Author Topic: Forno bravo napolino  (Read 7000 times)

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Offline csafranek

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Forno bravo napolino
« on: December 09, 2012, 05:07:56 PM »
I keep finding myself back to this oven. The larger napolino70.


Offline csafranek

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Re: Forno bravo napolino
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2012, 05:08:39 PM »
Has ANYONE purchased this or seen it in person yet?

Offline shuboyje

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Re: Forno bravo napolino
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2012, 05:55:33 PM »
I haven't run across anyone with one, but can tell you it is the same oven as all their 70 size ovens in different clothes.  You will find lots if people here with that oven, just not the tiled enclosure.
-Jeff

Offline csafranek

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Re: Forno bravo napolino
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2012, 10:11:18 PM »
There has to be SOME differences I would think. I know they are very similar but the way the smoke goes out the top and possible retained more heat? I don't know. I really like the look of it. I wonder how the tile would hold up to the outside climates?

Offline shuboyje

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Re: Forno bravo napolino
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2012, 10:24:57 PM »
Look up the Giordano70 kit.  All the 70 series ovens use that core, they simply have different enclosures. 

A proper Neapolitan vent will not retain more heat, it will actually lead to less heat retention due to a largely uninsulated portion of the oven, especially on an oven that small.  Trust me, I have built and owned ovens with and without them.  That said I highly doubt fornobravo has used an actual neapolitan vent and instead I am sure they have simply routed stainless pipe back over the oven and to the center with a couple elbows to give the LOOK of a neapolitan vent but not the function of one.  Few people in this world even understand how they function.
-Jeff

Offline csafranek

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Re: Forno bravo napolino
« Reply #5 on: December 09, 2012, 10:27:07 PM »
So what do you think of the p70 by forno?

Offline shuboyje

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Re: Forno bravo napolino
« Reply #6 on: December 09, 2012, 10:48:48 PM »
I have no first hand experience with it, but the 60 and 70 ovens by fornobravo are among the most popular ovens on the market.  Many people use them with great results, but many do end up wanting something larger once they cook in them for a while.  I personally experienced that with my first oven, which was 30" internal diameter.  I demolished it and built a 42" oven to replace it.
-Jeff

Offline csafranek

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Re: Forno bravo napolino
« Reply #7 on: December 09, 2012, 10:52:13 PM »
So did you build yours from scratch? What made you want a bigger one? When your doing 90 second pizzas why would you need to do more than two at a time? I understand if you bake more like turkeys and such.

Offline shuboyje

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Re: Forno bravo napolino
« Reply #8 on: December 09, 2012, 11:06:43 PM »
Yes, I build from scratch from brick. 

I highly doubt you will do two at once in an oven under 36",  I know in their advertising they will tell you otherwise but in a small oven the fire will take up a huge amount of space if you want to cook pizza in less then 90 seconds.  Thats the smaller issue though.  The bigger issue is the proximity of the pizza to the fire in a smaller oven.  Your pizza is right on top of the coal bed, and although you can cook great pizza that way you really move into a different league once you can move the pizza further away from the coals and utilize the heated mass more to achieve an even bake.  I cooked turkey no problem in my 30" oven, it was pizza that drove me to go bigger and I rarely cook more then one at a time. 
-Jeff

Offline csafranek

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Re: Forno bravo napolino
« Reply #9 on: December 09, 2012, 11:11:07 PM »
Thank you for all your comments. May I ask what it cost you to build your latest oven?


Offline Free Mr. Tony

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Re: Forno bravo napolino
« Reply #10 on: May 14, 2013, 11:27:11 PM »
Still no one with this oven?  I am considering one for my deck, and like the looks

Offline cuznvin

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Re: Forno bravo napolino
« Reply #11 on: June 28, 2013, 02:42:22 PM »
Look up the Giordano70 kit.  All the 70 series ovens use that core, they simply have different enclosures. 

A proper Neapolitan vent will not retain more heat, it will actually lead to less heat retention due to a largely uninsulated portion of the oven, especially on an oven that small.  Trust me, I have built and owned ovens with and without them.  That said I highly doubt fornobravo has used an actual neapolitan vent and instead I am sure they have simply routed stainless pipe back over the oven and to the center with a couple elbows to give the LOOK of a neapolitan vent but not the function of one.  Few people in this world even understand how they function.

If you look at the specs the vent is in the middle. It draws exhaust from the front and over the dome

http://www.fornobravo.com/PDF/napolino_datasheet.pdf

Offline shuboyje

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Re: Forno bravo napolino
« Reply #12 on: June 28, 2013, 06:59:50 PM »
Thats pretty obvious, but that is not what my comment was about.  A "functional" Neapolitan vent has no insulation between the vent and the oven.  The heat from the dome is said to heat the air in the vent and thus increase draw.  I personally feel this is all smoke, mirrors, and a result of results being credited to the wrong source, but I could talk about that for a long time(and have).  Knowing their mindset pretty well I would bet there is insulation between the dome and vent on the Forno Bravo oven. 
-Jeff

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Forno bravo napolino
« Reply #13 on: June 28, 2013, 07:47:44 PM »
And I agree with him on this point.  That is the major design flaw to a traditional Neapolitan oven, although they claim it is a feature against all scientific logic.

Offline txtanner

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Re: Forno bravo napolino
« Reply #14 on: August 04, 2013, 02:03:08 PM »
I totally agree with you that the logic makes no sense to me either but it just dawned on me as  I'm typing that the Italians are  renowned for their marketing skills.The have an ability to sell the mystic and old world"romance" of a product better than anyone.We hear  numbers and percentages about the fuel savings of this type of vent but compared to what?An open fire.Where does this data come from.I can only assume they are comparing the current recirculating vent to the same basic oven with the dome insulated but with the vent placed at the center of the dome.In this context the argument that the recirculating vent makes perfect sense.That being said I see it as an improvement but not the end all be all.Let me clarify I mean this with no disrespect to the makers of these ovens or the people who market them as they are hard working people just trying to make a living.God know Americans will try to sell popsicles to Eskimos and have taken marketing "math"to an art form.An example DOWNY THE QUICKER PICKER UPPER PICKS UP 33% MORE THAN THE LEADING BRAND.Whos the leading"brand"and what criteria is "leading"based on.Turns out there comparing themselves to a generic private label producer in china thats the leading brand because they sell 30 billions rolls a year .The China roll is 33% thinner so yea it picks up 33% less but it costs 50 cents a roll compared to Downys $ 1.50 a roll.Yeah you just payed twice as much for the same amount of paper but hey the lady on the commercial was really hot and looked like she was telling the truth.She was telling the truth and told no lies.It was enough information to get you to buy it just was not the info you needed to decide which product was a better value.Obviously those beautiful ovens made in Italy produce lots of great pizza day in and day out year after year but I think I see a few areas for improvement.Does anyone know when or how long ago the recirculated vent became adopted or accepted as "a better mouse trap".When ever it was I imagine there were a lot of disturbed graves from ancestral generations of oven masters turning oven in their graves.Could it be that they themselves have already proven the point that the way  it was done and the materials(hell we got volcanos here too we just  don't have 3 million people living on them,maybe Mt Rainier but Seattle is 50 miles away) they used 150 years ago can be improved.I think if you asked Stefano Ferrara himself he would say of course.I bet you all the Italian oven builders are hardworking blue collar kinda guys,It's the people who purchase their products and use them in their restaurants and the people that write about those restaurants that heap those mystical praises on them.They are proud of their purchases and let it be know you have to come to experience it at their place.We should all aspire to that.And food writers get paid to write about food and they're passionate about it and good at.They can make a glass of tea sound so good you go get in your car and drive cross country just to get a glass.I'm rambalin now but always always always find out whats in it and who made it before you drink the coolaide .To the OP I believe the way the napolina70 works is the interior dome is not insulated from the vent in the arch at the door to the flue pipe in the center but this area is covered by a outer dome that is insulated.I guess if you wanna retain heat to bake bread you just put the door on(it seals the oven from the vent in the arch) like usual and plug the hole in the arch that feeds the flue so you don't have air passing through sucking heat out of the inner dome.

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Forno bravo napolino
« Reply #15 on: August 04, 2013, 06:43:52 PM »
Paragraphs are your friend.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Forno bravo napolino
« Reply #16 on: August 04, 2013, 06:49:52 PM »
Knowing their mindset pretty well I would bet there is insulation between the dome and vent on the Forno Bravo oven.

If you're right, then the datasheet in the link above your post is a blatant lie as it makes the exact opposite claim. I don't think they have done anything in the past that would lead me to believe they are dishonest.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Forno bravo napolino
« Reply #17 on: August 04, 2013, 07:12:51 PM »
Paragraphs are your friend.

So are spaces after periods.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Forno bravo napolino
« Reply #18 on: August 04, 2013, 07:38:39 PM »
And not one but 2 spaces.....

Offline shuboyje

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Re: Forno bravo napolino
« Reply #19 on: August 04, 2013, 08:46:21 PM »
Don't know how I missed that.  I wonder if that PDF has been updated since I made my post a few months back, I don't remember ever seeing that diagram, but it is very clear there is no insulation.

If you're right, then the datasheet in the link above your post is a blatant lie as it makes the exact opposite claim. I don't think they have done anything in the past that would lead me to believe they are dishonest.
-Jeff


 

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