Author Topic: 1st attempt at Cracker style crust  (Read 142 times)

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Offline Talls6

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1st attempt at Cracker style crust
« on: April 14, 2014, 02:35:04 PM »
Hello All,

Here was my 1st attempt at a Cracker style crust Pizza.  I have been a long time lurker at this site and learned a ton of tips and techniques, which I think helped immensely in my 1st attempt.  I have to give up front Credit to Nick57 as I used his modification of the Dough Doctors recipe as my dough base….so I guess I should give credit to the Dough Doctor as well.  I then modified the procedure slightly and added in some Laminations, so some thanks goes to Fazzari as well.  Any way here is what I did.
I used the Dough Calculator to make a 14” pie with a .1 thickness.

Flour - (straight AP as that is what I had) 100%
Water- 45%
Salt - 2%
Yeast - .75%
Oil - 8%
Sugar - a pinch

I put the dry ingredients in the bowl of my Food processor with blade attachment.  I then added the yeast to 105 degree water with a pinch of sugar to wake the little guys up, I waited about 5 minutes and then added the water/yeast and Oil to the flour and salt.  I pulsed until it started to come together but hadn’t formed a cohesive dough yet.  It looked a lot like thick cornmeal at this point.  I dumped the dough into a bowl and pressed together to form a rough ball.  I placed this in a sealed glass bowl for 2 hours at room temp.  At the 2 hour mark I pulled the dough out, flattened and folded back into thirds.  Back into the bowl at Room temp.  At the 4 hours mark I repeated the previous step.  At around the 7 hour mark I floured up the counter and rolled the dough out to 1/8” thickness.  By now the dough had turned very nice.  A little tight yet but not horrible, I then folded the dough in half and then in half again.  (4 layers)  I covered it with a towel and let it rest for about 15 minutes.  I then rolled the dough out again to 1/8” thickness or slightly thinner, put it in my perforated cutter pan, wrapped in plastic wrap and then placed in my refrigerator for about 20 hours.  I took the dough out about 2 hours before cook time.  I preheated the oven to 550 degrees.  I par baked the crust, 3 minutes on the cutter pan and 2 minutes on the stone.  In retrospect I think it was a bit too long.  I let the crust cool to room temp, sauced, topped and baked at 425 for around 8 minutes.  The pie came out really crispy and crackly.  I am well pleased.  Here are some pictures.  Thanks for looking.  Comments are always welcome.
Darren


Offline nick57

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Re: 1st attempt at Cracker style crust
« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2014, 04:29:43 PM »
Great looking pie!! Thanks for the heads up! But, I can't take the credit, I learned everything from the great teachers on this forum. Though I have made some of my own modifications, I am still trying to get to cracker perfection. I have not tried the folding technique, It seems to work well for others here. I'll give it a try.  I have also let the skin do extended time in the fridge, and I like the results. Try using Bread Flour like KABF next time to see if you like the results of the stronger flour. Congrats on a beautiful pie and your results! ;D
« Last Edit: April 14, 2014, 04:32:26 PM by nick57 »

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: 1st attempt at Cracker style crust
« Reply #2 on: April 14, 2014, 06:43:34 PM »
Darren,

Nice job, especially for a first try.

As a point of clarification, what kind of yeast did you use--IDY or ADY?

Peter

Offline Talls6

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Re: 1st attempt at Cracker style crust
« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2014, 08:51:09 AM »
Thanks Nick57 and Pete-zza for the comments.

Nick - I will try the Bread flour next time to see how the differance plays out.  I was also looking at how others use Semolina or Rye Flour in small amounts.  Any experiance with those in this type of crust?  I am a big fan of long rests in the fridge for my dough's.  I find that the flavor gets better as it ages and I can mix the dough up when I have time and pull it out when I need it.  I have left bread dough in the fridge for up to 96 hours. 
Peter - I used IDY for this dough. 

Darren

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: 1st attempt at Cracker style crust
« Reply #4 on: Yesterday at 11:45:59 AM »
If you really want it to be great, don't parbake and don't remove the skin from the fridge until just before you bake. Leaving the laminated skin at room temperature for two hours probably undid the results of all the hard work you put into laminating. Parbaking may have created some kind of laminated appearance, but that kind of "lamination" is not the same thing as the results you get when you keep it cold don't parbake.

Offline Talls6

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Re: 1st attempt at Cracker style crust
« Reply #5 on: Yesterday at 12:29:34 PM »
Thanks for the advice.  I will try that this weekend.
Darren

Offline Aimless Ryan

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Re: 1st attempt at Cracker style crust
« Reply #6 on: Yesterday at 02:52:35 PM »
Since you're paying attention, I'll elaborate a little. When left at room temperature, as I'm sure you know, dough ferments faster than when it's kept in the fridge. With faster fermentation (or faster rise), a laminated skin is likely to merge back into one layer. I'd say two hours at room temperature is way more than enough time for that to happen (but that surely depends on yeast percentage and hydration/oil percentages).

I know fazzari advises keeping the skin cold until right before baking, and he does it that way for the same reasons I do it that way, even though each of us came to the same conclusion totally independent of each other. As you've already figured out, fazzari's work is a very good model to follow with this style.

Also, just about any parbaked skin will end up with the appearance of lamination because the whole skin usually becomes a giant bubble while it's parbaking. (Is that what yours did?) As I said earlier, this creates a crust that kinda looks like lamination, but it's just not the same to me. But do it every way you can think of. That way you'll know from experience how everything works, rather than thinking you know something just because I (or anyone else) told you something.

One more thing: I like AP flour for this style. I've recently used some higher-protein flours to do laminated cracker (using fazzari's "Every trick" instructions) and had good results (at least when I used considerably higher hydration than when I use AP flour), but I think I like AP better. Ideally I'd probably like to find a foodservice-quality flour that's maybe a little higher protein than AP, but for now I like Pillsbury and Gold Medal AP flour for laminated cracker style.
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 02:55:19 PM by Aimless Ryan »

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: 1st attempt at Cracker style crust
« Reply #7 on: Yesterday at 03:08:03 PM »
Darren;
Great "fish mouthing", those are those large football shaped holes so characteristic with a cracker type crust.
Well done!
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline Talls6

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Re: 1st attempt at Cracker style crust
« Reply #8 on: Yesterday at 05:05:39 PM »
Thanks Ryan for the explanation.  It makes sense to me.  Basically I was trying too many techniques and they sort of cancelled each out but "Faked" what I was going for?  You are correct, when I par baked the crust the whole thing blew up like a pita even with the docking.  When I pull it out and cooled it the bubbles stayed.  Is there an advantage to laminating over not?  Thanks for the input on Flour.  That seems to be a varied topic when it comes to Pizza making.  Almost as varied as how a sauce should be made.

Dough Doctor - Thank you for the kind words.  I never knew that was called "fish mouthing". 

Thank you to everyone for the encouragement.  My wife and kids better get used to pizza.   :drool: