Author Topic: Fire brick question  (Read 2828 times)

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Offline Nathan

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Fire brick question
« on: December 08, 2005, 11:08:24 AM »
I know fire bricks have been discussed several times but I did a search and didn't find exactly what I was looking for.

Has anyone ever tried completely lining the bottom shelf in the oven with them then putting the stone on top of them and cooking on the stone?  What about putting them above?  Or both?  I'm trying to figure out how to get maximum heat retension in my oven since we've been making so many pizzas around here.  I adjusted the thermometer and it will get up to a little over 600 now. But the way we're doing it is, as soon as a pizza goes in the next one starts getting put together on the peel, and depending on what's on the pizza (most have been supremes lately) usually the one in the oven is done by the time the next pizza is ready to be put in.  We open the oven and pull that one out and put the next one in at the same time.  The problem is is after doing this several times the oven drops down to about 450-500 and each one takes a little longer to get done than the one before it.  I'm just trying to figure out a way to minimize the heat loss.

Tomorrow night we're making more than we've ever done in one night. I have 18 doughballs made as of right now and may have to make a few more later on today depending on whether or not we get any more orders.

Any thoughts?
"Pizza with pineapples?  That's a cake."


Offline Randy

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Re: Fire brick question
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2005, 12:01:53 PM »
Yes, prevent burning down your house, use pizza screens.  Using fire bricks is another very bad idea.

Offline chiguy

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Re: Fire brick question
« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2005, 12:06:27 PM »
 Hi Nathan,
 I have seen members try the process of try to build a hearth in thier home ovens. It seems mostly experimental with the thought of trying to emulate a commercial pizza oven. I think you are going to need a commercial pizza oven. I am surprised you survived this long doing 18 pizzas in you're oven. A commercial pizza oven will maintain ambient as well as deck temperature. I think you should at least be leaning in this direction and keep you're eye open for auctions or sales of a oven in you're area. You may find an offer you can't refuse.           Goodluck, Chiguy

Offline Nathan

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Re: Fire brick question
« Reply #3 on: December 08, 2005, 12:06:39 PM »
Why will they explode or something?   ???
"Pizza with pineapples?  That's a cake."

Offline Nathan

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Re: Fire brick question
« Reply #4 on: December 08, 2005, 12:09:08 PM »
Well right now my first priority is a mixer.  Then I'll be looking for a decent "real" oven for sure. 

Thanks for the replies.
"Pizza with pineapples?  That's a cake."

Offline JAG

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Re: Fire brick question
« Reply #5 on: December 08, 2005, 12:43:12 PM »
Nathan,
I seem to remember a member mentioning that he burned the floor under his stove by using fire bricks in his oven. All equipment home or professional has limitations. Unless you are in a test lab with safety controls in place it isn't worth pushing to the point of catastrophic failure.

If you are that busy making pizzas at home you should check into getting a Bakers Pride countertop dect oven. I have one at my icecream shop and it works awesome. It is brick lined, and has 2, 20"x20" decks, model BL-S22. They also have a 4 deck BL-S44.
Mine operates on 208 single phase, but they have different configurations for power.

The quest for pizza is a great one but not worth burning down your home.

JAG

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Fire brick question
« Reply #6 on: December 08, 2005, 12:47:36 PM »
Nathan,

That's a tough one because the oven design and thermodynamics are not in your favor.

To give you a general idea, a commercial Baker's Pride deck oven, such as a Y-500, can handle about 150 16-inch pies an hour, at a temperature of around 475 degrees F, and with a good oven tender who can move 4 pies around at a time. The deck has a lot of thermal mass and a small cavity. Obviously, there is no way that you can get even close, proportionately, with a home oven and one pie at a time. If you have up and down ovens available to you, each with its own stone, at least you could improve your efficiency significantly. I assume for the moment that this is not an option available to you.

I have tried using two pizza stones, one above the other on separate oven racks, and have not detected a great improvement in the finished product, in terms of its quality or bake time. However, I think that increasing the thermal mass in your oven in other ways should help, along with making liberal use of your broiler element. For example, you might put two stones on top of each other, or one or more layers of tile along with the stone you are now using. Because of the greater amount of "stone mass" to preheat, it will take longer to get it to its maximum temperature--in direct proportion to the stone mass. However, once that temperature is reached, the stone mass will hold the heat longer also. Some oven heat will escape when you open the oven door, of course, but the stone mass will still be quite hot because of its relatively high thermal capacity. You can even open the oven door to get the bottom heating element to kick in again and close the door once it does. To make up for some of the heat loss in the stone mass as more pizzas are made, you might use your broiler element to keep the oven heat elevated, as by turning on the broiler element when you deposit a pizza on the stone mass. You might even use the broiler element to help bake the top of the pizza. Steve has used these techniques before for single pizzas, and he has even used tiles arranged vertically on the sides (he uses a double layer of tiles on the lower oven rack position to get greater thermal mass), so it appears that the approach works. How well it will work for 18 pizzas is an open question. If you decide to use layers of tile on a lower rack, I would leave some space at the perimeter so that the oven heat can reach the top of the pizzas.

I hope you will let us know how things turn out, one way or the other.

Peter

Offline Perk

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Re: Fire brick question
« Reply #7 on: January 30, 2006, 10:12:47 AM »
I can't comment on extra bricks.
But my personal opinion is slow down.
I think people are in too much of a rush to get pizzas rolling out of their oven.
Remember this is just a stove not a pizza oven.
18 dough balls? WOW!
You make that many pizza's? It is time for a real pizza oven.

I watch my pizza from start to finish, then I make another one. This allows the oven to recoup it's heat loss.

It also makes the pizza party people anxious to get the next pizza. But it' would not be good for 18 pizza's.
some people have a beer refrigerator in their garage. I think you may need a pizza oven you your garage. LOL!

Remember making home pizza is an event, not really a food service.
Make it fun, relax, get people involved. Just don't invite that many people over at one time! LOL!




-Dave
Jacksonville Fl.

Offline Fio

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Re: Fire brick question
« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2006, 11:39:59 AM »
I can't comment on extra bricks.
But my personal opinion is slow down.
I think people are in too much of a rush to get pizzas rolling out of their oven.
Remember this is just a stove not a pizza oven.
18 dough balls? WOW!
You make that many pizza's? It is time for a real pizza oven.

I watch my pizza from start to finish, then I make another one. This allows the oven to recoup it's heat loss.

It also makes the pizza party people anxious to get the next pizza. But it' would not be good for 18 pizza's.
some people have a beer refrigerator in their garage. I think you may need a pizza oven you your garage. LOL!

Remember making home pizza is an event, not really a food service.
Make it fun, relax, get people involved. Just don't invite that many people over at one time! LOL!


Very wise words indeed. :D

Of course, my solution to this problem is to build a brick oven in my backyard.  With a fire constantly burning at 700 degrees, and a ton of thermal mass, you can cook pizzas faster than you can press out the dough.  A  pizza party with 20 pies is a real possibility.  8)

I just gotta wait for the weather to get better to start building.  :-\
Since joining this forum, I've begun using words like "autolyze" and have become anal about baker's percents.  My dough is forever changed.