Author Topic: NYC Transit Strike Ruins Pizza Expedition  (Read 1379 times)

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Offline IlliniPizza

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NYC Transit Strike Ruins Pizza Expedition
« on: December 24, 2005, 10:07:56 PM »
Hi, Guys

I just got back from New York City thursday.  Monday night I ate at Grimaldi's.  Good Pizza, but a bit soggy in the middle.  Like someone mentioned earlier I should have asked for well done.

The next morning, the transit strike began.  I was unable to eat at any of the other pizza places I wanted to eat at.  With cars and cash for Yellow Cabs in short supply, I was forced to spend most of my time in the 50's shopping, and doing the Christmas thing.  I would have liked to get down to the village and hit Lombardi's & John's but didn't get the chance.  Tried to get a car service in Brooklyn to take us DiFara's, but they told us they had no cars available even though they had 3 drivers sitting in cars out front.  We got the impression that a company had commandeered their fleet for exclusive use. 

Hearing about the end of the strike on the plane ride back to Chicago was like putting the last nail in the coffin. 

No big loss.  I will just hit them next year.

One other question.  I saw a Patsy's & Angelo's, both on W. 57th st., pizza in Manhatten both claimed to have Coal Ovens, didn't go to either.  Coal ovens aren't allowed in Manhatten, are they?  Or is their a Grandfather clause for Coal fired ovens in Manhatten.



Offline canadave

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Re: NYC Transit Strike Ruins Pizza Expedition
« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2005, 11:04:56 AM »
sorry about the transit strike...that really sucks.

To answer your question, yes, some pizzerias' coal ovens are grandfathered in (i.e. Lombardi's).

Offline robtfink

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Re: NYC Transit Strike Ruins Pizza Expedition
« Reply #2 on: December 25, 2005, 04:51:49 PM »
Quite so, and, as such, according with New York City building code, remarkably there is actually a relatively newly or renewly opened coal-fired establishment (as of Spring, 2004) Luzzo's, the East Village. The premises were originally a bakery, later pizzeria; thus, the ultimate find for a dedicated (and lucky) pizzaiolo, the grail, that blessed oven.

Offline PizzaArtMan

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Re: NYC Transit Strike Ruins Pizza Expedition
« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2005, 04:48:37 PM »
[Hi there - I"ve heard that coal is the most unhealthy way to make pizza - it's toxic!! is this true? -- better to go with wood - the reason that they use coal is that years ago the guys who worked on steam ships knew how to make coal ovens - had nothing to do with making pizza - so that's how it all began - it has nothing to do with anything from italia or wood burning ovens - just one of those things but apparently Toxic and not healthy

Does anyone suggest Blodgett or Bakers Pride ovens? -- thanks!

Offline AKSteve

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Re: NYC Transit Strike Ruins Pizza Expedition
« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2005, 07:47:46 PM »
I tend to not worry about the safety of charcoal too much when I'm currently eating a pound of cheese & sausage.

That said, the charcoal I use in my grill is made from coconut shells, so I doubt it could be very toxic (hopefully). Not sure what they use in the NY ovens.

Steve

Offline robtfink

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Re: NYC Transit Strike Ruins Pizza Expedition
« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2005, 02:35:29 PM »
Hello PizzaArtMan, Welcome to the club. As unappetizingly sounding as coal-fired baking may appear to be, as far as exposing product to potential carcinogens, it may actually be less hazardous than wood, that is to say, because of the extremely high heat of a coal-fired oven, remarkably fast baking time, there is briefer exposure time; not to mention a separate firebox. Further, since at least the sixties, New York City code has specified only the burning of anthracite coal in pizza ovens (probably what had been the preferred fuel for coal-fired bakery ovens anyway). Anthracite is high carbon, low sulphur, virtually smokeless and productive of extremely high temperatures. I've no especial knowledge regarding the origin of the coal-fired oven. The story I heard was that coal was simply less expensive than firewood in metropolitain New York of the late nineteenth century - possibly imaginable in a still largely steam-powered world at the dawn of the twentieth century.   
« Last Edit: December 27, 2005, 06:48:09 PM by robtfink »