Author Topic: Need expert help  (Read 8608 times)

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Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Need expert help
« Reply #100 on: January 21, 2013, 10:15:46 PM »
Not true.  I make a cultured mozz that I can make as dry as I want.  Grande is about the only cheese that comes close to mine.  I use a non-homogenized milk that's mostly from Jersey's so it's got a high butterfat content.
That's great jkb. Do you add a culture before forming the curd and what is your drying technique to achieve the "aged" block with which makes the cheese able to be shreded ?  Link to your milk please? Thanks!

Bob
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Online scott123

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Re: Need expert help
« Reply #101 on: January 21, 2013, 10:34:25 PM »
Not true.  I make a cultured mozz that I can make as dry as I want.  Grande is about the only cheese that comes close to mine.  I use a non-homogenized milk that's mostly from Jersey's so it's got a high butterfat content.

Okay, you've got my attention ;D

I've searched through probably hundreds of online mozzarella recipes and I've never come across any instructions for aging. Is this your own recipe? Is it posted anywhere?

As Bob asked, what's your drying technique?

If you can produce something Grande-ish at home that would be pretty groundbreaking, imo. Do you have any photos?

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Need expert help
« Reply #102 on: January 21, 2013, 10:41:18 PM »
Do you have any photos?
Of the cheese melted on a pizza pie..... ;)    Thanks jkb!
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Online scott123

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Re: Need expert help
« Reply #103 on: January 21, 2013, 11:10:43 PM »
Of the cheese melted on a pizza pie..... ;)    Thanks jkb!

Actually with a firm paper towel pressing and a drizzle of oil, non aged fior di latte can end up looked pretty aged when melted.  I'm not against seeing the finished pizza, but I'm dying to see a photo of the cheese itself.

Offline jkb

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Re: Need expert help
« Reply #104 on: January 21, 2013, 11:29:52 PM »
Okay, you've got my attention ;D

I've searched through probably hundreds of online mozzarella recipes and I've never come across any instructions for aging. Is this your own recipe? Is it posted anywhere?

As Bob asked, what's your drying technique?

If you can produce something Grande-ish at home that would be pretty groundbreaking, imo. Do you have any photos?

I adapted the recipe from Home Cheese Making by Ricki Carroll.  I use lipase, direct set thermophillic, and vegetable rennet (all from Leener's).  Everything procedes based on pH (I do a two point calibration on my meter with buffer solutions before I start.  The key to low moisture is in the stretching - you need to get the whey out.  I typically add salt before the final stretch.  I blot the ball dry and wrap it in plastic.  It's good after a couple of days in the fridge.  The only tricky part is adjusting and maintaining throughout the ~5 hr process.  No photos.  I'm two years into a remodel and my wife would kill me if I spent 5 hours making a pound of cheese right now.  I'll have to settle for Grande for the time-being.

Offline jkb

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Re: Need expert help
« Reply #105 on: January 22, 2013, 12:16:21 AM »

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Need expert help
« Reply #106 on: January 22, 2013, 12:34:42 AM »
http://www.battenkillcreamery.com/
Thanks for the link jkb...is this raw milk or do they pasteurize it? You mention 5hrs to produce 1lb of cheese.....have you any experience in producing larger batches with your method but stopping short after the curd development stage and freezing that(the curd) for later final processing? Thanks!
Bob
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Offline jkb

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Re: Need expert help
« Reply #107 on: January 22, 2013, 12:41:26 AM »
Thanks for the link jkb...is this raw milk or do they pasteurize it? You mention 5hrs to produce 1lb of cheese.....have you any experience in producing larger batches with your method but stopping short after the curd development stage and freezing that(the curd) for later final processing? Thanks!
Bob

It is pasteurized.  There's a farm down the road from me that sells raw milk.  I plan to use it next time I make cheese.  I've never made more than a one gallon batch.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Need expert help
« Reply #108 on: January 22, 2013, 12:44:15 AM »
It is pasteurized.  There's a farm down the road from me that sells raw milk.  I plan to use it next time I make cheese.  I've never made more than a one gallon batch.
Thanks, have you any experience with trying the combination of powdered milk and cream?
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Online scott123

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Re: Need expert help
« Reply #109 on: January 22, 2013, 09:19:42 AM »
I adapted the recipe from Home Cheese Making by Ricki Carroll.  I use lipase, direct set thermophillic, and vegetable rennet (all from Leener's).  Everything procedes based on pH (I do a two point calibration on my meter with buffer solutions before I start.  The key to low moisture is in the stretching - you need to get the whey out.  I typically add salt before the final stretch.  I blot the ball dry and wrap it in plastic.  It's good after a couple of days in the fridge.  The only tricky part is adjusting and maintaining throughout the ~5 hr process.  No photos.  I'm two years into a remodel and my wife would kill me if I spent 5 hours making a pound of cheese right now.  I'll have to settle for Grande for the time-being.

JKB, could you describe your cheese?  Does it have a yellow-ish tint?  Do plain pies always oil off? Does it rarely develop brown specs or burn?  When you grate it, does it leave a clean relatively film free grater?


Offline jkb

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Re: Need expert help
« Reply #110 on: January 22, 2013, 11:48:55 AM »
JKB, could you describe your cheese?  Does it have a yellow-ish tint?  Do plain pies always oil off? Does it rarely develop brown specs or burn?  When you grate it, does it leave a clean relatively film free grater?

It's like Grande in every respect, maybe a little firmer and more flavorful.

Online scott123

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Re: Need expert help
« Reply #111 on: January 22, 2013, 12:04:57 PM »
JKB, I am by no means an expert on cheese making, but, from the research that I've done, it seems like Grande is a lot more complicated than the cheese you're making

http://www.google.com/patents/US4085228

Now, I'm 90% certain that this is how Grande is made, but there's no way of confirming it.  Until I learn more, which, considering how secretive Grande is, isn't likely, I'll give you the benefit of the doubt, but I'd really appreciate some photos when you get a chance.

Offline Pizzaboyo

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Re: Need expert help
« Reply #112 on: January 28, 2013, 05:21:45 PM »
Sounds good PB.You might like to try a whole milk aged(partially dried) mozz like traditionally used on NY type pizza's.

This is the only "block" mozz I can find guys,http://www.ocado.com/webshop/product/Arla-Discover-Mozzarella-Cheese/14677011
An Irishman is never drunk as long as he can hold onto one blade of grass and not fall off the face of the earth.

Online scott123

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Re: Need expert help
« Reply #113 on: January 28, 2013, 05:34:10 PM »
PB, I'm not liking the photo (brown spots and stringy), the 'soft cheese' reference in the description has me a little concerned and the comment about it being difficult to grate is another warning sign. Good aged mozz should grate like a mild young cheddar.

If that's all you have, the yellow tinge seems to point to some aging, so it might be better than 'fresh' mozz/fior di latte, so I'd give it a shot, but I'd still keep looking.

I know pizza isn't huge the Ireland, but you should still be able to walk into a supermarket and find at least one brand of brick mozzarella, right?


Offline Pizzaboyo

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Re: Need expert help
« Reply #114 on: January 28, 2013, 05:55:31 PM »
Spot on Scott.It's like rubber  :-[ I put it in the freezer to make grating easier, tasted very bland and chewy. I'll have a scout round when I get a chance,surely there must be brick mozz somewhere in this land. As for your suggestion on going with the organic flour! CHEERS I had my best pizza ever on Friday night (and no batteries in the bloody camera). Soft,light,crispy,tasty. It made me realize what I should of been making all along (big up to CB for the passata suggestion too  ;)) I'm making a dough tomorrow for Friday night so hope to replicate it.
An Irishman is never drunk as long as he can hold onto one blade of grass and not fall off the face of the earth.

Online scott123

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Re: Need expert help
« Reply #115 on: January 28, 2013, 06:04:08 PM »
Sounds great, PB, I'm glad the organic's working out for you.

Rubbery, believe it or not, may not be all that bad for the cheese. My concern was that the cheese would be too soft to grate easily, not too hard. Soft cheese sticks to the grater and makes a bit of a mess when grating, while proper aged mozz slides through the grate holes cleanly. It's the sticky quality that makes it hard to grate. Is the cheese soft and sticky or rubbery?

Btw, no mozz, either good or bad, is easy to grate. Even the best mozz will take some elbow grease to grate.

Offline Pizzaboyo

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Re: Need expert help
« Reply #116 on: January 28, 2013, 06:17:39 PM »
the cheese is soft but grates o.k.ish I just find its cleaner on the grater when its chilled.
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Online scott123

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Re: Need expert help
« Reply #117 on: January 28, 2013, 07:09:28 PM »
Good mozz should grate cleanly at room temp :( At least the really good stuff does.

It could still be good.  Let's see how it does on your next batch of pies.


Offline Pizzaboyo

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Re: Need expert help
« Reply #118 on: February 18, 2013, 11:32:24 AM »
Sounds great, PB, I'm glad the organic's working out for you.

Rubbery, believe it or not, may not be all that bad for the cheese. My concern was that the cheese would be too soft to grate easily, not too hard. Soft cheese sticks to the grater and makes a bit of a mess when grating, while proper aged mozz slides through the grate holes cleanly. It's the sticky quality that makes it hard to grate. Is the cheese soft and sticky or rubbery?

Btw, no mozz, either good or bad, is easy to grate. Even the best mozz will take some elbow grease to grate.
Hi Scott,sorry about the delay in replying. I got block mozzarella from my local supermarket but didn't get the name just a piece off the block. It seems to of done the job (for me anyway ;D) It grated cleanly even though it did take the elbow grease you spoke of but it melted well in a 4min bake and was nice and stringy the way I like it. Here's a pic of my latest using your organic formula + CB's sauce topped with sauteed mushroom & shallot with garlic and a squirt of lemon. Next project is a nice spicy homemade sausage for my topping. :chef:
An Irishman is never drunk as long as he can hold onto one blade of grass and not fall off the face of the earth.