Author Topic: Mad Stretching Skills  (Read 7401 times)

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Offline Jackie Tran

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Re: Mad Stretching Skills
« Reply #20 on: January 10, 2013, 01:41:45 PM »
Hey buddy. How are you?

Why dont you think I will get any takers? I just wanted a bit of light hearted fun.

Paul it's a wonderful idea.  I love challenges.  I posted several and never got any responders except you.  I hope folks will play along but generally speaking....folks dont want to work for things but would rather you just post up ur formula and methods.  :-D


Offline Paul-Brighton

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Re: Mad Stretching Skills
« Reply #21 on: January 11, 2013, 05:16:29 PM »
Scott123 :-)


I could stretch this dough forever it feels like.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2013, 01:03:35 PM by Steve »

Offline Chaze215

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Re: Mad Stretching Skills
« Reply #22 on: January 11, 2013, 07:37:27 PM »
Looks great! Congrats on the new leg, but I noticed you didnt have it on in the video. I am a PT so I know what you have been through to get walking again. Hope all is well with the prosthesis.

Chaz
Chaz

Offline jeff v

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Re: Mad Stretching Skills
« Reply #23 on: January 11, 2013, 07:52:35 PM »
Quote from: Paul-Brighton link=topic=22669.msg231436#msg231436  date=1357942589
Video.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WM_W4hUpoeI&feature=youtube_gdata_player

I could stretch this dough forever it feels like.

Long distance pizza consultation! You guys did good!

I'm not real familiar w ny style but will take a stab-

I'm guessing bromated flour was a prerequisite knowing Scott.:-D  Can you get it there?
60-62% hydration
Scott likes a three day dough but maybe you only use 1-2 for commercial operation?
TF of .07 - .08

Am I close?

Online scott123

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Re: Mad Stretching Skills
« Reply #24 on: January 11, 2013, 08:43:04 PM »
I'm guessing bromated flour was a prerequisite knowing Scott.:-D


Actually...

The Potassium Bromate (Prohibition as a Flour Improver) Regulations 1990

I can't comment on anything else, but I'm glad to see someone participating in the contest.

Offline jeff v

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Re: Mad Stretching Skills
« Reply #25 on: January 11, 2013, 10:15:03 PM »
Maybe one of the Pendleton products then...

Offline shuboyje

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Re: Mad Stretching Skills
« Reply #26 on: January 11, 2013, 10:34:37 PM »
ok, here is my stab...

100% 12.5% protein bread flour
60% hydration
2% salt
1% yeast
0.075 TF

Lightly mixed, balled and cold fermented 48 hours.  Brought to room temperature a couple hours prior to use.
-Jeff

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Mad Stretching Skills
« Reply #27 on: January 12, 2013, 12:24:51 PM »
How about I take guesses about my dough recipe/mixing/fermenting protocol and flour type and the one that I feel is closest I will send a prize too? I can then reveal all the details about what I do.


Paul,

For fun on this rainy Saturday morning in Texas, I thought that I would take a stab at this. However, I decided to take a different tack. Rather than trying to look into your mind, and rather than going back and rereading the PM exchanges we have had in the past, I decided instead to try to look into Scott's mind ;D.  On that basis, here are some of the preliminaries:

Flour: I believe that you are using a medium-strength flour or flour blend with a protein content of about 12.5-13%. It would be unbromated (because of UK/EU laws) and preferably malted (or malted separately). Two of the major millers in the UK are Hovis and Allinson. The Hovis brand flours that I believe are available at the foodservice level are shown at http://www.rankhovis.co.uk/rank-hovis-originals-range/. I did not spend time trying to get the specs on those flours, but I would imagine that the particular brand with about 12.5-13% protein level would be the one I would pick for your case. On the Hovis retail side, the flour that would appear to satisfy the protein level I mentioned would be the Premium White Bread Flour at http://www.hovisbakery.co.uk/our-range/flour-mixes/premium-white-bread-flour. I could not find a counterpart to that flour at Allinson, but a blend of their Strong White Bread Flour (http://www.allinsonflour.co.uk/products/strong-white-bread-flour.html) and their Premium White Very Strong Bread Flour (http://www.allinsonflour.co.uk/products/premium-white-very-strong-bread-flour.html), in the proper proportions, should also be a workable blend with the desired protein content. It may well be that Allinson already offers a flour at the foodservice level that is at the desired protein level but I did not see it at their website. I understand that Hovis now uses grains from the UK only, whereas Allinson will shop the world for the best grains, so that might be a distinction that you take into account in your decision making process. You would want the flour that produces the best results for your operation.

Yeast: I would go with an instant dry yeast (IDY) or an equivalent amount of fresh yeast. For IDY, the Allinson Easy Bake Yeast might be a logical choice (http://www.allinsonflour.co.uk/products/easy-bake-yeast.html).

Dough Mix: Enough to bring all of the ingredients together with some gluten formation and with a "cottage cheese" appearance but relying mainly on biochemical gluten development.

Fermentation Protocol: Cold fermentation with a duration of about 2 days, possibly 3.

Dough Tempering: About 1 1/2-2 hours (depending on the time of year) at room temperature.

Thickness Factor: About 0.075

For a guess on the dough formulation, I would go with this:

100%, Flour or Flour Blend (with the characteristics as noted above)
62%, Water
0.375%, IDY (or an equivalent amount of fresh yeast)
Salt, 1.75%
Oil, 2% (olive or canola or a blend)
Sugar, 1-2% (particularly if the cold fermentation exceeds about 2 days)


Peter

Offline jeff v

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Re: Mad Stretching Skills
« Reply #28 on: January 12, 2013, 12:40:08 PM »
I don't even think that qualifies as a guess!  :-D

Offline norma427

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Re: Mad Stretching Skills
« Reply #29 on: January 12, 2013, 01:48:07 PM »
I will take a stab at guessing.  I really liked the Manitoba flour Paul sent me, so I will guess that Manitoba flour is used in his dough.  I donít really recall, but think the Manitoba flour is around 13.0% protein, give or take a little, might be nearer 14.0% because it did mix well for me.  

I would also guess about 63-64% hydration, 1.95% salt (maybe sea salt), and maybe about .40% IDY, 1.50% oil, TF about 0.08, for a 2 or 3 day cold ferment.  

Mix until dough is a little more than the cottage cheese appearance, let dough balls warm up about 2 hrs. depending on the temp.

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!


Offline Paul-Brighton

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Re: Mad Stretching Skills
« Reply #30 on: January 12, 2013, 07:55:11 PM »
Guys...........great guesses!  
« Last Edit: January 12, 2013, 07:58:13 PM by Paul-Brighton »

Online scott123

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Re: Mad Stretching Skills
« Reply #31 on: January 12, 2013, 09:18:07 PM »
...I decided instead to try to look into Scott's mind ;D

Peter, while you were peering around in there, did you happen across any memories from the early 90s?  I'm missing a few spots  ;D What can I say, it was a festive time  ;D

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Mad Stretching Skills
« Reply #32 on: January 12, 2013, 10:51:38 PM »
Peter, while you were peering around in there, did you happen across any memories from the early 90s?  I'm missing a few spots  ;D What can I say, it was a festive time  ;D
Jus be glad he made it outta there in one piece.... >:D
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

enter8

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Re: Mad Stretching Skills
« Reply #33 on: January 12, 2013, 11:16:53 PM »
Quote
I understand that Hovis now uses grains from the UK only, whereas Allinson will shop the world for the best grains, so that might be a distinction that you take into account in your decision making process. You would want the flour that produces the best results for your operation.

No chance. With the terrible harvests in the UK recently, Hovis (owned by Premier Foods) is importing wheat from Canada, Kazakhstan etc. just like every other industrial commercial mill in the UK. It did tout all-uk-sourced-grain circa 2009/2010 for its baked goods but I don't think that translates to current Hovis flour products.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Mad Stretching Skills
« Reply #34 on: January 13, 2013, 12:13:53 AM »
No chance. With the terrible harvests in the UK recently, Hovis (owned by Premier Foods) is importing wheat from Canada, Kazakhstan etc. just like every other industrial commercial mill in the UK. It did tout all-uk-sourced-grain circa 2009/2010 for its baked goods but I don't think that translates to current Hovis flour products.



Mal,

What you say did cross my mind but the 100% British wheat statement came from the Hovis website at http://www.hovisbakery.co.uk/our-range/flour-mixes, which covers both baked goods and flours.

Peter

enter8

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Re: Mad Stretching Skills
« Reply #35 on: January 13, 2013, 12:16:39 AM »
Mal,

What you say did cross my mind but the 100% British wheat statement came from the Hovis website at http://www.hovisbakery.co.uk/our-range/flour-mixes, which covers both baked goods and flours.

Peter


http://www.hovisbakery.co.uk/faq
Quote
Hovis and 100% British Wheat

1. Why isnít Hovis made from 100% British wheat anymore?
As a result of the worst UK harvest in over 35 years*, it is not currently possible to get sufficient supplies of the right quality wheat to meet all our needs. To ensure that we continue to make quality Hovis bread that tastes as good as it has always been, we have no choice but to supplement our supplies of British wheat from further afield.


Also here:

http://www.fwi.co.uk/Articles/10/01/2013/137102/Hovis-abandons-British-wheat-pledge.htm

Quote
Hovis has abandoned its 100% British wheat pledge after the UK's poor harvest left the company with "no choice" but to import from the EU.
The bread brand said around a third of the wheat used in Hovis bread will be imported from the EU but it will still use around 660,000t of British wheat.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2013, 08:07:57 AM by enter8 »

enter8

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Re: Mad Stretching Skills
« Reply #36 on: January 13, 2013, 12:22:56 AM »
FWIW, the "hovis bakery" website only covers the domestic/home-baking flour products.

The professional/commercial range is from Rank Hovis (mills): http://www.rankhovis.co.uk/flours/

It's still part of the Premier Foods empire but operates separately.
« Last Edit: January 13, 2013, 12:25:23 AM by enter8 »

enter8

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Re: Mad Stretching Skills
« Reply #37 on: January 13, 2013, 12:37:47 AM »
I'm guessing Paul is using Manitoba flour from Marriages Millers (who, btw, also supply Waitrose with their "Very Strong Canadian" white flour).

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Mad Stretching Skills
« Reply #38 on: January 13, 2013, 07:13:07 AM »
Peter, while you were peering around in there, did you happen across any memories from the early 90s?  I'm missing a few spots  ;D What can I say, it was a festive time  ;D

 :-D :-D

Peter

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Mad Stretching Skills
« Reply #39 on: January 13, 2013, 09:25:46 AM »
I'm guessing Paul is using Manitoba flour from Marriages Millers (who, btw, also supply Waitrose with their "Very Strong Canadian" white flour).


Mal,

When I was researching UK flours beyond the millers that I was aware of from previous research, that is, Hovis and Allinson's, I did come across Marriage's. However, when I looked at the 16kg sacks, at http://flour.co.uk/buy-our-flour/16kg-sacks, I did not see any nutrition information or specs. And the white flours seemed to be organic flours. However, I did see that they carried a fairly wide range of flours for the retail market, at http://flour.co.uk/buy-our-flour/1-5kg-bags. But, again, I saw no nutrition information or specs. Usually, in cases like this, I go to retailers like Sainsbury, Tesco and Waitrose where I can often find the nutrition information and specs. But I did not do so this time since I did not see the large bags of non-organic white flours at Marriage's. However, this morning, out of curiosity, I took a look at the Waitrose Very Strong Canadian White Flour and saw that the protein content is given as 15 grams per 100 grams of the flour, at http://www.waitrose.com/shop/ProductView-10317-10001-2744-Waitrose+very+strong+Canadian+white+flour (I clicked on Nutrition). However, it is possible that the protein content is based on a 0% or "dry matter" basis, as is discussed for example in the King Arthur article on flour that I retrieved from the Wayback Machine at http://web.archive.org/web/20060208023504/http://www.kingarthurflour.com/stuff/contentmgr/files/15ec5c94af1251cdac2d7a25848f0e27/miscdocs/Flour%20Guide.pdf. So, the protein content may have a different value in the U.S., which is reported on a 14% moisture basis.

I also did not see anything at Waitrose or elsewhere to tell me whether the Marriage flours are malted. Maybe that is information that is not routinely given in the UK as it is in the U.S.

Peter


 

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