Author Topic: Dough Trough size?  (Read 4011 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Dough Trough size?
« Reply #20 on: October 09, 2012, 06:18:48 PM »
Nick,

In his book, American Pie, Peter Reinhart talked about how Chris Bianco made his dough. I reported on that matter at Reply 43 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4693.msg41567/topicseen.html#msg41567. I'd be somewhat surprised if Chris still makes his dough by hand.

Brian Spangler at one time made his dough by hand but the rigors of doing that for so many years finally got to him. He ended up buying a really old Hobart mixer. I think Anthony Mangieri is still making his dough by hand.

Peter


Offline weemis

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Re: Dough Trough size?
« Reply #21 on: October 10, 2012, 07:54:13 AM »
That is a beautiful dough bowl, I never would've guessed it was newly made and not an antique. My dad found a really old dough bowl that is probably a few inches longer than yours in an old house on some land that one of his friends bought. Luckily the guy didn't care about antiques or anything to do with old stuff, so he sold it to dad for $20. It isn't cracked anywhere and is about the same depth as yours I suppose. I've never been able to make a large enough batch of anything to get to use it, but hearing that someone here is actually working with one makes me wanna go get a ton of flour and freeze a bunch of dough balls. :-D I wonder what else people have prepare in dough bowls way back when.

I bet you don't get a lot of oxidation in the dough working with that amount do you? Seems Kenji over at Slice really pushes that oxidation reduces rising and maybe it does, I just have never read up on it or tested it.

$20! heck yeah. what a deal. you should post a picture! i'd love to see it.

I make every batch of dough in the bowl, even if I'm only making a couple balls. It's just where my dough gets made. It is funny working a tiny ball of dough in this huge bowl, but it really makes clean-up a cinch! I use it every time!

Not sure about oxidation. I never looked into it or what affects it.
Nick Gore - just a dough eyed wanderer

Offline weemis

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Re: Dough Trough size?
« Reply #22 on: October 10, 2012, 07:56:13 AM »
Nick,

In his book, American Pie, Peter Reinhart talked about how Chris Bianco made his dough. I reported on that matter at Reply 43 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4693.msg41567/topicseen.html#msg41567. I'd be somewhat surprised if Chris still makes his dough by hand.

Brian Spangler at one time made his dough by hand but the rigors of doing that for so many years finally got to him. He ended up buying a really old Hobart mixer. I think Anthony Mangieri is still making his dough by hand.

Peter


I'd like to see those people actually make these large batches of dough. Maybe I'm just doing it wrong an that's what's making it so tough... or maybe I just need to work out a little more  ;)
Nick Gore - just a dough eyed wanderer

Offline kiwipete

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Re: Dough Trough size?
« Reply #23 on: October 10, 2012, 03:36:49 PM »
I'd like to see those people actually make these large batches of dough. Maybe I'm just doing it wrong an that's what's making it so tough... or maybe I just need to work out a little more  ;)

Just a guess here:

I think the bread bakers in the old days (before mixers) would just fold and stretch the dough repeatedly rather than actually knead it. It develops the gluten just as well and is not anywhere near as hard on the arms and hands.

I remember reading a story on the web some time ago about a commercial baker who was going to bake a 100+ loaves one Friday evening to take to Saturday market, but his mixer broke down. He rang an old timer baker/colleague, who advised him to just fold the dough.

Peter

Offline JConk007

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Re: Dough Trough size?
« Reply #24 on: October 10, 2012, 10:47:04 PM »
Nick I have the plans for the one Franco Pepe uses I will get it for you.
I Love to Flirt with Fire! www.flirtingwithfirepizza.com

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Dough Trough size?
« Reply #25 on: November 02, 2012, 03:28:33 PM »
That big wood mixing bowl looks a whole lot like one we have in our baking museum, the only difference is that ours is a lot older. It served the same function though. The neat thing about wood mixing bowls and wood dough troughs (commonly used here in the U.S. until the 50's especially in cracker production) was that they would hold bacteria (lactic acid forming bacteria/lacotbacillis) and inoculate the dough that was placed into them much like we would use a sourdough starter today. When the cracker industry moved away from the wood troughs they had to identify the specific bacteria, culture it, and add it to the dough to get the same finished flavor profile that they had with the wood troughs.
As for mixing the dough without power, there is a pizzeria in the Pittsburgh area where the owner has a long stainless steel trough, he measures out his water in a pail, adds it to the trough, adds flour, salt and sugar, then wets his hands and arms and spreads cake yeast over them as one might use soap, he then proceeds to hand mix the dough just until it comes together, after that he allows biochemical fermentation to do the rest of the work for him. It is quite a store, people come in just to watch him make his dough.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor


 

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