Author Topic: Milk Powder VS Milk  (Read 404 times)

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Offline Wormtail

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Milk Powder VS Milk
« on: September 03, 2015, 07:46:32 PM »
What's the difference between using milk powder and water vs. milk in pizza dough? Just asking because milk powder is pretty expensive.

Mike


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Milk Powder VS Milk
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2015, 07:51:17 PM »
Mostly the difference is water.
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Milk Powder VS Milk
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2015, 08:03:25 PM »
Mike,

You can substitute liquid milk for dry milk powder in a dough formulation so long as you have the correct amount of milk solids. And then you have to reduce the formula hydration by the amount of water that is in the milk. You can see how these kinds of calculations are performed in Reply 16 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=38879.msg389448;topicseen#msg389448 .

Peter

Offline Gianni5

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Re: Milk Powder VS Milk
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2015, 08:13:52 PM »
Is there much of a difference as far as results between the two?  I think I read it somewhere here on the forum that there are enzymes in milk that can have a negative effect on the yeast.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Milk Powder VS Milk
« Reply #4 on: September 03, 2015, 08:42:51 PM »
Is there much of a difference as far as results between the two?  I think I read it somewhere here on the forum that there are enzymes in milk that can have a negative effect on the yeast.
Gianni5,

There is a whey protein in fresh milk that can attack the gluten and soften the dough, and the dough may not rise properly. Scalding the milk disables the whey protein. The milk should be allowed to cool before using.

Peter