Author Topic: Dough in deep dish pan  (Read 219 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline ChefZach94

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 16
  • Location: United States
  • I Love Pizza!
Dough in deep dish pan
« on: October 13, 2014, 05:01:06 PM »
I bought a deep dish pan very similar to this one here http://www.webstaurantstore.com/16-x-2-deep-dish-pizza-pan/419TP16.html

I'm interested in cooking a pizza similar to how Little Caesar's and some of the other American style pizza places do, as in getting that golden underside of the crust. I set my pizza stone in the oven on the lowest rack and get it up to 500 degrees, then cook the pizza in the pan on top of the stone until the top of the pizza is done. However, the crust on the bottom is never fully cooked. It's white and very doughy rather than being golden, giving the fried appearance. Am I doing something wrong or did I just get the wrong type of pan?

Thanks,

Zach


Offline Qapla

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 21
Re: Dough in deep dish pan
« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2014, 08:15:51 PM »
Did you season your pan?

Did you put a small amount of oil in the bottom of the pan before you put in the dough?

How thick/thin was the dough?

You may need to provide additional information to get a comprehensive answer.

Offline Chicago Bob

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 10878
  • Location: North Carolina
  • Easy peazzy
Re: Dough in deep dish pan
« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2014, 08:57:28 PM »
Loose the stone....unless you want to pre heat it for an hour or 2.  ;)

You are a Chef?
« Last Edit: October 13, 2014, 08:59:13 PM by Chicago Bob »
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline ChefZach94

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 16
  • Location: United States
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Dough in deep dish pan
« Reply #3 on: October 13, 2014, 09:53:59 PM »
Did you season your pan?

Did you put a small amount of oil in the bottom of the pan before you put in the dough?

How thick/thin was the dough?

You may need to provide additional information to get a comprehensive answer.

I didn't season the pan, but I think I'll try that.

I put some Crisco in the bottom of the pan.

I think it was a 0.12 TF, but I'm not exactly sure.

Loose the stone....unless you want to pre heat it for an hour or 2.  ;)

You are a Chef?

I'll give that a try. It's wishful thinking, hoping to be a real pizza chef one day!

Offline Giggliato

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 241
Re: Dough in deep dish pan
« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2014, 12:59:15 AM »
When LC does their deep dish right, meaning well done its good, but I refuse to roll the dice again. In a home oven it will take about 20-30 minutes to cook your pizza, depending on a number of other things. as has been said post as much info as you can about your process from start to finish.

Offline ChefZach94

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 16
  • Location: United States
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Dough in deep dish pan
« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2014, 02:52:56 PM »
When LC does their deep dish right, meaning well done its good, but I refuse to roll the dice again. In a home oven it will take about 20-30 minutes to cook your pizza, depending on a number of other things. as has been said post as much info as you can about your process from start to finish.

16 inch, high gluten flour, 0.121 TF

Flour (100%) - 423.36 g
Water (58%) - 245.55 g
IDY (0.3%) - 1.27 g
Salt (2%) - 8.47 g
Oil (3.5%) - 14.82 g
Sugar (1%) - 4.23 g
Total (164.8%) - 697.69 g

Kneaded it and went with a 2 day cold ferment. Preheated the stone at 500 on the lowest rack for an hour, and while that was going I stretched out the dough and set it in the lightly oiled pan for the hour. When the oven was ready I put the sauce and cheese on the pizza, then set it on the stone for about 6 minutes. I then switched the oven to broil and after about 2 more minutes the pizza looked done. The top looked fantastic but the bottom looked like it had hardly been cooked and there was no crisp to it at all.

Did I go wrong in switching it to broil? Should I stop using the stone? I figured the direct contact of the stone to the pan would help with the underside of the crust but apparently it didn't do much.