Author Topic: Dough Elasticity  (Read 2442 times)

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Offline Manalishi

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Dough Elasticity
« on: November 26, 2005, 09:42:29 PM »
I have an elasticity problem, I think.

After my dough rises, I put it on the block and knead about 10x.

When I'm done, it takes for ever to get it stretched out.  Every time I get it stretched out, it comes right back; takes forever.

Does anyone have any idea what I might be doing wrong, or is this normal?

Recipe I use:
3 1/2c flour
1c water
1tsp sugar
1tsp salt
1pk yeast
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Offline chiguy

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Re: Dough Elasticity
« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2005, 11:42:35 PM »
 Hi Manalishi,
 Welcome to the forum. There are a few things that can cause a springy dough. The mix/knead time may need to be increased. The liquid level may need to be increased. If you are refridgerating the dough, it must REST at room temperature for 2 hours before shaping or stretching. If you noticed i captilized the word REST. This is you're problem. When you Re-knead or Re-ball the dough after it has already risen it will alter the gluten structure making the dough tougher to stretch out if not impossible. It may also make for a tougher crust. You must stop this process all together, once you're dough is kneaded and allowed to rise, it's done. Now gentley, take the dough ball from the oiled bowl and gentley flatten it  down onto a well floured table and roll out with a rolling pin. These procedures should really help with the rolling/stretching problems. I also analyzed the bakers percenteges of you're recipe. THESE ARE JUST ESTIMATES
Flour       -3 1/2 C = 100%
Water       1 C       = 46%
Salt           1t         = 1%
Sugar        1t         = 1%
ADY        1pkg        = 1 1/4%   
 I am not sure what type of pizza you are trying to make but 46% water is too low for almost any type of pizza and may also contribute too the lack of elasticity when stretching. You may also think about increasing the water to 9oz from 1 cup. Do not worry about the packet of yeast it should have no problem activating. I assume you may be using an all purpose flour which is good for a thin/cracker crust but also tends not develop a great gluten structure. The pros of using all purpose is that it has a softer bite even at lower water/hydration levels.     Goodluck, Chiguy 

Offline Manalishi

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Re: Dough Elasticity
« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2005, 06:03:46 PM »
Thanks man.  I will try your suggestions and let you know what happened.
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Offline PizzaBrasil

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Re: Dough Elasticity
« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2005, 12:22:11 PM »
Manalishi:

Welcome to the fórum.
I agree with Chiguy that the REST and the HYDRATATION of the dough could solve stretching dough problems.
However, in speaking about increasing the mix/knead time I have a different opinion that him, based on my own experience.
IMHO, less mix/kneading the better.
In another thread (answering Tware) I wrote:

”The lasts attempts were the best results so far (both dough types) with very good oven spring and an open and airy crust and crumb and adequate crust color even without any sugar/milk in the dough.
The dough was made in the usual fashion (using autolyse). The main difference at this time was that the dough was almost not mixed, just stirred by hand with a wood spoon a couple of minutes (after the autolyse process was finished) until the dough do not to stick to the bowl.
When separated from the bowl the dough was placed on a floured counter and gently flattened to a near of a circle (maintaining the most of the air in it) and folded taking the sides to the center, flattened against and folded from top and bottom to the center as well.
The dough rested by approximately 25 minutes and the folded was repeated. Rested and folded again by the third time.
The dough was wet and sticking when first placed on counter, and excellent at the end of the process.
This is a technique that Dan Lepard uses for bread.
Finally, the dough rested by 10-15 minutes, divided and retarded 24 hours in the refrigerator.
The final process was the usual one. One hour out of the refrigerator on the counter (a little lower temperature that the ambient one), shaped on the peel, topped and cooked in a brick oven at 320°C/630°F on hearth (600°C/1100°F ambient temperature) by 2- 21/2 minutes.
As commented, WOW!
I hope this helps”.

May be important to emphasize that the flour that was/is used is a bread flour with only 10% of proteins content (I have no easy access to KA/Caputo or similar ones here).
I hope this helps, too.

Luis


Offline Manalishi

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Re: Dough Elasticity
« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2005, 11:50:54 PM »
Made some pizza the other night.  I let it rest and it turned out a little better.  Just a little more practice I guess.

Thanks guys. 
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Offline Kinsman

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Re: Dough Elasticity
« Reply #5 on: December 06, 2005, 01:45:30 PM »
When you work the dough, the gluten in the flour gets stronger....just let it sit for 10 minutes or so and it will relax.

I think it's good though to stretch the dough out well just before cooking. The gluten is desirable and will give a nice structure to the crust; it's a big factor in making that perfect pizzeria crust.
Chris Rausch

Long Riders BBQ
Florence, Montana


 

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