Author Topic: How old is your yeast?  (Read 1682 times)

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Offline jeff v

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How old is your yeast?
« on: November 23, 2012, 10:37:25 PM »
Just re-realized this. I bought 2lbs of idy at Sams or Costco after joining the forum in June 2007. It "expired" in Feb 2008. I keep waiting for a batch with little or no rise, but it's still going strong.

Anyone else use old yeast?
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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: How old is your yeast?
« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2012, 10:44:26 PM »
No. It's too inexpensive to risk using it. I pitch it if it gets anywhere near the date.
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Offline jeff v

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Re: How old is your yeast?
« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2012, 11:05:47 PM »
No. It's too inexpensive to risk using it. I pitch it if it gets anywhere near the date.

I understand. I am an absolute date freak on food in general including flour and grains. Not sure how this originally happened but its become a curiosity to see if I can use it all.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2012, 11:40:42 PM by jeff v »
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Offline canadianbacon

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Re: How old is your yeast?
« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2012, 11:48:46 PM »
No yeast is "too risky " lol, who cares if you lose a few cups of flour.  I have yeast that is a few years old and it works fine.

I think people are too hung up over year expiry dates and exact measurements of flour vs water, vs oil.  Pop it in, mix it up and
enjoy your pizza.  That is about it.

If your yeast still works, you will know pretty quickly, and hey......... with pizza it doesn't matter... we are making pizza... not bread
so if it doesn't rise like it should ( 75% rise instead of 100% who cares ) :-)

Just my thoughts :-)
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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: How old is your yeast?
« Reply #4 on: November 24, 2012, 01:02:24 AM »
I could care less about a few cups of flour, but if a batch of dough fails and I get no pizza, I'll start breaking things more expensive than flour. Why on earth would you risk all that goes into a batch of pizza or loaf of bread over a couple pennies worth of yeast???
Pizza is not bread.

Offline Don K

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Re: How old is your yeast?
« Reply #5 on: November 24, 2012, 01:25:07 AM »
I buy the 4oz. jars of IDY and I use it fast enough that I've never even came close to the date. Seems like it's about 2 years.

Does IDY last longer than ADY?

Not necessarily yeast, but doesn't it seem like expiration dates on food have gotten shorter and shorter over the last several years? I'm wondering if food manufacturers are expiring their food sooner so you'll buy more.

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Offline Ev

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Re: How old is your yeast?
« Reply #6 on: November 24, 2012, 07:12:17 AM »
[quote author=Colonel_Klink

Not necessarily yeast, but doesn't it seem like expiration dates on food have gotten shorter and shorter over the last several years? I'm wondering if food manufacturers are expiring their food sooner so you'll buy more.


[/quote]

I think you're right about that. I found some ADY packets in my hobby fridge over 2 years past date. They worked just fine.

Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: How old is your yeast?
« Reply #7 on: November 24, 2012, 07:56:04 AM »
Weird that your Costco bulk IDY is still going strong.   I  bought the same 2 pack and gave one away.  The other pack I split into 2 jars.  One I kept at room temps of 75F year round, while the other sat in the freezer.   After about a year and a half, the room temp jar was producing noticeable less lift.  I did a side by side comparison and the freezer/thawed yeast has near original lifting power while the older yeast is petering out.   I still buy IDY in bulk, but keep the unused portion in the freezer.  All but just a small tuperware's worth to get through about 6 months, then I replenish. 

Offline jeff v

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Re: How old is your yeast?
« Reply #8 on: November 24, 2012, 09:14:19 AM »
Weird that your Costco bulk IDY is still going strong.   I  bought the same 2 pack and gave one away.  The other pack I split into 2 jars.  One I kept at room temps of 75F year round, while the other sat in the freezer.   After about a year and a half, the room temp jar was producing noticeable less lift.  I did a side by side comparison and the freezer/thawed yeast has near original lifting power while the older yeast is petering out.   I still buy IDY in bulk, but keep the unused portion in the freezer.  All but just a small tuperware's worth to get through about 6 months, then I replenish. 

Mine is kept in the freezer too. I scoop out what I need for that bake and back it goes.
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Online Pete-zza

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Re: How old is your yeast?
« Reply #9 on: November 24, 2012, 09:36:48 AM »
This is a subject that has long intrigued me.

For example, on the commercial side, the advice on the use and storage of yeast tends to be very conservative. See, for example, Tom Lehmann's PMQ Think Tank post at http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?p=50956#p50956. See, also the Lallemand chart at the bottom of page 1 at http://www.lallemand.com/BakerYeastNA/eng/PDFs/LBU%20PDF%20FILES/1_6DRYYE.PDF, and also the Lallemand article Working with Instant Yeast at http://www.lallemand.com/BakerYeastNA/eng/PDFs/LBU%20PDF%20FILES/2_9INST.PDF. Since professionals can go through large amounts of yeast in the course of their pizza operations, and usually in fairly short order, I suspect that their yeast remains quite fresh and that they are able to abide by the advice given to them by the experts like Tom Lehmann and the yeast producers. And it makes good sense to follow that advice since they do not want to put their dough production at risk simply because they chose not to heed that advice. For them, yeast is too cheap to put their production at risk.

However, on the home side, the above advice is routinely ignored. We have many members who, in the interest of being economical, purchase their yeast, and especially dry yeast, in one- or two-pound bags. Whatever they do not need to use at any given time they either store in their freezers or in their refrigerator compartments. Some will remove a small amount from the freezer to the refrigerator compartment for near-term use and return the rest to their freezers. Tom Lehmann recommends that yeast that is to be stored for future use be put in a airtight sealed container. And before putting the yeast in the sealed container, he suggests that the bag be closed securely, as by closing the bag tightly and wrapping a rubber band around it. That is the approach that I use to store my dry yeast in my freezer. '

According to the Lallemand yeast people, and as noted in the second pdf document referenced above, IDY does lose some of its leavening power with age. As the article mentions, IDY activity may decline 10 to 15 percent over the first one to two years after production, then more slowly after that. And that apparently is for IDY still in its unopened package. Lallemand says that if an opened package is stored in a closed container in the freezer, it will remain stable for at least three months. For many of our members, that period is not months and can often be measured in years. Since aging of yeast under these circumstances no doubt causes even further loss of leavening power, one way of compensating for that loss is to use more of the yeast than called for by the dough recipe. In my case, I use the volume measurements for yeast as specified by the dough calculating tools. Having selected the conversion factors for yeast for the dough calculating tools, I know that those numbers are not exact, simply because I know that yeast changes in so many ways during aging and storage and under different environmental condition. I also know that members don't always use level measurements of yeast. They might use a "scant" or "rounded" measurement instead of a "level" one. So, its anyone's guess as to how much yeast is actually being used in any given case. Even weighing the yeast is not a guarantee of accuracy since the weight of dry yeast will change with age. And some digital scales, even good ones, do not always accurately measure out small amounts of yeast. I compensate for all of these factors by simply using a bit more yeast than the recipe or the dough calculating tools call for. This might alter the fermentation process in one direction or the other, but the difference might not be enough to worry about.

I think it is also telling that following the above methods I cannot recall having lost a single pizza because of a yeast failure. I have read of yeast problems by other members, and sometimes I am perplexed why they sustained losses when they seemed to have done everything correctly, but perhaps just as often it was due to improper use of the yeast, and especially ADY.

Peter
« Last Edit: January 25, 2013, 11:31:51 AM by Pete-zza »


Offline jeff v

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Re: How old is your yeast?
« Reply #10 on: November 24, 2012, 10:35:18 AM »
Hi Peter,

Like you I use the volume measure for yeast. While I haven't given it much thought I do use rounded measurements-I suppose to make up for any "lost" rise. I keep mine in a the original foil bag with the top rolled down and put that in a ziplock bag in the freezer.

Doing some searching it seems experts are divided on how long or how to store yeast too. This thread from the fresh loaf attributes some very different advice from a couple of authors. http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/6030/storage-instant-yeast
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Offline widespreadpizza

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Re: How old is your yeast?
« Reply #11 on: November 24, 2012, 10:56:55 AM »
Hey all,  couple things on expiration dates.  As for the window of time getting shorter before the expiration date comes up,  I think what we are seeing and i hope is lees and less preservatives being used in our foods,  and if not none less of them or a natural version instead of a man made one.  Also,  I know I am very conscious of what I buy for food products,  and am sure that has narrowed down the playing field in my pantry to things that aren't going to last forever.  Also,  along the way one of the people I know that makes hot sauce told me that his would basically never go bad unopened,  but the FDA makes him put a 2 year code on it,  they do that with just about anything.  Check out the nearest water bottle to you.  just under 2 years left to it right?  Like this water is going to go bad....  There was a study I read about medicine potency that went back  something like 25 years,  most of it was still in the allowable potency range and posed no problems.  At the end of the day,  I think that between the FDA forcing dates,  and the manufacturers wanting us to re-buy a lot of stuff goes to waste.....  I too have used yeast well beyond its date..  -marc

Offline Woodfiredovenpizzero

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Re: How old is your yeast?
« Reply #12 on: November 24, 2012, 12:39:52 PM »
From my last yeast purchase at Sam's I have what is left on a bag in the freezer and the unopened bag in the pantry. Now, I'm not at home right now but I believe it has an expiration date of March 2013.

If the bag still unopened in its original vacuum pack, would that expiration date be effective if the bag was unopened (which I don't think so) or will expired on March regardless?

Edgar

Offline RobynB

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Re: How old is your yeast?
« Reply #13 on: November 24, 2012, 07:48:05 PM »
I'm still working through a pound of IDY I ordered from KA back in 2009, it's been stored air-tight in the freezer the whole time.  I just checked the dates (wrote them down when I transferred to container) and it says "Best before 09-2011".  Guess I should replace it  :P   I use such a tiny quantity of yeast (my normal batch is 1000 grams flour for which I use 1/8 tsp yeast) and I hate to waste stuff.... 

Offline jeffereynelson

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Re: How old is your yeast?
« Reply #14 on: November 25, 2012, 02:26:55 AM »
The yeast I am using is past expiration too. I feel that those little packets and jars are expensive and can go quick and the big bags are really cheap but hard to use. I guess I want a middle.

Offline Jackitup

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Re: How old is your yeast?
« Reply #15 on: November 25, 2012, 04:15:42 AM »
Pound bag, mason jar, in the fridge. My last mason jar lasted 5+ years I think. I'll have to look when I get home from work at the date on the present mason jar. I started it again with 1 pound about a year ago I think. I take out what I need, screw cap back on and back in the fridge. I haven't found any reason to freeze. KEY is the air tight 'glass' jar. Not a foil bag, pouch or envelope. Spices will also last WAY beyond what you think stored like this, air tight in a cool dark place

jon
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Offline Jackitup

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Re: How old is your yeast?
« Reply #16 on: November 25, 2012, 09:13:24 AM »
1/10/12 is the date I started this jar and it's still 2/3 full. Should hit that 5 year mark again at least. Works as good as the first day. Now for a quiet couple fingers of E & J XO and bed after a very nice nite at work, yes....nice! Fun, skilled group that stayed on top of things in the ICU with very few snags ;D

jon
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Offline Ev

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Re: How old is your yeast?
« Reply #17 on: November 25, 2012, 11:10:47 AM »
1/10/12 is the date I started this jar and it's still 2/3 full. Should hit that 5 year mark again at least. Works as good as the first day. Now for a quiet couple fingers of E & J XO and bed after a very nice nite at work, yes....nice! Fun, skilled group that stayed on top of things in the ICU with very few snags ;D

jon

That's what I do as well. I've never had a yeast failure yet.

Offline sebdesn

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Re: How old is your yeast?
« Reply #18 on: December 29, 2012, 05:00:08 PM »
had the same thing couple weeks ago,but found one two years newer in the fridge,it has a 2014use by,,will use that
Bud

Offline mkevenson

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Re: How old is your yeast?
« Reply #19 on: December 30, 2012, 05:32:13 PM »

Does IDY last longer than ADY?




yes, because 4oz of IDY when using 1/2 as much as ADY, will last 2x as long.

Mark
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