Author Topic: New York style pizza  (Read 9073 times)

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Michael

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New York style pizza
« on: January 28, 2003, 01:20:02 PM »
I'm a New Yorker living in London and have been craving an authentic NY Pizza. I recently bought a counter-top pizza oven made in Italy by G3Ferrari. It is supposed to get to 800 degrees.

This weekend, I made my first few pizzas and though they were very good, I wasn't able to get the thin crusts of a real NY Pizza. I've since read that by proofing by dough in the fridge rather than in a warm place, I may get a thinner crust.

Any ideas?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by 1050044400 »


Offline Steve

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Re: New York style pizza
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2003, 01:55:18 PM »
Are you rolling out your dough or are you stretching it out? Are you not able to get it thin because the dough is tearing?

When I make NY pizza, I flatten the ball of dough into a flat disc, then I gently start stretching it with my clenched fists. Eventually it will stretch out big with a very, very thin middle (the dough is stretched so thin that you can almost see through it) with the outer edges being rather thick.

The cooked result is a pizza with a very thin middle and a thick, puffy, bread-like outer edge. Very much like the authentic NY pizza that I remember.

Be sure to use high-gluten flour (or bread flour). Cook the pizza on a pizza stone or oven tiles... don't use a pan.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by 1050044400 »
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Michael

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Re: New York style pizza
« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2003, 02:12:22 PM »
I am stretching it out and it is getting thin (virtually translucent). But when its cooking, it tends to expand a bit. I'm using 12% protein flour.

Have you heard of people that let their dough rise in the refrigerator for a couple of days rather than leave it in a warm place?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by 1050044400 »

Offline Steve

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Re: New York style pizza
« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2003, 03:49:45 PM »
This recipe is from Tom Lehman (the Dough Doctor) from the American Institute of Baking (AIB). The recipe is scaled for restaurant use, but I'm sure you wouldn't have any problems scaling it for home use.




New York Pizza
By Tom Lehman

This formula produces a somewhat thin crust with a tough, chewy texture.

Ingredients
  • Flour: (a typical pizza flour with 13.5 to 14% or more protein): 100.00%
  • Salt 1.75%
  • Olive Oil: 1.00%
  • Compressed Yeast: 0.5 to 0.75%
  • Water (with the temperature adjusted to give a finished dough at 80 to 85F): 58 to 65%

How to Prepare:

Standard Dough Making Procedure: Put water into the mixing bowl, add the salt and sugar, then add the flour and the yeast. Mix at low speed for about 2 minutes, then mix at medium speed until all of the flour has been picked up into the dough. Now add the oil and mix in for 2 minutes at low speed, then mix the dough at medium speed until it develops a smooth, satiny appearance (generally about 8 to 10 minutes using a planetary mixer).

The dough temperature should be between 80 and 85F. Immediately divide the dough into desired weight pieces and round into balls. Wipe the dough balls with salad oil, and place into plastic dough boxes. Make sure that the dough balls are spaced about 2 inches apart. Cross stack the uncovered dough boxes in the cooler for 2 hours as this will allow the dough balls to cool down thoroughly, and uniformly. The dough boxes can then be nested, with the top box being covered. This will prevent excessive drying of the dough balls.

The dough balls will be ready to use after about 12 hours of refrigeration. They can be used after up to 72 hours of refrigeration with good results. To use the dough balls, remove a quantity from the cooler and allow them to warm at room temperature for approximately 2-3 hours. The dough can then be shaped into skins, or shaped into pans for proofing. Unused dough can remain at room temperature (covered to prevent drying) for up to 6 hours after removal from the cooler.

Note: If using ACTIVE DRY YEAST (ADY) only half the amo0unt as compressed yeast. Then suspend the ADY in a small quantity of warm water (105 110F) and allow it to stand for 10 to 15 minutes. Add this to the water in the mixing bowl, but do not add the salt and sugar to the water, instead, add the salt and sugar to the flour, then begin mixing as directed.

If using INSTANT DRY YEAST (IDY) us only 1/3 the amount as compressed yeast. Add the IDY to the flour along with the salt and sugar, and begin mixing as directed.

« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by 1050044400 »
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Offline buzz

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Re: New York style pizza
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2003, 10:19:36 AM »
Here are Evelyn Slomon's ("The Pizza Book") tips on making authentic New York style pizza. Use a pre-heated pizza stone or tiles, and put the pizza directly on the stone (or use a pizza screen).

1 cup warm water
1 level tsp. yeast
3-3 and a half cups bread or all-purpose flour (a higher-gluten flour such as Ceresota or King Arthur)
one-half tsp. salt

Let the dough double in bulk (45-60 minutes), punch it down and knead for 2-3 minutes. Then return it to the bowl and refrigerate for 15 minutes before shaping.
Bake at 500 degrees.

You might want to try substituting a cup of pastry (cake) flour for one of the cups of flour--this will mimic the traditional "00" flour used in Italian pizzerias.

Have fun!
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by 1050044400 »

Offline Steve

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Re: New York style pizza
« Reply #5 on: February 22, 2003, 08:01:13 AM »
Been tweaking my NY style dough recipe... it's almost perfect now, IMHO! 8)

1 pound high-gluten flour
9 fl. oz. warm water
2 tsp. active dry yeast
2 tsp. sugar
1 tsp. salt
1 Tbsp. light olive oil

Put dry ingredients in bowl of food processor and run until flour, yeast, sugar, and salt have thoroughly mixed. Through feed tube, pour in the warm water and olive oil. Once everything comes together, let machine knead the dough for 30 seconds.

When done, the dough will be warm and slightly sticky to the touch. Remove dough from bowl and let sit for a minute or two. The dough should become less sticky and more smooth and elastic after a minute or two. You should be able to handle it with your dry hands without the dough sticking. Shape into a ball and coat with olive oil.

Let rise in a warm place until double in bulk, about 1 to 1.5 hours. Punch down, knead, and let rise a second time for about 30 minutes.

Place dough on a lightly floured work area and gently press into an 8-inch disc. Pick up the disc and place it on top of your clenched fists. Move your fists outwards, stretching the dough. Each time you stretch outwards, rotate the dough and stretch again until the dough is very thin, almost translucent, in the center and relatively thick and puffy on the outer edge. Place on a pizza peel dusted with cornmeal, add sauce, cheese, and toppings. Bake at 500-degrees F. on a pizza stone until golden brown.

Enjoy!!!

Note: Use light or classic olive oil for making pizza... do not use extra virgin olive oil which has a very pronounced flavor--it will overpower the flavor of the pizza.

« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:02 PM by -1 »
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Offline DKM

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Re: New York style pizza
« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2003, 07:47:13 PM »
Quote
Have you heard of people that let their dough rise in the refrigerator for a couple of days rather than leave it in a warm place?


I let all my pizza dough age in the frig.  I take it out about an hour to  two hours before making the pizza.

IMO it gives the pizza a better flavor.

DKM
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 07:00:00 PM by 1050044400 »
I'm on too many of these boards

Offline Steve

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Re: New York style pizza
« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2004, 11:04:18 AM »
Been tweaking my NY style dough recipe... it's almost perfect now, IMHO! 8)

1 pound high-gluten flour
9 fl. oz. warm water
2 tsp. active dry yeast
2 tsp. sugar
1 tsp. salt
1 Tbsp. light olive oil

Put dry ingredients in bowl of food processor and run until flour, yeast, sugar, and salt have thoroughly mixed. Through feed tube, pour in the warm water and olive oil. Once everything comes together, let machine knead the dough for 30 seconds.

When done, the dough will be warm and slightly sticky to the touch. Remove dough from bowl and let sit for a minute or two. The dough should become less sticky and more smooth and elastic after a minute or two. You should be able to handle it with your dry hands without the dough sticking. Shape into a ball and coat with olive oil.

Let rise in a warm place until double in bulk, about 1 to 1.5 hours. Punch down, knead, and let rise a second time for about 30 minutes.

Place dough on a lightly floured work area and gently press into an 8-inch disc. Pick up the disc and place it on top of your clenched fists. Move your fists outwards, stretching the dough. Each time you stretch outwards, rotate the dough and stretch again until the dough is very thin, almost translucent, in the center and relatively thick and puffy on the outer edge. Place on a pizza peel dusted with cornmeal, add sauce, cheese, and toppings. Bake at 500-degrees F. on a pizza stone until golden brown.

Enjoy!!!

Note: Use light or classic olive oil for making pizza... do not use extra virgin olive oil which has a very pronounced flavor--it will overpower the flavor of the pizza.



Took my NY style recipe (above) and divided the dough in half. I was able to stretch each dough ball into a 16" pizza crust!! That high-gluten flour is really amazing stuff. The crust turned out exactly like I was hoping for... it was paper thin all the way out to the outer edge, where it became puffy. Everyone thought the pizza was great. I was truly amazed. And to think I was using the whole dough recipe for a single pizza in the past!   ;D
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Offline Randy

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Re:New York style pizza
« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2004, 02:42:10 PM »
Try increasing the water and it will get even better.

Randy

Offline Steve

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Re:New York style pizza
« Reply #9 on: February 09, 2004, 03:19:31 PM »
Better how?  ???

This dough showed no signs of tearing and I had it so thin you could almost read a newspaper through it.  :)
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Offline Randy

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Re:New York style pizza
« Reply #10 on: February 09, 2004, 05:23:57 PM »
Crisper crust, improved flavor with reduced kneading, and the wet dough will pick up more of the shaping mixture.

Randy

Offline canadave

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Re:New York style pizza
« Reply #11 on: February 09, 2004, 05:48:18 PM »
Also, Steve...have you tried an overnight rise rather than the immediate rise?  That made a *huge* difference in the flavour.

Dave

Offline Steve

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Re:New York style pizza
« Reply #12 on: February 09, 2004, 06:48:30 PM »
Yeah, I usually do the overnight rise... but I didn't have time during the last batch, so it only got a 5 hour rise. Still, the kids loved it.

I'll try a moister dough next time and see how that works out.  :)
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Offline Pierre

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Re:New York style pizza
« Reply #13 on: February 10, 2004, 05:14:09 PM »
Steve, raise the amount of water to 9.5 fl.oz for 60% water content or  10 fl oz. for 65%.

like Randy wrote, the water gives it more CRISP. French Bakers use a similar method (their ovens are equipped with a humidifier) to get their Baguettes so crisp.

your recipe above results in approximatly 30 oz. (850 grams) of finished, raised dough and is enough dough for 2 pies. My Stone is only a bit larger than 12 inches in diameter (My oven is sadly not wider than 14 inches wide) so I always assumed you were using half the dough for each pie.

Pierre


 

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