Author Topic: deactivated yeast  (Read 963 times)

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Offline air540g

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deactivated yeast
« on: December 11, 2012, 12:01:01 PM »
I find some recipes using IDY+ deactivated yeast.

Why do they use deactivated yeast?


Offline Jet_deck

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Re: deactivated yeast
« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2012, 12:25:52 PM »

Why do they use deactivated yeast?

What is deactivated yeast?
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Offline PizzaJerk

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Re: deactivated yeast
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2012, 12:40:59 PM »
Yeast is a living organism, I think the only way to "deactivate" it would be to kill it with hot water in which case it is of no use.
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Offline air540g

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Re: deactivated yeast
« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2012, 01:02:57 PM »
Yeast is a living organism, I think the only way to "deactivate" it would be to kill it with hot water in which case it is of no use.

 it is a kind of bread product sold in market. I find they use IDY+deactivated yeast.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: deactivated yeast
« Reply #4 on: December 11, 2012, 01:12:16 PM »
Deactivated or dead yeast is used both as a flavoring agent (no, it does NOT provide a yeasty flavor), and as a reducing agent, similar to L-cysteine (PZ-44) to both shorten the mixing time of the dough and provide greater extensibility in the dough for easier forming, especially under commercial (large scale) production/processing parameters.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor