Author Topic: Affect of hydration, flour type, yeast, and salt variations  (Read 1475 times)

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Offline Qarl

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Affect of hydration, flour type, yeast, and salt variations
« on: January 13, 2013, 09:50:27 AM »
This is probably a loaded question and probably not easily explained....  But let's try and break it down

Say you had a basic 5-ingredient pizza dough for a NY-style/Neopolitan pizza dough

You're baking a 2-3 minute pie in an 800 degree oven.

You start with

King Arthur bread flour 100%
Water 65%
Salt 3%
Starter poolish 5%
IDY .25%

Assume you autolyse and cold ferment for 2-4 days

Can someone generalize/summarize what happens  to the end product as you vary the percentages up and down.  I'm looking for the affects on taste, texture, oven spring, browning, micro spotting, crunchiness, and dough workability

For example what are the affects caused by...

1.  Hydration changes (lower vs. higher)
2.  Flour type changes...  Replace 50% Caputo for the KABF... Or 100% Caputo
3.  Salt percentage changes
4.  Changes in amount/types of yeast?  More poolish versus more/less IDY.  No poolish and only IDY


I imagine that this is one of those equations with thousands of variations...

For my next question, how does the sun work?


Offline chaspie

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Re: Affect of hydration, flour type, yeast, and salt variations
« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2013, 04:49:34 PM »
I see no one responded to this question, and I can't answer any of Qarl's questions either, but I was about to post a new thread to ask something similar, at least with respect to hydration. 

EDIT:  I retract the following question.  I have found that the search function of the forum returns a huge number of threads that deal with oven spring, hydration, and other factors that might affect oven spring.  And that in fact, the question of how to get improved oven spring doesn't have a simple answer.  There are so many factors involved, that each case must be analyzed indvidually.

For NY style dough recipes given on this forum that I have encountered, it seems that most of them have a hydration level ranging from about 60 to 63 percent.  Is the degree of oven spring materially affected by hydration percentage?  Is there an accepted standard hydration target range for NY style dough?
« Last Edit: March 19, 2013, 05:05:38 PM by chaspie »

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Affect of hydration, flour type, yeast, and salt variations
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2013, 06:19:46 PM »
Chuck,

You are correct that there are many factors that affect oven spring. See Reply 515 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,9908.msg104559/topicseen.html#msg104559 .

Qarl is correct that his questions have many possible answers. And they would take many pages to respond. I think I would rather tackle the question of how the sun works :-D.

Peter

Offline chaspie

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Re: Affect of hydration, flour type, yeast, and salt variations
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2013, 06:48:59 PM »
Peter, your post #515 in that thread just shows how complex it can be to isolate the critical factors to achieving improved oven spring under various circumstances.  There just is no "one size fits all" answer.  Thanks for that link.

That entire thread you pointed to is a treat to read, although I'm finding it slow going.  I can only read a few pages at a time.  Sometimes it reminds me of a fast-pasted adventure novel, and at other times I feel like I'm reading Theodore Dreiser's An American Tragedy.  Not so much for plot similarities, but more from the perspective of exhaustive descriptive detail.   ;)

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Affect of hydration, flour type, yeast, and salt variations
« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2013, 07:13:00 PM »
Chuck,

I plead guilty to the offense of providing exhaustive descriptive detail. For myself, I don't need it although I do like to memorialize it on the forum should I want to retrieve it again at a later date. Most of what I write about on the forum is for the benefit of others should they want it or need it or ask for it.

Peter
« Last Edit: March 19, 2013, 07:18:31 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline chaspie

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Re: Affect of hydration, flour type, yeast, and salt variations
« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2013, 07:35:26 PM »
Your responses are always enlightening, thorough, and truly helpful, Peter.   In fact, when I plug your name into the search function along with my keywords of interest, I tend to find the best hits. 

There is truly no better forum on the net for an aspiring home pizzaiolo. 


 

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