Author Topic: Second attempt... much better all around.  (Read 5202 times)

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Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Different baking techniques...
« Reply #20 on: January 04, 2013, 10:06:05 PM »
Oh really?
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"


Offline mistachy

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Re: Different baking techniques...
« Reply #21 on: January 05, 2013, 07:00:25 AM »
what are your thoughts on this recipe? if i bump it to 4% oil, how will that affect the turn out?

KABF(100%):    424.36 g  |  14.97 oz | 0.94 lbs
Water (67%):    284.32 g  |  10.03 oz | 0.63 lbs
ADY (.4%):    1.7 g | 0.06 oz | 0 lbs | 0.45 tsp | 0.15 tbsp
Salt (2%):    8.49 g | 0.3 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.52 tsp | 0.51 tbsp
Olive Oil (2%):    8.49 g | 0.3 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.89 tsp | 0.63 tbsp
Sugar (2%):    8.49 g | 0.3 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.13 tsp | 0.71 tbsp
Total (173.4%):   735.85 g | 25.96 oz | 1.62 lbs | TF = 0.102

Also, if I'm using my steel, how would the omition of 2% sugar affect my recipe?
« Last Edit: January 05, 2013, 07:04:50 AM by mistachy »

Offline Ev

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Re: Different baking techniques...
« Reply #22 on: January 05, 2013, 07:17:41 AM »
I say go for it. You have to start somewhere and see the results to know what to change. Have you made pizza on any other baking surfaces before?

Offline mistachy

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Re: Different baking techniques...
« Reply #23 on: January 05, 2013, 07:19:23 AM »
I say go for it. You have to start somewhere and see the results to know what to change. Have you made pizza on any other baking surfaces before?
A hollow cookie sheet and an aluminum pizza pan.
ive only made 3 pizza before 1 on the cookie sheet and 2 on the pan. i really dont know what im supposed to be looking for in taste or texture

Offline mistachy

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Re: Different baking techniques...
« Reply #24 on: January 05, 2013, 07:27:58 AM »
Yes, I agree that a good stone would be better suited to the pizza he wants to make, but for some reason, that's "out of the question".
a major reason being if my stone ever broke, i would probably quit making pizza.  steel doesnt break, but that wasnt the only reason... just a major one
« Last Edit: January 05, 2013, 07:31:44 AM by mistachy »

Offline Ev

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Re: Different baking techniques...
« Reply #25 on: January 05, 2013, 10:14:55 AM »
Ok, so to make it easier for you, just getting started and all, I'd suggest a lower hydration, say about 61 or 62%.
it'll be much easier to handle and should still give you good results. Omitting the sugar may also be a good idea, as sugar can be prone to scorching, which is already going to be hard enough to avoid using steel. You may also want to start off with a lower temp, maybe around 475 with a longer bake and work your way up to the high temp, fast bake. Give it a shot and post your results and go from there. :chef:

Offline mistachy

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Re: Different baking techniques...
« Reply #26 on: January 05, 2013, 10:18:13 AM »
thanks, hoping i can bake my first pizza today have pics posted. ill cut the sugar and use 63 hydration. I have oil at 2%, im guessing that will be fine to start with

Offline Ev

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Re: Different baking techniques...
« Reply #27 on: January 05, 2013, 10:22:30 AM »
I think that'll work. Just keep an eye on the bottom of the pizza and be prepared to slide your peel under it if need be, and finish with the broiler. Good luck!

Online TXCraig1

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Re: Different baking techniques...
« Reply #28 on: January 05, 2013, 10:39:57 AM »
thanks, hoping i can bake my first pizza today have pics posted. ill cut the sugar and use 63 hydration. I have oil at 2%, im guessing that will be fine to start with

I think you might prefer your crust made with melted shortening as opposed to olive oil.

CL
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline mistachy

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Re: Different baking techniques...
« Reply #29 on: January 05, 2013, 10:41:24 AM »
I think you might prefer your crust made with melted shortening as opposed to olive oil.

CL
WHat made you reach this conclusion?


Online TXCraig1

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Re: Different baking techniques...
« Reply #30 on: January 05, 2013, 11:12:58 AM »
WHat made you reach this conclusion?

Because you like crispy GBD, and that's what it does.
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline mistachy

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Re: Different baking techniques...
« Reply #31 on: January 05, 2013, 11:33:43 AM »
Because you like crispy GBD, and that's what it does.
Crisco would you suggest? Or a different brand, im not partial to olive oil. Thanks for the recommendation

Offline mistachy

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Re: Different baking techniques...
« Reply #32 on: January 05, 2013, 11:42:55 AM »
Okay, this is what I'm rolling with, will post results.

Ingredients:
Flour (100%):
Water (63%):
ADY (.4%):
Salt (2%):
Shortening (3%):
Total (168.4%):
436.96 g  |  15.41 oz | 0.96 lbs
275.29 g  |  9.71 oz | 0.61 lbs
1.75 g | 0.06 oz | 0 lbs | 0.46 tsp | 0.15 tbsp
8.74 g | 0.31 oz | 0.02 lbs | 1.57 tsp | 0.52 tbsp
13.11 g | 0.46 oz | 0.03 lbs | 3.28 tsp | 1.09 tbsp
735.85 g | 25.96 oz | 1.62 lbs | TF = 0.102

Online TXCraig1

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Re: Different baking techniques...
« Reply #33 on: January 05, 2013, 12:11:33 PM »
Crisco would you suggest? Or a different brand, im not partial to olive oil. Thanks for the recommendation

Crisco is the best retail choice available. MFB is better but I think it's foodservice only.
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline Ev

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Re: Different baking techniques...
« Reply #34 on: January 05, 2013, 12:51:51 PM »

You might want to reduce the thickness factor to .09 or even .08, which would be more in line with the N.Y. style.

Offline mistachy

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Re: Different baking techniques...
« Reply #35 on: January 05, 2013, 01:22:34 PM »
You might want to reduce the thickness factor to .09 or even .08, which would be more in line with the N.Y. style.
I was going with more thickness so my greasy pepperoni and Italian sausage doesnt make my crust all soggy. I pile that stuff on. What do you think?

Offline Ev

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Re: Different baking techniques...
« Reply #36 on: January 05, 2013, 01:36:12 PM »
Hey, go for it! You can play with TF down the road if you need to. Just don't get discouraged if your pizza is not what you're hoping for right away. It's a journey. Enjoy the ride.

Offline shuboyje

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Re: Different baking techniques...
« Reply #37 on: January 05, 2013, 04:13:34 PM »
I'm by no means an expert on American style pizza, but it seems like this is heading in that direction.  Why not just start with Pete-Za's Papa John's clone and work back toward New York style from there?
-Jeff

Offline mistachy

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Re: Different baking techniques...
« Reply #38 on: January 05, 2013, 04:21:44 PM »
I'm by no means an expert on American style pizza, but it seems like this is heading in that direction.  Why not just start with Pete-Za's Papa John's clone and work back toward New York style from there?
I put  .1 in the calculator, 18 inches. So that's the thickness it should be right?

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Different baking techniques...
« Reply #39 on: January 05, 2013, 06:46:55 PM »
I put  .1 in the calculator, 18 inches. So that's the thickness it should be right?

DJ,

You aren't quite in Papa John's territory with what you have done so far but perhaps something between PJ territory and NY style. Just go with what you have and see how you like the results.

Peter