Author Topic: Newbie with a few dumb questions  (Read 3433 times)

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Offline Shystev99

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Newbie with a few dumb questions
« on: December 10, 2005, 02:41:59 PM »
Hi all,
I'm new to the group and am pretty new to pizza making.
I recently bought my first deep dish pizza pan this week, It is a 12" hard coat aluminum type pan. And was wondering how to go about seasoning it?
I have searched the forum here looking for the answer before I asked, But I'm just not finding it through searching keywords or posts.
I have also gone to other websites trying to find a way and have heard from everything to use olive oil, to shortening, to bake french fries in it a few times.

My plan was to season it the same way I seasoned my cast Iron grill pan, Which was just just coat it with a layer of shortening and bake it for half an hour or so. I was going to season the pizza pan 2 or 3 times before I even use it....Just to ensure a good coat.
Would this method work?

Next question.....And this is the DUMBER one of the two. lol   In my web surfing and other forms of learning about deep dish pizza. One thing I keep seeing are whole deep dish pizzas being removed intact from the pan prior to slicing. How is this done without wrecking the pizza?
Is there somekind of trick or toolused to remove the whole pizza or am I just seeing the results of a Removeable pan being used? I did see a TV show on the travel channel this past week about Deep Dish pizza and they just took a knife and pryed the pizza out of the pan in one whole intact piece. (But they were 6" pans)
I was wondering because I've heard NEVER to cut your deep dish pizza in the pan because it will damage the pan, So for fear of looking stupid I figured I'd better ask BEFORE I make the pizza so I don't mangle it or the pan the first time out. lol
Thanks,
Steve


Offline chiguy

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Re: Newbie with a few dumb questions
« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2005, 02:57:28 PM »
 Hi Shystev99, Welcome to the forum. These are not dumb questions at all ,especially for a  person new to the deep dish style. A pan can be seasoned by wiping down with a coat of oil(canola etc..) and baking it in the oven for about 20 min. This seems to be the most popular way. As for a pizza coming out of the pan as a whole. I lightly grease the pan with crisco and  the pizza comes right out using a spatcula. The pizza tends to bake away from the side of the pan and can almost be taken out by hand if the pan was not so hot.
                                         goodluck, chiguy

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Newbie with a few dumb questions
« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2005, 03:33:32 PM »
Steve,

Seasoning a deep-dish pan won't hurt it but if the one you have is one of the newer hard coat anodized pans, it may not be necessary (see the first FAQ at http://www.pizzatools.com/faq.aspx, and look at some of the coated pans elsewhere on the site to see if yours is like the ones shown). If your pan has the new preseasoned coating, then all you have to do is wash the pan in some soap and water before using for the first time. If your pan is of the type requiring seasoning, you won't want to go above about 425-450 degrees F so that the flash point of your oil is not reached and you get a lot of smoke.

As for how to remove the baked pizza from the pan, I will quote you the advice given by Tom Lehmann, a native of the Chicago area and an expert on pizza matters:

Using a deep dish pan gripper, and a long, flexible cake decorators spatula (available from most kitchen supply stores) you should be able to turn the spatula around the edge of the pizza to make sure it isn't sticking to the pan, then with a flip of the wrist, slip the spatula under the pizza and guide it out of the pan all in one motion. It might seem difficult at first, but I do it all the time, it just takes a little practice and a flexible spatula (the spatula is the key).

To see what a pan gripper looks like, go to Reply # 291, second photo, at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,576.msg18395.html#msg18395.

Peter

Offline Shystev99

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Re: Newbie with a few dumb questions
« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2005, 08:00:44 PM »
Thanks for the Welcome and the help.
I bought the pan on ebay this past week on ebay and was debating on buying a gripper to go with it. Instead I decided to buy a pizza cutting roller instead. I figured I could probably live without the gripper but needed the cutter so I grabbed it. Guess I'll have to go back and get a gripper and maybe another pan to.
It is a hard coat type pan, And I think the seller may have said it didn't need to be seasoned but that it wouldn't hurt to go ahead and do it. I also thought it couldn't hurt and I'd just like to do it for nothing more than a learning process for future pans. It's a pizza hut pan, Even says pizza hut and has the logo right on it.

I'll just use the canola oil instead of the shortening to season it. I'll probably have a few more questions as I go. It'll probably be a few weeks before I make my first pizza in it though. Gonna do some more research before I dive in.
Steve

Offline buzz

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Re: Newbie with a few dumb questions
« Reply #4 on: December 11, 2005, 09:51:33 AM »
I use two spatulas, one on each side of the pizza--it lifts out quite easily. Sometimes, when I'm feeling lazy and the other spatula is across the room, I just use one spatula and a knife.

Offline Shystev99

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Re: Newbie with a few dumb questions
« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2005, 01:43:33 AM »
Thanks again for the help again all.
I seasoned my pan today, Probably won't get around to making my first pizza in it until after Christmas. Just alot of other stuff going on until then.
I'm gonna try that 2 spatula trick you suggested buzz. I have plenty of plastic spatulas around.


My one other question is, When I seasoned it today in the end it came out kind of sticky, The coated parts. I did it twice first time with canola oil, then a second coat using shortening which seemed to cover a little better. The canola oil didn't really stick well or cover it all the first time.
But both times the pan was sticky afterwards, is this normal or did I just not do it long enough or hot enough to harden?
I did it for about 20 minutes each time at about 420-425 letting it cool down some in between.
Steve

Offline clembo

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Re: Newbie with a few dumb questions
« Reply #6 on: December 17, 2005, 12:06:58 PM »
Hey Steve,

I'm even newer to the site than you but caught your mention of seasoning a pizza pan like it was cast iron.
I don't own a pizza pan for my deep dish because I cook it in my cast iron skillets.
Forgive me people but I tend to cut the pie while it's in the skillet. It's darn near impossible to damage cast iron.

clembo

Offline Shystev99

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Re: Newbie with a few dumb questions
« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2006, 01:35:52 PM »
I haven't been on the board much since I asked this question a month or so ago, Been having computer problems and just haven't been around. But I saw another thread pointing back to this thread and wanted to tell everyone what I started doing. I've only made a few deep dish pizzas since I posted but developed a kind of odd technique top removing the pie from the deep dish pan.
I started off by taking the plastic spatulas suggested by another user. I use two plastic wide based spatulas. I let the pizza rest for about 5 minutes to kind of cool slightly and let the filling kind of firm slightly.

First picture your pan as a clock, 12 oclock being the top facing farthest from you, 6 oclock being the closest part nearest you.
Then with one spatula i guide it around the edge loosening the entire diameter of the pizza and trying to see if the bottom us loose. Next I stick one of the spatulas between the dough and the inside of the pan and leave it there standing at about the 4 oclock position on a clock. Then I take a second spatula just as wide and do the same thing at about the 8 oclock position. Gently lift the two trying to pry the whole bottom side of the pizza (Bottom being the 6 oclock section facing you
Once you see the crust is high enough out of the pan I take a flat pizza pan, a little larger than your deep dish pan and slip the rim of the flat pan in the gap between the bottom crust and the deep dish pan. Then carefully remove the spatulas and wiggle the flat pan across the edge of the bottom crust. Almost like you would wiggle a flat pizza off a wooden pizza peel. Don't force it or ram it in the deep dish pan, just wiggle it so the pizza slides onto the pan. When the entire flat pan covers the entire bottom crust you just set the whole thing aside to cut.

Now I've only done this 2 or 3 times so I'm not going to say it's a perfect technique. I have had crust break off in a section of the pizza each time and once the bottom crust did stick slightly to the bottom which kind of slaughtered that section of the pizza. But for the most part it seems to work. I've just accepted the fact that it's not going to come out perfect and there will be some minor crust damage.
Steve