Author Topic: Cross Stacking  (Read 1052 times)

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Offline caltheide

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Cross Stacking
« on: October 22, 2012, 05:44:07 PM »
I watched your pizza demonstration videos at the think tank (which were great and informative) and was wondering why you recommend cross stacking.  I'm a home pizza beginner and after mixing I let the dough rise at room temp for an hour coated with oil, but covered then refrigerate overnight in a covered plastic tub.  I though it was best to keep dough covered or it would develop and undesired skin.  What is the purpose of cross stacking and is it useful in a home refrigerator setting?  Thank you, Cindy


Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Cross Stacking
« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2012, 05:57:52 PM »
Cindy;
For overall dough consistency, we don't recommend allowing the dough to ferment at room temperature before putting it into the fridge. The change in dough density makes the dough too difficult to cool uniformly. Instead, immediately after mixing, take the dough to the bench (counter top) cut and form the dough into balls, wipe them lightly with oil and place into individual plastic bags (bread bags work well), DO SEAL, but instead, twist the open end into a pony tail, and tuck the pony tail under the dough ball as you place it into the fridge. By doing this you don't need to use a dough box, and there is no fear of the dough balls drying out. To use the dough, remove from the fridge and allow to temper AT room temperature for 1.5 to 2-hours, then turn the dough out of the bag into a bowl of dusting flour, then open into pizza skins using your perferred method. The purpose of cross stacking the dough boxes (applicable to pizzerias) is to allow for uniform coolong of the dough without the development of unwanted sweating due to condensation forming on the dough during the cooling process. The use of the plastic bags makes the need for dough boxes unnecessary, and it is more compatible with a home refrigerator with its space limitations.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Cross Stacking
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2012, 06:35:59 PM »
Cindy,

One of the things that Tom often suggests for a home setting is that the dough ball be oiled and placed in the refrigerator in its storage container for a period of time and then cover the container. Tom dispenses this advice in Reply 1 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,16246.msg158780.html#msg158780. In my case, where my doughs tend to contain small amounts of yeast and where they do not ferment too quickly, I do not follow Tom's advice. However, if the dough contains a lot of yeast and/or its temperature may promote fast fermentation, then I would be inclined to follow Tom's advice.

There are differences in opinion among the members of this forum with respect to whether the dough should be allowed to warm up for a period of time before refrigerating. In my opinion, if the amount of yeast is on the low side, or if I want to shorten the fermentation time so that the dough is ready when I want to use it, I might let the dough warm up for a brief period of time (usually determined by the amount of yeast and the finished dough temperature) before refrigerating. Evelyn Slomon, author of the pizza cookbook The Pizza Book, discusses both methods at Reply 455 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,576.msg28773.html#msg28773.

As you may have gathered, the principles that apply to pizza dough are similar for a commercial setting and a home setting. However, adjustments sometimes have to be made to adapt a commercial dough to a home setting. In my opinion, the key things to learn and understand is the relationship between the amount of yeast and the fermentation temperature. Depending on the dough formulation, the fermentation can take place completely at ambient (room) temperature, in the refrigerator, or a combination of both.

Pete
« Last Edit: October 24, 2012, 01:12:21 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline caltheide

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Re: Cross Stacking
« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2012, 01:10:26 PM »
Thank you both for the quick responses.  It seems like for every question I ask or look up and get an answer I then have 2 or more questions.  I never realized how much there is to the simple pizza.  This site has so much info and I love how everyone is so willing to help and share any information they have.  This is a great site and so much fun to research.