Author Topic: My Gas Grill Pizza Oven Project  (Read 11063 times)

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Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: My Gas Grill Pizza Oven Project
« Reply #40 on: December 11, 2012, 01:16:22 PM »

While you can, by heating the top stone on it's own, create a more favorable top to bottom heat ratio, it's important to remember that over time, the bottom stone will get hotter and that advantage will be lost.  Unless you're going to take the bottom stone out of the oven between bakes (something that would be extremely unsafe to do), you'll only get the full advantage of the pre-heated ceiling for the first pizza. If this staggered stone pre-heat does produce a 90 second bake, you'll need to be clear in your advertising that it's for the first pizza only- that is if you truly wish to make sure that "the end-user has a clear understanding of what to expect."
I don't think many people want to cook just one pie per fire up. So I hope you can come up with a better way and show multiple pizzas baked back to back in your video.
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Offline gooddayz

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Re: My Gas Grill Pizza Oven Project
« Reply #41 on: December 13, 2012, 11:11:19 PM »
No You'r not...  ;D. Each device has different features. At the end the consumers will decide. The key is how to reach them... With so many projects that was launched on kickstarter for pizza oven. It may not be right step for me...Thanks for the assisting offer.

Scott, I have not seen anyone make a good NY pie with just a stone...


I agree, they are similar and yet unique in their own ways.  There is plenty of market available for each of us, and ultimately, the consumers will decide as you said.  That is always the key...how to get in front of people.  That's actually why I feel that kickstarter could still be a decent forum for you in regards to getting the idea out there.  Maybe start with a smaller goal, just to test the waters and see what kind of a response you get.  Either way, I wish you the best of luck and the offer still stands on helping with your project.

Ditto on the pizza on one stone...the top doesn't come out right because the heat is concentrated on the base, so you don't get an even bake...oh well, I don't know if we'll ever find or invent the 100% exact replication of a WFO for a grill, however I'm really enjoying the results the The Brick Oven Box is putting out, and can imagine that the MPO, Kettle Pizza, 2Stone, etc all put out some pretty delicious pizzas as well.

At the end of the day, it's about making pizza, enjoying good times with family and friends and getting as close to your "Perfect Pizza" as you can with the resources you have. 

Offline gooddayz

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Re: My Gas Grill Pizza Oven Project
« Reply #42 on: December 13, 2012, 11:19:43 PM »
Scott: That depends on the grill. I just went outside and measured my Weber Genesis surface, and this design would actually cover it perfectly. I won't comment on how well it would work, because I don't know.

Barry

Hi Barry -

I designed this around an older Char-Broil Designer Series 3-burner grill with 40,000 BTU's and have found that it is very similar to the Weber Genesis in terms of size.

I know that not every grill will be the perfect size for the design that I have currently, however, you can not design and market a product to perfectly fit every scenario possible.  You have to design for the largest market segment and then add pieces for the specialized or custom sizes down the line.  The Brick Oven Box will work perfectly on most grills in the market.  There may be a slight difference in the exact performance for extremely large grill, however, it will still work very well.  Also, we already have a larger box/hood combo designed for the extremely large grills.  We need to test the market for the concept first and then we'll work on bringing the larger size to market.
« Last Edit: December 13, 2012, 11:23:18 PM by gooddayz »

Offline gooddayz

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Re: My Gas Grill Pizza Oven Project
« Reply #43 on: December 14, 2012, 01:35:30 AM »
Pete, there are countless ways to achieve NY style baking times on a grill.  With all the work you've done on your own setup, you should be acutely aware of this.  The market has the 2stone, the Mighty Pizza Oven, the KettlePizza insert and a host of other simple DIY approaches. A $60 fibrament grill stone on a typical gas grill can hit NY bake times.  NY on a grill is child's play. The market is completely oversaturated.

What does NOT exist, though, is a way to make Neapolitan pizza on a grill.  This is the fountain of youth, cold fusion, bigfoot and unicorns wrapped up in one- to match the results of a multi-thousand dollar wood fired oven in a multi-hundred dollar grill setup. This is what probably at least 300 people have tried and failed to achieve in the LBE thread.  This claim is a very big deal and shouldn't be dismissed because the majority of the public may not know what Neapolitan pizza is.

I assure you, if any person can ever invent a device to make Neapolitan pizza on a grill, it will garner them a great deal of money, due to the fact that it can produce something that no other inexpensive device can.

Sorry, Tim, but x number of BTUs aren't going to guarantee 90 second bakes.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4753.0.html

I've read through this incredibly long (92 page) thread at least 3 times in the last year.  These are pretty much all people working with 90K to 185K BTU burners. Out of at least 300 attempts, only 2 members broke the 2 minute mark.  And your design, without a skirt covering the grill area outside the device, doesn't even focus every precious BTU up and through your baking area.

If an LBE with two cordierite stones can't guarantee 90 seconds with 90K BTUs, that pretty much means that no BTU number is the magic number to guarantee that bake time.

While you can, by heating the top stone on it's own, create a more favorable top to bottom heat ratio, it's important to remember that over time, the bottom stone will get hotter and that advantage will be lost.  Unless you're going to take the bottom stone out of the oven between bakes (something that would be extremely unsafe to do), you'll only get the full advantage of the pre-heated ceiling for the first pizza. If this staggered stone pre-heat does produce a 90 second bake, you'll need to be clear in your advertising that it's for the first pizza only- that is if you truly wish to make sure that "the end-user has a clear understanding of what to expect."

I don't think many people want to cook just one pie per fire up. So I hope you can come up with a better way and show multiple pizzas baked back to back in your video.

I have to agree, there is nothing that really compares to a perfectly constructed wood-fired brick oven with an expertly tended fire; it is in a league of its own.  However, the 2Stone appears to put out some pretty amazing pizzas, the MPO looks like it produces some excellent results, the Kettle Grill appears to make for some good eats, and The Brick Oven Box definitely puts out some awesome pizzas.  Some pizzas cook in around 90 seconds, some pizzas cook in around 2 to 3 minutes and some cook in 3 to 6 minutes.  It ultimately comes down to the type of dough used, style of pizzas made, exact grill setup & specs, external factors (climate, etc), tending of the pizza, and the management of the heat, etc.  It's similar to how the performance of a WFO comes down to its construction, design, quality of the components used, type of wood used to fire it, external factors (climate, etc.), management of the fire iteself, placement of the pizzas, etc.

I am not claiming that The Brick Oven Box is as good as a perfectly managed WFO; I am claiming that it can bake Neapolitan (would Neo-Neapolitan be a more acceptable term?) style pizzas in around 90 seconds, with excellent results.  I'm also not saying that I have the "the fountain of youth, cold fusion, bigfoot and unicorns wrapped up in one" as you say it would be.  I'm saying that it's a great product that puts out excellent quality pizzas for an extremely reasonable price, for those that are not fortunate enough to have access to a WFO or deck pizza oven, or those that do not want to always go through the work of firing their WFO.

The statement of preheating the top is simply a suggestion for how to achieve the hotter top of the box quickly.  True, the top and bottom of the box can level off over time, however, through managing the flames, you can balance the heat.  I have seen great results through experimenting with different "firing" strategies, and am certain that there are others that will find better strategies than I have after working with The Brick Oven Box.  

I have been extremely busy this week but I am trying to find the time to fire some demos to post as we discussed; hopefully by this weekend.

Again, thank you all for the feedback and I look forward to getting more once I have a chance to post the pics and videos.

Have a good night!

Happy Pizza Making!

Tim
« Last Edit: December 14, 2012, 01:37:46 AM by gooddayz »

Offline bfguilford

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Re: My Gas Grill Pizza Oven Project
« Reply #44 on: December 14, 2012, 09:34:42 AM »
Hi Barry -

I designed this around an older Char-Broil Designer Series 3-burner grill with 40,000 BTU's and have found that it is very similar to the Weber Genesis in terms of size.

I know that not every grill will be the perfect size for the design that I have currently, however, you can not design and market a product to perfectly fit every scenario possible.  You have to design for the largest market segment and then add pieces for the specialized or custom sizes down the line.  The Brick Oven Box will work perfectly on most grills in the market.  There may be a slight difference in the exact performance for extremely large grill, however, it will still work very well.  Also, we already have a larger box/hood combo designed for the extremely large grills.  We need to test the market for the concept first and then we'll work on bringing the larger size to market.

Tim:

I wasn't suggesting that you design and market a product to perfectly fit every possible grill configuration (although perhaps incorporating some type of expandable skirt around the box might help). I was recognizing that you may have designed it to fit a fairly popular grill size. One thing I'm wondering about is whether the burner configuration might have an impact on the effectiveness of the design. I think your grill has burners that run "north-south" which means that the box likely will do a reasonably effective job of directing the heat from the outside burners to the top stone, which, in combination with turning off the middle burner, is what will help drive the top-bottom browning balance. My Genesis has 3 burners that run "east-west" and I'd be concerned that the flow of heat would be less (and maybe much less) effective. Any thoughts on that... do you have any friend with a grill with that type of burner configuration that you could test on?

Barry
« Last Edit: December 14, 2012, 09:40:30 AM by bfguilford »
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Offline mfcura

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Re: My Gas Grill Pizza Oven Project
« Reply #45 on: March 13, 2013, 09:29:47 AM »
Anyone hear of an update to this Kickstarter Project?  There haven't been any updates or comments from the developer for about 6 weeks...that's pretty weak!

Offline bruce9432

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Re: My Gas Grill Pizza Oven Project
« Reply #46 on: March 31, 2013, 05:47:20 PM »
I would like to know the physics/chemistry behind getting an extra 400 degrees from a 600 degree gas flame?

Offline kevinbrown22

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Re: My Gas Grill Pizza Oven Project
« Reply #47 on: May 18, 2013, 12:37:11 AM »
I believe propane burns about 3600F in normal air. so really not a problem.
Science, better than making stuff up since well forever.


 

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