Author Topic: volume vs weight %  (Read 905 times)

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Offline mkevenson

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volume vs weight %
« on: November 04, 2012, 01:07:03 PM »
I am reading a recipe here for a same day dough. The member has used volume measurements. ie 3.5-3.75 cups flour and 1.5 cups water. This volume meas =40- 42.8% hydration.
When I convert the volume meas to weight (grams) I get 479g flour and 355g water which = 74% hydration.
Big difference! No?

Should I use the volume or weight ratio for hydration?

Mark
"Gettin' better all the time" Beatles


buceriasdon

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Re: volume vs weight %
« Reply #1 on: November 04, 2012, 01:59:25 PM »
Mark, Why even look at a vague volume recipe when there is an abundance of precise measurement recipes on the forum? Nothing better to do than guess what method was used to measure the flour?
Don

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: volume vs weight %
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2012, 02:43:14 PM »
That formual could easily be as low as 61% hydration. My typical scooping method results in around 155g/C flour.

Volumetric hydration is meaningless.
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline La Sera

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Re: volume vs weight %
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2012, 04:50:11 PM »
That is exactly why baker's percent is based on weight. An American cup, and Imperial cup and a metric cup are all different. A gram is a gram is a gram.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: volume vs weight %
« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2012, 05:19:15 PM »
That is exactly why baker's percent is based on weight. An American cup, and Imperial cup and a metric cup are all different. A gram is a gram is a gram.

Not only are there several different types of cups, the weight of flour you can get in them varies significantly depending on how you measure. The weight of flour in a US customary cup could be as little as  124g or perhaps as high as 170g. That's a 37% swing!
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline mkevenson

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Re: volume vs weight %
« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2012, 07:49:30 PM »
I agree with all comments, and use weight  as my measuring tool. The question tho remains, the pizzas (3), created by the poster using volume measurements, reportedly were great, they looked good and several respected members so proclaimed. What interested me was the fact that the dough was allowed to rise for a couple hours. I wanted to try the recipe but am confused by the hydration %. Perhaps it best to just look for a weight based , quick prep dough, or , just wing it!!!!!!

Mark
"Gettin' better all the time" Beatles

Offline pizzaneer

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Re: volume vs weight %
« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2012, 08:21:26 PM »
If you wing it, take careful measurements so that you can duplicate it in the future.  If there is confusion, figure that the recipe was on the high side (packed volume) for flour, and compensate accordingly.
I'd rather eat one good meal a day than 3 squares of garbage.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: volume vs weight %
« Reply #7 on: November 04, 2012, 08:21:41 PM »
Can you post a link to the recipe?
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: volume vs weight %
« Reply #8 on: November 05, 2012, 08:03:09 AM »
Mark;
Hydration percent should always be based on the actual weight measures.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline mkevenson

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Re: volume vs weight %
« Reply #9 on: November 05, 2012, 11:28:01 AM »
Can you post a link to the recipe?


http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,20769.0.html

Initially I did not realize that there was a page 2 of this thread. I did find it yesterday and realize that the weight measurements were provided by Bert.
Thank you for all your replys.

Mark
"Gettin' better all the time" Beatles


 

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