Author Topic: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!  (Read 253814 times)

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Offline norma427

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Re: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!
« Reply #1325 on: January 27, 2013, 07:16:18 PM »
The Buddyís clone dough final temperature was 65.3 degrees F when it was mixed.  I did use cooler water because I wasnít sure what to do.  I used a little less yeast than the formulation called for, but since I was at market and only had a limited amount of time that I was allowed to be there today, I didnít have the time to use the expanded dough calculation tool on my cell phone to reduce the yeast to where it might have needed to be.  I did mix the dough differently this time and let it rest 15 minutes in the mixer bowl and then mixed again for awhile, but didnít mix as aggressively as last week when no salt was added.  The dough didnít feel sticky and didnít stick to my fingers at all.  The  dough also balled well after being scaled.  Hopefully the Buddyís clone dough balls will work out okay on Tuesday.  I didnít have time to grate my cheeses today or do other things that needed done.  If the weather turns out better than expected tomorrow, then I will go to market and check on the dough balls and also do the other things I need to do.  I did place the poppy seeds on the one dough ball to see how much the dough ball ferments until Tuesday.

Norma 


Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!
« Reply #1326 on: January 27, 2013, 07:27:36 PM »
Norma,

As you know, it is hard to hurt a dough with a fair amount of yeast, and using a pan makes it fairly easy to handle a high hydration dough, even one that is highly fermented. Also, in your case, you have both your refrigeration equipment and your Hatco unit to help control the dough temperature. What remains to be seen is whether the dough is ready to make pizzas by mid-morning on Tuesday.

It's hard to believe that you have been at market for almost four years.

Peter

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Re: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!
« Reply #1327 on: January 27, 2013, 07:52:32 PM »
Gene,

This is the way it has been at market since I started almost four years ago in not exactly knowing what to do.  I have become accustomed to it somewhat, but still there are problems and that is why I ask so many questions for different experiments or when I am trying to make a new style of pizza that I might want to offer at market..  

I would have tried you recipe if I hadnít started this thread and went though all these experiments to get to where I am now.  These experiments have taken us about 3 months now to have a decent workable dough and pizza for my conditions I have to work in.  As we know from the Buddyís thread and this thread Buddyís doesnít use any sugar or oil in their doughs, so that bloggers recipe isnít really authentic.  I did go by volume measurements from my friend Trenton Bill, but donít like to usually test out recipes for pizzas that way.  Trenton Bill just told me he had made a really good Sicilian pizza, but at first didnít tell me it was from the Buddyís thread.  That is why I tried his recipe in volume measurements.  There are just too many problems with errors in not using bakerís percents.  If you are happy with that recipe then you can use it and if anyone other member wants to try they can.  I figure since I have been though all of these experiments and Peter has helped me to get to where I am now, why mess with something that doesnít need fixed in my opinion, unless I find more problems along the way.

I sure donít know (and hope you donĎt), but think you might also run into some problems when trying to take a recipe and trying to repeat it in volume instead of making one or a few Detroit style pizzas if you decide to offer Detroit style pizza to real customers.  It is a lot different for me in trying to make a few dough balls and then trying to make many that will last through out a 12 hr. day.  Since this is a higher hydration dough that also can cause some problems.  I am not sure about the food laws in NYC, but in our area they are fairly strict at what can be done and what cannot be done.  Food inspectors do inspect my little pizza stand and I had to go though a food course and pass a test.  

Norma

Norma,

I understand.  I was just thinking that by keeping your recipe as is, except for increasing the amount of yeast, that everything would stay the same except that the dough, handled exactly as you handle it now, would rise faster and be ready to use sooner.  And once the dough has risen, you would use it the same way as you do now.  In other words, with more yeast, everything would happen the same way it does now, just sooner/faster.  But maybe I'm wrong?

Regarding the 12-hour day, with a one-hour rise, I would not have to keep dough for 12 hours - maybe two hours.  That's what my customers that offer New York pizza do:  At the same time pizzas are being baked and sold upstairs, guys downstairs are mixing and shaping fresh dough.  That way, they can handle varying order flow.  They don't have to keep enough dough for the "walk-in crowd" and estimate an additional amount in case they get a sudden delivery order of, say, 20 pizzas; they can fill the order and then tell one of the crew to mix some extra dough.  Basically, they start and end each day with zero mixed dough.

On your next trip, you might visit one of the 2 Brother's Pizza locations - not for the pizza, which is mediocre, but to see the operation.  They charge 99 cents for a plain slice and the pies just fly out the door.  The guy stretching the dough balls (a second guy adds sauce and cheese) creates an 18-inch "disk," literally, every 30 seconds, non-stop, all day.  No way they could make that much dough much more than an hour ahead of time.

Needless to say, I would love to have that problem in my own place!

Gene
« Last Edit: January 27, 2013, 08:03:10 PM by gschwim »

Offline norma427

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Re: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!
« Reply #1328 on: January 27, 2013, 08:08:32 PM »
Norma,

As you know, it is hard to hurt a dough with a fair amount of yeast, and using a pan makes it fairly easy to handle a high hydration dough, even one that is highly fermented. Also, in your case, you have both your refrigeration equipment and your Hatco unit to help control the dough temperature. What remains to be seen is whether the dough is ready to make pizzas by mid-morning on Tuesday.

It's hard to believe that you have been at market for almost four years.

Peter

Peter,

I did learn it is hard to hurt a dough with a fair amount of yeast and the pans also makes it easier to handle a high hydrations doughs.  I guess we will see if the dough is ready to make pizzas by mid-morning on Tuesday.  It is always a guessing game.  I used less IDY in that formulation than it called for and the only reason I didnít drop it more was I wasnít sure exactly what to do since I was trying for a lower final dough temperature.

I know the almost 4 years flew by fast for me.  I still remember those first few months though and everything I did wrong.   :-D

Norma

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Re: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!
« Reply #1329 on: January 27, 2013, 08:23:23 PM »
Norma,

I understand.  I was just thinking that by keeping your recipe as is, except for increasing the amount of yeast, that everything would stay the same except that the dough, handled exactly as you handle it now, would rise faster and be ready to use sooner.  And once the dough has risen, you would use it the same way as you do now.  In other words, with more yeast, everything would happen the same way it does now, just sooner/faster.  But maybe I'm wrong?

Regarding the 12-hour day, with a one-hour rise, I would not have to keep dough for 12 hours - maybe two hours.  That's what my customers that offer New York pizza do:  At the same time pizzas are being baked and sold upstairs, guys downstairs are mixing and shaping fresh dough.  That way, they can handle varying order flow.  They don't have to keep enough dough for the "walk-in crowd" and estimate an additional amount in case they get a sudden delivery order of, say, 20 pizzas; they can fill the order and then tell one of the crew to mix some extra dough.  Basically, they start and end each day with zero mixed dough.

On your next trip, you might visit one of the 2 Brother's Pizza locations - not for the pizza, which is mediocre, but to see the operation.  They charge 99 cents for a plain slice and the pies just fly out the door.  The guy stretching the dough balls (a second guy adds sauce and cheese) creates an 18-inch "disk," literally, every 30 seconds, non-stop, all day.  No way they could make that much dough much more than an hour ahead of time.

Needless to say, I would love to have that problem in my own place!

Gene


Gene,

Using 0.80% IDY is working for me right now in a cold fermented dough for one day.  The dough in the steel pan does temper enough in my Hatco Unit in about 45 minutes, so really I donít think that is a lot of time for it to rise before the bake.  My same dough has to last all day long, because I wouldnít have time to mix doughs different times during the day or to do those dishes.  

I can see your point in making dough every two hours and that working out well and having extra members of a crew to help.  Yes, I think you are right that with more yeast things would happen faster.  

I donít have the space or luxury of doing that though.  It is only Steve and me working and there are dishes to be done all the time, customers to wait on and give change to, slices to reheat, NY style dough balls to be opened and dressed and lots more stuff to do.  My stand has to be kept fairly neat, because there is no place to hid stuff.  My little pizza stand is only about 8íx13í and all out in the open for everyone to see.  That is one reason I have been working on cold fermenting the dough and then using my Hatco Unit to temper the doughs in the steel pans.

The 2 Brotherís Pizza locations sounds interesting.  When I travel to NYC again, I will try to stop at one of their locations.

Norma

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Re: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!
« Reply #1330 on: January 29, 2013, 06:27:20 AM »
Norma,

We were recently discussing the matter of adjusting finished dough temperature rather than yeast quantity. Recently, while looking for something else, I came across an article by Tom Lehmann at Pizza Today that addresses this matter. It is in the first Q&A at http://www.pizzatoday.com/magazine/2011-november-dough-doctor#.UQev0Wt5mSN. The article also addresses the matter of letting dough balls rest for a while before refrigerating versus going directly to the cooler. It may well be that this is not a problem where the number of dough balls is not large enough to pose cooling problems.

Peter

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Re: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!
« Reply #1331 on: January 29, 2013, 06:59:44 AM »
Norma,

We were recently discussing the matter of adjusting finished dough temperature rather than yeast quantity. Recently, while looking for something else, I came across an article by Tom Lehmann at Pizza Today that addresses this matter. It is in the first Q&A at http://www.pizzatoday.com/magazine/2011-november-dough-doctor#.UQev0Wt5mSN. The article also addresses the matter of letting dough balls rest for a while before refrigerating versus going directly to the cooler. It may well be that this is not a problem where the number of dough balls is not large enough to pose cooling problems.

Peter

Peter,

Thanks for referencing that article from Tom Lehmann.  I see he says not to reduce the amount of IDY because it worked, but created a whole new set of problems at the same time.  I wondered about if the Buddyís clone dough would have enough lift (or rise) in the final bake if less yeast was used, especially since this type of pizza does needs that final lift after the tempering period and the BuddyĎs clone dough after tempering is fragile.  I also wondered since I am doing a two day cold fermented dough balls what effects there will be from that.  You are right though maybe this might not pose a problem where the number of dough balls are not large enough to pose a cooling problem.

I didnít go over to market yesterday to check on my dough balls in the steel pans.  I just have to grate my cheeses and do a few other things this morning.  I could have gone over to market a little later in the afternoon to check after the weather became better, but thought I wouldnít have time to mix all my doughs over again, so what happens today will be interesting. 

On another note, I think I found out why my experimental Lehmann dough balls were almost over fermenting for the last two weeks.  I had thought because I left them at room temperature for awhile, that might be why they wanted to almost overferment.  I really donít think the room temperature affected them that much, but canít be sure.  I found the bottom of my pizza prep fridge really wasnít down enough in temperature after fooling around with it for awhile.  I played around with the knob and before I left market on Sunday the temperature was at 40 degrees F, but I wasnít sure it was going to stay that way, so I loaded the Lehmann dough balls and all the Buddyís clone dough balls in the deli case.  I had a tough time fitting them all in there, but I did.

Norma     

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Re: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!
« Reply #1332 on: January 29, 2013, 08:41:13 PM »
I was glad today that the two day cold fermented Buddyís clone dough balls worked out well from morning until this evening in making Buddyí clone pizzas.  I had 11 Buddyís clone dough balls in steel pans and when they were made into pizzas they all sold all today.  I know 11 pizzas isnít a lot, but that is more than any of my other experimental pizzas sold before when I was trying to introduce them.     

These are only the pictures of the first two Buddyís clone pizzas made today.  The first picture is how much the spacing of the poppy seeds changed until this morning.

Norma

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Re: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!
« Reply #1333 on: January 29, 2013, 08:42:56 PM »
Norma


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Re: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!
« Reply #1334 on: January 29, 2013, 09:09:26 PM »
Norma,

I'm glad to hear that the two-day cold fermented Buddy's clone dough worked out so well for you and lasted throughout the entire day. FYI, the spacing of the poppy seeds suggests an increase in the volume of the dough by about 350%.

Have you and/or Steve noticed much of a difference between pizzas made with a Buddy's emergency clone dough as opposed to ones made with a cold-fermented Buddy's clone dough? And, if so, what were the differences?

It is also good to hear that you sold out your entire production of the Detroit style pizzas. Given the small space you work in, and your limited equipment (refrigeration and the Hatco unit), are there practical limits as to how many pans you can use in your work area?

Peter


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Re: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!
« Reply #1335 on: January 29, 2013, 09:50:50 PM »
Norma,

I'm glad to hear that the two-day cold fermented Buddy's clone dough worked out so well for you and lasted throughout the entire day. FYI, the spacing of the poppy seeds suggests an increase in the volume of the dough by about 350%.

Have you and/or Steve noticed much of a difference between pizzas made with a Buddy's emergency clone dough as opposed to ones made with a cold-fermented Buddy's clone dough? And, if so, what were the differences?

It is also good to hear that you sold out your entire production of the Detroit style pizzas. Given the small space you work in, and your limited equipment (refrigeration and the Hatco unit), are there practical limits as to how many pans you can use in your work area?

Peter



Peter,

Thank you for figuring out that the spacing of the poppy seeds and telling me the poppy seeds suggest an increase in volume of the dough by about 350%.  How much is 350%?  Does that mean it increased by triple and then some?

I donít think Steve and I have noticed much of a difference between the pizzas made with a Buddyís clone emergency dough clone doughs as opposed to one made with a cold-fermented Buddyís clone doughs.  We only got to taste one of the Buddyís clone pizzas from today(that was only one slice).  Steve had brought a different brick cheese along to try on one of the doughs, but we didnít have any dough balls left to try that new brick cheese.  I think it is the taste of the blends of cheeses, the light crumb, the caramelized edges and the crisp bottom crust that makes this type of pizzas so special.  At least Steve didnít complain today that the crust tasted bland.  :-D  Steve can comment if he thinks he noticed any differences between a emergency dough Buddyís clone pizzas, or a cold-fermented dough Buddyís clone pizzas. 

There are practical limits as how many steel pans I can store in my deli case or my pizza prep fridge.  I have to try some more Buddyís clone dough balls in plastic bags.  I only tried one Buddyís clone dough ball like that last week and then put it directly in a steel pan and then tempered it in the Hatco Unit.  That worked out fine, but am not sure how that would work all the time.  Two different times we had 3 Buddyís clone pizzas in the top deck of the oven at one time.  That also seemed to work well.  I think 6 pans could fit in the top deck at one time, but am not sure.  This style of pizza doesnít seem to need to be rotated like a NY style pizza.  Steve told me today to stop making my Lehmann dough pizzas and my Greek style pizzas and just make Detroit style pizzas.  I said I am not ready to do that because customers still do like those style of pizzas also.  I am not sure what my limits are on making 3 styles of pizzas though.  The Hatco Unit does help a lot.

Norma     

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Re: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!
« Reply #1336 on: January 29, 2013, 10:01:38 PM »
Norma,

Yes, the poppy seed spacing suggested a tripling of the dough and then some.

Do you think that you could sell more Detroit style pizzas if you had the capacity?

I'd be curious to know what comments your customers have been offering up about the Buddy's clone pizzas.

Peter

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Re: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!
« Reply #1337 on: January 29, 2013, 10:47:04 PM »
Norma,

Do you think that you could sell more Detroit style pizzas if you had the capacity?

I'd be curious to know what comments your customers have been offering up about the Buddy's clone pizzas.

Peter

Peter,

It is yet to be seen if I can sell more Detroit style pizzas if I have the capacity to store more dough balls.  This is my slower time of the year, so possibly I will be able to sell more Detroit style pizzas when the weather gets warmer in our area, or if word of mouth gets me more customers.  More customers come to market when the weather gets warmer and also more tourists, so I will have to wait and see what happens.

Everyone that has tried the Buddyís clone pizzas have really liked them so far.  I have even gotten new customers that are coming back each week for either one slice or some are taking about 3 slices home to reheat.  From what everyone has been telling Steve and me is that they never tasted a pizza like the Detroit style pizzas I am trying to sell.  Customers have been asking what kind of cheese is on those Detroit style pizzas and Steve and I have been telling them, but today Steve and I decided we arenít going to tell anyone anymore what kind of cheese blend we are using.  Steve and I talked about if a pizza operator wanted to also make this style of pizza and we donít want to give too much information anymore because then they also might want to try to sell this style of pizza.  Many customers do ask what a Detroit style of pizza is.  Most customers do want the squares that have more caramelized edges because they really like those.  This style of pizza also reheats very fast and keeps longer in the heated humidified cabinet.  We did have some customers today waiting for Buddyís clone pizzas to come out of the oven.  I sure donít know, but think this style of pizza takes a lot of timing to figure out how to have this style coming out of the oven all the time.  I guess I will learn more after I make more of this style of pizza on how to become faster.  Also customers are asking for different dressings and it is hard to keep getting them coming out of the oven in time for when they want them.  There have been pretty many customers that have told me and Steve that this is the best style of pizza I have made.  There are lots of other comments that I find interesting.  Who would have ever thought that maybe this style of pizza would take off in our area.  I sure didnít and never even would have thought of trying to offer this style of pizza in our area.  

Norma

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Re: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!
« Reply #1338 on: January 29, 2013, 10:56:17 PM »
I'm not surprised with your success there of the Detroit style at market Norma. Congrats, run with it.... 8)
Bob
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Re: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!
« Reply #1339 on: January 29, 2013, 11:13:05 PM »
I'm not surprised with your success there of the Detroit style at market Norma. Congrats, run with it.... 8)
Bob

Bob,

Thanks, but I will have to wait and see what happens.  If too many customers want this style of pizza I don't know how I will keep up, or if I will have enough room to store the dough balls.  I am glad customers are liking the Detroit style of pizzas though.  It is fun to watch customers faces after they have taken a few bites of a slice.

Norma

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Re: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!
« Reply #1340 on: January 29, 2013, 11:33:45 PM »
Bob,

Thanks, but I will have to wait and see what happens.  If too many customers want this style of pizza I don't know how I will keep up, or if I will have enough room to store the dough balls.  I am glad customers are liking the Detroit style of pizzas though.  It is fun to watch customers faces after they have taken a few bites of a slice.

Norma
That's wonderful Norma....the 'ol bright eyed "oh man!" factor! What we all are trying to achieve...
If it takes off solid for you, none of us here doubt that you'll figure out a way to manage it.  ;)
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Re: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!
« Reply #1341 on: January 30, 2013, 12:02:17 AM »
Peter,

I donít think Steve and I have noticed much of a difference between the pizzas made with a Buddyís clone emergency dough clone doughs as opposed to one made with a cold-fermented Buddyís clone doughs.

Norma     

In my experience, I haven't noticed a difference.  Peter made a separate thread ("Life in Big Bites...") for the recipe I've been using, so I won't repeat it here, but in addition to having the bulk dough rise, I've found that, as that recipe specifies, the dough only needs to sit in the pan for 10 minutes and it spreads easily, so you might not need as many pans as you might think:  If you have room for that much dough, you can leave it all in one piece, in the vessel in which you mixed/rose it and break off a chunk, weigh it and spread it out in the pan 10 minutes before you want to dress it.  So you might want to try it with your own emergency dough.

If you want separate dough balls, then you could still cut down on the number of trays by putting the balls in those aluminum stackable single-ball things or in the wide dough boxes that the Neopolitan pizza guys use, that hold six dough balls.  Well, however you want to handle it (if you do), the point is, with an emergency dough, you might not need any more blue steel pans than are necessary to allow the dough to sit in them for just ten minutes.

Gene
 


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Re: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!
« Reply #1342 on: January 30, 2013, 12:09:11 AM »
Peter,

Customers have been asking what kind of cheese is on those Detroit style pizzas and Steve and I have been telling them, but today Steve and I decided we arenít going to tell anyone anymore what kind of cheese blend we are using.

I sure donít know, but think this style of pizza takes a lot of timing to figure out how to have this style coming out of the oven all the time.  I guess I will learn more after I make more of this style of pizza on how to become faster.  Also customers are asking for different dressings and it is hard to keep getting them coming out of the oven in time for when they want them.

Norma

Norma,

I would just tell the customers that the cheese is your own secret blend.  Why spoil a mystery?

Regarding getting the bake time right, I've been wondering the same thing.  These aren't like ordinary pizzas that sit directly on the oven floor and you can pick them up to see if the bottom is done.  I suspect that's the reason Buddy's switched to a conveyor oven:  You put the pizzas in, sequentially, at one end, each one bakes for precisely the same amount of time, at precisely the same temperature, and pop out at the other end, ready to serve.

Unfortunately, I suspect that you might not have enough room in your stand, plus I hear that those conveyor ovens are expensive.

Gene

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Re: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!
« Reply #1343 on: January 30, 2013, 12:14:00 AM »
Bob,

Thanks, but I will have to wait and see what happens.  If too many customers want this style of pizza I don't know how I will keep up, or if I will have enough room to store the dough balls.  I am glad customers are liking the Detroit style of pizzas though.  It is fun to watch customers faces after they have taken a few bites of a slice.

Norma

Norma,

Well, if people love your pizzas so much that you can't keep up, how about opening an actual restaurant?

Gene

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Re: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!
« Reply #1344 on: January 30, 2013, 07:55:54 AM »
In my experience, I haven't noticed a difference.  Peter made a separate thread ("Life in Big Bites...") for the recipe I've been using, so I won't repeat it here, but in addition to having the bulk dough rise, I've found that, as that recipe specifies, the dough only needs to sit in the pan for 10 minutes and it spreads easily, so you might not need as many pans as you might think:  If you have room for that much dough, you can leave it all in one piece, in the vessel in which you mixed/rose it and break off a chunk, weigh it and spread it out in the pan 10 minutes before you want to dress it.  So you might want to try it with your own emergency dough.

If you want separate dough balls, then you could still cut down on the number of trays by putting the balls in those aluminum stackable single-ball things or in the wide dough boxes that the Neopolitan pizza guys use, that hold six dough balls.  Well, however you want to handle it (if you do), the point is, with an emergency dough, you might not need any more blue steel pans than are necessary to allow the dough to sit in them for just ten minutes.

Gene
 


Gene,

I donít think I am going back to an emergency dough for a Buddyís clone.  As I commented to you before my pizza stand is very small and I would have to get up very early to mix dough before market and I donít want to have to mix more than one batch of dough on market day because there is only Steve and me working.  When the weather gets warmer in our area (can be up to 96 degrees F in the summer inside my market stand) a long day has me tired out.  Attempting emergency dough batches also creates more dirty things to wash and Steve or I have to do all the dishes by hand.  I also donít have a lot of room to stack any kind of pans or wide dough boxes in my coolers.  Regular dough boxes canít even be stacked in my pizza prep fridge.  I learned that from when I first started making pizza about what else to try instead of dough boxes and Tom Lehmann told me to use food plastic bags for my dough balls.  That is what I have been doing for my NY style dough balls since I started making pizza at my small market stand, until now when I started putting the Buddyís clone dough balls directly in the pans. 

On the practical side how would someone manage an emergency dough that is fermented in such a short time, if that the dough only need 10 minutes to rise in a steel pan?  I sure donít know, but would think there would need to be many batches of that dough made each day or the dough would become over fermented.  What happens if there are periods of not selling Detroit style pizzas. 

Norma,

I would just tell the customers that the cheese is your own secret blend.  Why spoil a mystery?

Regarding getting the bake time right, I've been wondering the same thing.  These aren't like ordinary pizzas that sit directly on the oven floor and you can pick them up to see if the bottom is done.  I suspect that's the reason Buddy's switched to a conveyor oven:  You put the pizzas in, sequentially, at one end, each one bakes for precisely the same amount of time, at precisely the same temperature, and pop out at the other end, ready to serve.

Unfortunately, I suspect that you might not have enough room in your stand, plus I hear that those conveyor ovens are expensive.

Gene


I agree it would be better to say the cheese is our own secret blend. 

Regarding the bake time, it is something you learn from watching how the doughs bake in the steel pans and also how the cheeses brown on the top.  I have been playing around with this formulation for a few months so I have learned somewhat when the Buddyís clone pizzas will be done.  At first I timed them, but now I donít have to time the bake. 

I really donít know why Buddyís changed from deck ovens to conveyor ovens, but would imagine they are easier to operate and employees donĎt need to watch the pizzas as closely.  I donít know if you saw in this thread where Peter mentioned what conveyor ovens Buddyís changed to different times.  You are right that I wouldnít have enough room in my stand for a conveyor oven and I like doing things the old-fashioned way of baking in a deck oven.  When I first was thinking about what kind of oven I wanted for my little pizza stand I had considered a conveyor oven, but wanted to bake pizzas in a deck oven after giving it more thoughts.  You are right that new conveyor ovens are very expensive.

Norma,

Well, if people love your pizzas so much that you can't keep up, how about opening an actual restaurant?

Gene



I have thought about what happens if I canít keep up with the Buddyís clone pizzas and my regular pizzas, but I am far too old to open an actual restaurant.  My late husband and I did run 3 other market stands before and also had a concession trailer that we took to other events.  I know how much work that was and sure am not going to get into all that work again.  :-D I get tired just thinking about all of that work we did before.  I had been toying with the idea of purchasing a food truck but really donít think I am up for that either.   

Norma

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Re: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!
« Reply #1345 on: January 30, 2013, 02:15:06 PM »
These are a few of the other Buddyís clone pizzas that were made yesterday and two pictures on how the Buddyís clone dough balls looked when pressing them out in the steel pans right out of the deli case. 

The first pizza had the dressings of cheese blend first, then fresh cut basil, Italian sweet sausage, (that was cut in slices) roasted pepper strips and sauce on the top.  Evís (Steveís) Marco Pollo pizza, cheese and another cheese that ballooned on the sides some (I am not sure why that happened, but at least there wasnít sagging under the sauce).  I didnít have time to take pictures of the other Buddyís clone pizzas made yesterday.

Norma

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Re: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!
« Reply #1346 on: January 30, 2013, 02:16:44 PM »
Norma

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Re: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!
« Reply #1347 on: January 30, 2013, 02:41:52 PM »
Maximus yuminuss!
I like that you're experimenting with different toppings Norma....you have lucky customers.  8)
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

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Re: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!
« Reply #1348 on: January 30, 2013, 02:44:23 PM »
Maximus yuminuss!
I like that you're adding some different toppings Norma....you have lucky customers.  8)

Bob,

That is something I plan more on doing is to add some different toppings on the Buddy's clone pizzas.  It is hard to do that on a NY style pizza that is mostly sold by the slices.

Norma

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Re: Two Billís pizza..dough and Carmelina Sauce..great!
« Reply #1349 on: January 30, 2013, 03:35:50 PM »
Evís (Steveís) Marco Pollo pizza, cheese and another cheese that ballooned on the sides some (I am not sure why that happened, but at least there wasnít sagging under the sauce).
Norma,

Did you note how much IDY you used for the last batch? From the bubbling shown in the photos, it may be that the dough was overly fermented and gassy after two days, and that is why the dough ballooned on the sides. Or possibly the pizza was baked with others and did not have uniform heat distribution.

Peter


 

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