08:57:51 AM »
I think is best answer is, to some degree it will effect the flavor and the texture.  It is up to the individual decided how much.
If this is your first try I would stay with the recipe.

The individual rises(proof as you call them) also controls the texture.

Best to follow the recipe to get what the original author had in mind.

Randy

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #172 on: April 25, 2010, 10:48:37 AM »
Modegolf,

Sometimes the matter of whether the dough should be allowed to "proof", or rise, before or after cold fermentation is a philosophical one. For example, Tom Lehmann, of the American Institute of Baking and an acknowledged expert on pizza doughs, prefers to cold ferment pretty much all pizza doughs and shape them later, after the cold fermentation. An example of a dough recipe that Tom has recommended for pan pizzas and where the shaping is done after cold fermentation is at the PMQ Think Tank at http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?p=37687#37687.

Usually, when one wants to achieve above average volume in a pizza crust, the dough is allowed to "proof", or rise, before baking. This is common for Sicilian, pan style and Greek/pan pizzas, and focaccia as well. It can actually be used for almost any style, including NY and a Papa John's American style pizza, although most people do not use a proof approach for those styles. Those doughs are tempered for a brief period but, unliike the other styles mentioned above, they are not proofed in order to get added height in the finished crust.

Whether a dough is to be subjected to a single or multiple fermentations is usually dictated by the dough recipe used. For example, Neapolitan style doughs often go through a bulk rise and individual rises after division. Emergency doughs intended to be made and used within a few hours also often go through two fermentation periods. I have seen a few dough recipes where dough balls are punched down one or more times during fermentation, both at room temperature and in the refrigerator, but those are not the most common methods. Absent a recipe and instructions to guide you as to when to use multiple fermentation periods, it will usually be as a result of a lot of experience and experimentation with doughs to tell you when you should use a single or multiple fermentations. There are no simple rules and often the course to take is not particularly intuitive.

You can read some other thoughts that I have had on this general subject at Reply 7 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3798.msg31749.html#msg31749. You might also read the other posts in that thread.

I agree with Randy that one should follow the instructions given for a particular dough recipe. All too often, people freelance and when they get poor results they end up blaming the recipe rather than their deviations.

Peter

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
« Reply #173 on: April 25, 2010, 11:48:54 AM »
Yes, I will third that as well (can I say that?  :P)  Stick with the recipe.

In my very limited pizza making experience, I have use both for different purposes.  The first proof or rise is commonly referred to as a "bulk rise" or even rest period.  From what I have read and have used it for, this period is commonly used when very little yeast is used in the formula with a goal of cold fermenting in the fridge for several days.  This kicks starts the yeast so that it will slowly work it's magic on the dough while in deep sleep.    The dough will usually slowly rise while in the fridge.  It is still working, but it's activity has been slowed down.  Without this bulk rise or rest period to kick start the yeast, the dough may not rise as much in the fridge.    The purpose of letting the dough cold ferment for long periods of time (vs baking it right away)  is to allow the yeast to make it's waste product and make the dough more flavorful.  It also changes the texture a bit. 
  The 2nd use of a bulk rise is commonly done when a sourdough starter (preferment) is used.  It is usually allowed to bulk rise or ferment at room temps for 4-20 hours or so prior to baking.  Depending on how much starter you use, you can leave it to bulk rise for shorter or longer periods. 

The room temp proof is used to allow the dough to come up to room temps after being in the fridge at a temp of 40F.  During this time, the yeast's activity is sped up and more gas (air bubbles) is produce leavening the dough further.  It serves 2 purpose (in my mind).  1) it allows the dough to become more pliable and workable. Easier to stretch and make a skin.  Some ppl stretch the dough within 1 hour of room temp proofing (or even just warming) while others will allow the dough to sit at room temps upwards of 9 hours without any problems.  Secondly, the room proofing allows the yeast to work further making the dough lighter and airier. You don't want the dough to double in size during this stage as you run the risk of getting a deflated pie.  The yeast can exhaust all of it's food source(s) and stop working, thus giving you little to no rise in the oven (oven spring).  You'll want the dough to proof to about 50-75% of it's original volume, but not doubled (100%).

How long you bulk rise, cold ferment, or room proof is really dependent on the amount of yeast (vs the amount of dough).  Less yeast and you can go longer with all of these times.  More yeast and you have to shorten the times.  That's why it's best to follow the recipe until you develop a feel for using a particular brand of yeast or a certain starter. 

This is my understanding of the subject, but please correct me if I'm wrong.  Hope that helps. 
« Last Edit: April 25, 2010, 11:58:19 AM by Tranman »

Offline Modegolf

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Thank You and Next Challenge
« Reply #174 on: April 25, 2010, 01:47:18 PM »
Thank you all for responding to my post on proofing.  I appreciate the speed and thoroughness of your answers.  You have helped boost my knowledge of home pizza making to the next level!

I now feel very confident about my ability to make a PJ Clone and a PH Pan Clone.  I have made LOTS of them and you have provided the last pieces of the puzzle for me.

In light of this newfound confidence, I have decided to tackle the Detroit Style (Buddy’s) pizza.  I am very nervous about the hydration level, but I will be sure to post to that thread with results and questions!

Thanks again for all your help.  :)