Author Topic: Yeast amounts  (Read 621 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline sb 44 champs

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 95
  • Location: S. Louisiana
Yeast amounts
« on: October 08, 2012, 04:47:31 PM »
How do you know what the correct yeast amount would be for a particuliar recipe if you plan on cold fermenting the dough for 1-3 days?

For instance, a NY style dough (i think it is a Reinhart recipe) shows 1.5 tsp of yeast and the dough should be refrigerated for a min of 12 hrs. Here's the recipe.

5 cups (22.5 ounces) unbleached high gluten flour or unbleached bread flour
1  1/2 tablespoons (1 oz.) honey or 2 tablespoons (1 oz.) sugar
2 teaspoons (0.5 oz.) salt (any kind)
1 1/2 teaspoons (0.18 oz.) instant yeast or 2 teaspoons active dry yeast
3 tablespoons (1.5 oz.) olive or vegetable oil
1 3/4 cups (14 oz.) water, lukewarm



There are several recipes, including the pizza dough calculator, that do not factor in cold fermentation vs room temp rise doughs. I've read where too much yeast causes over-fermentation. If I am planning on a 24-48 hr cold ferment period, should I just reduce the amount of yeast the recipe calls for if it does not specifically provide how long the cold fermentation period is for that particuliar recipe? And should I increase the amount of salt used?

Finally, if I sub beer in place of water, should I reduce the amount of yeast the recipe calls for?

Thanks Eddie


Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21686
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Yeast amounts
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2012, 06:21:55 PM »
Eddie,

The recipe you recited is a Reinhart NY style dough recipe that is set forth at http://www.fornobravo.com/pizzaquest/instructionals/59-written-recipes/169-ny-style-pizza-dough.html.

My advice to newbies is to try a given recipe as instructed and to make adjustments later if things do not materialize as intended. I would not try using a beer version until you see how the basic recipe performs as stated.

You will want to keep good notes on what you do in case the recipe later needs adjustment to conform it to your particular home setting.

Peter


 

pizzapan