Author Topic: dough  (Read 2751 times)

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Offline zza newb

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dough
« on: October 26, 2012, 12:28:24 PM »
There is a place here in the Cleveland area that makes very good Pizza. They make both Deep dish and regular flat but not super thin like New York Style.
Here is my question. To me there is a taste in the crust that reminds me of Bisquick. Seeing as a biscuit type crust seems to describe what a deep dish Chicago pizza is it seems to make sense that Bisquick can be used however there seems to be nothing here that mentions this and the only places on line that talk about is Betty Crocker or cooks.com. (I tried those recipes and did not care for them...to bready)
Has any one here played around with Bisquick or is that a no no because Bisquick will rise without using any yeast.
If not how can I get this flavor or taste that I'm chasing
Thanks in advance to anyone who can help
I have had some pretty good success using some or the recipes here but I really want to get this bisquick taste in my pies.


Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: dough
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2012, 03:03:35 PM »
Bisquick is a chemically leavened mix for making biscuits. The leavening system typically used is made from a blend of sodium aluminum phosphate and baking soda, and this is where that flavor you mention comes from. If you want to replicate this flavor try adding a baking powder based on these two ingredients. I stand to be corrected, but if I remember correctly, Calumet brand baking powder is based on SALP and soda, check the labels when you're at the supermarket and you should find it. The amount to use will be about 3% of the total flour weight, and be sure to thoroughly blend it into a little Crisco to encapsulate it before adding it to the dough. Remember, biscuit doughs are just barely stirred together, they are not mixed like a typical pizza dough, and for making pizza, they are best portioned, placed into a plastic bag and refrigerated overnight, then allowed to temper AT room temperature for a couple hours before rolling/sheeting into a pizza skin.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline zza newb

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Re: dough
« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2012, 03:29:48 PM »
Thanks Tom, I will give that a try and report back. 8)

Offline Don K

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Re: dough
« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2012, 03:36:03 PM »
Just curious, what pizza place are you referring to?
The member formerly known as Colonel_Klink

Offline zza newb

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Re: dough
« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2012, 04:00:11 PM »
Danny Boys. there are several in the NE Ohio area. I usally go to the one in Sandusky.

Offline norma427

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Re: dough
« Reply #5 on: October 26, 2012, 09:06:20 PM »
zza newb,
 
I made some experimental pizzas with Bisquick Buttermilk Biscuit mix at Reply 74  http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,13686.msg137842.html#msg137842  and use other Bisquick mixes in later posts in that same thread.  Peter posted the “goody bag” to add to the Bisquick Bisquick Biscuit mix at Reply 63 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,13686.msg137736.html#msg137736  The “goody bag” Peter set-forth seems to work with other Bisquick mixes too. 

Those pizzas turned out tasty in my opinion, but they might not be what you are looking for.

Norma
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Offline Don K

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Re: dough
« Reply #6 on: October 26, 2012, 09:42:28 PM »
Danny Boys. there are several in the NE Ohio area. I usally go to the one in Sandusky.

There is one in Rocky River, not too far from me. I've drove by it but have never tried them yet.
The member formerly known as Colonel_Klink

Offline zza newb

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Re: dough
« Reply #7 on: October 31, 2012, 04:57:52 PM »
Thanks Norma thats exactly what I was looking for. I guess I need to get my butt  in the kitchen and get busy

Offline norma427

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Re: dough
« Reply #8 on: October 31, 2012, 06:07:12 PM »
Thanks Norma thats exactly what I was looking for. I guess I need to get my butt  in the kitchen and get busy

zza newb,

Good luck!  :)

If you need any help let us know.

Norma
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Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: dough
« Reply #9 on: November 01, 2012, 09:34:31 AM »
Norma;
Pizza on a biscuit dough.....this reminds me of the old (dating myself here) Chef Boyardee (SP) pizza mix. As a kid I thought it was great, just add water to the dough portion of the mix and stir, then turn out onto a floured surface and form to about the size of your pan, place the dough into your greased pan and finish by pushing the dough into the corners and sides of the pan, then pull the dough slightly up the sides of the pan. Open the sauce pouch and apply to the dough surface, then apply the supplied cheese. Anybody else remember those days? Probably not the best pizza in town, but it worked in the moment at the time.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor


Offline norma427

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Re: dough
« Reply #10 on: November 01, 2012, 10:33:58 AM »
Norma;
Pizza on a biscuit dough.....this reminds me of the old (dating myself here) Chef Boyardee (SP) pizza mix. As a kid I thought it was great, just add water to the dough portion of the mix and stir, then turn out onto a floured surface and form to about the size of your pan, place the dough into your greased pan and finish by pushing the dough into the corners and sides of the pan, then pull the dough slightly up the sides of the pan. Open the sauce pouch and apply to the dough surface, then apply the supplied cheese. Anybody else remember those days? Probably not the best pizza in town, but it worked in the moment at the time.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Tom,

I do remember using Chef Boyardee pizza mixes (I am older than you are), but don’t even remember what they tasted like.  I probably thought they were great though.  I agree it worked before I knew anything about making pizza.  :) I really didn’t know Chef Boyardee pizza mix is like a biscuit.  I learn something new everyday. 

I have a Jiffy Pizza Mix at market, but never got around to trying it out.  Maybe one of these days.

With Peter’s “goody bag” that Betty Crocker buttermilk mix pizza turned out very good.

Norma
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Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: dough
« Reply #11 on: November 01, 2012, 03:13:14 PM »
Hi Norma;
There aren't many of us that either go back that far, or can remember back that far, much less partook in such a gourmet delight!
You probably remember TV Time Popcorn too.
Tom Lehmann/TDD

Offline norma427

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Re: dough
« Reply #12 on: November 01, 2012, 04:05:55 PM »
Hi Norma;
There aren't many of us that either go back that far, or can remember back that far, much less partook in such a gourmet delight!
You probably remember TV Time Popcorn too.
Tom Lehmann/TDD

Tom,

Yep the good old days, I do remember TV Time Popcorn.  I soon will be 66 years old, so I have a lot I remember from years ago.   :-D

Norma
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Offline zza newb

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Re: dough
« Reply #13 on: November 03, 2012, 07:16:11 PM »
OK using the deep dish calculator this is what I come up with. If its wrong its to late. :-[ It's already mixed.
It looks a little oily but we will see what happens after it rises. :-\ It will sit in the fridge over night. I want it to rise at least once before I refrigerate it.  8)
This one does not use Bisquick. I going with the bakeing powder and hoping I get that flavor. :chef:


Flour (100%):    550.45 g  |  20.02 oz | 1.25 lbs
Water (60%):    340.47 g  |  12.01 oz | 0.75 lbs
ADY (.7%):    3.97 g | 0.14 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.05 tsp | 0.35 tbsp
Salt (1%):    5.67 g | 0.2 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.02 tsp | 0.34 tbsp
Olive Oil (3%):    17.02 g | 0.6 oz | 0.04 lbs | 3.78 tsp | 1.26 tbsp
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (10%):    56.74 g | 2 oz | 0.13 lbs | 4.16 tbsp | 0.26 cups
Shortening (4%):    22.7 g | 0.8 oz | 0.05 lbs | 5.68 tsp | 1.89 tbsp
Sugar (1%):    5.67 g | 0.2 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.42 tsp | 0.47 tbsp
Semolina (15%):    85.12 g | 3 oz | 0.19 lbs | 8.15 tbsp | 0.51 cups
Baking powder (3%) 17g  I did use Calumet
Total (194.7%):   1104.82 g | 38.97 oz | 2.44 lbs | TF = 0.15965
« Last Edit: November 03, 2012, 07:25:20 PM by zza newb »

Offline zza newb

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Re: dough
« Reply #14 on: November 03, 2012, 07:18:57 PM »
Oh I forgot to mention this is for a 14" deep dish. :pizza:

Offline zza newb

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Re: dough
« Reply #15 on: November 03, 2012, 10:40:46 PM »
Well so far so good. :) The dough has risen nicely and it seems to have obsorbed the oil.
Now it's off the the fridge till tomorrow.
I took pictures but after resizing them 3 times they are still to big..... ::)  I give..UNCLE :-[

Online Chicago Bob

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Re: dough
« Reply #16 on: November 03, 2012, 11:59:17 PM »
here you go friend....after selecting your pic from your file...scroll down to the kilo box and type in 128...done deal.  ;)
http://www.picresize.com/results
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Offline zza newb

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Re: dough
« Reply #17 on: November 04, 2012, 08:15:42 AM »
here you go friend....after selecting your pic from your file...scroll down to the kilo box and type in 128...done deal.  ;)
http://www.picresize.com/results


Thats the program I have been trying to use and it's driving my crazy. After I select the picture the kilo box is gone and asks for percent of shrinkage. 

buceriasdon

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Re: dough
« Reply #18 on: November 04, 2012, 08:24:34 AM »
I use and recommend this free easy to use photo resizer: http://www.imageoptimizer.net/Pages/Home.aspx

Offline zza newb

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Re: dough
« Reply #19 on: November 04, 2012, 08:33:00 AM »
I use and recommend this free easy to use photo resizer: http://www.imageoptimizer.net/Pages/Home.aspx


Again, how do you know when the picture is small enough? This reduces to pixels not kb. :-[