Author Topic: % in recipes  (Read 1239 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline PizzaMe

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 5
% in recipes
« on: January 23, 2013, 05:34:38 PM »
Can someone dumb this down for me. A lot of people who list % only in their recipes how can you turn that into grams?
I'm trying to figure this out in bakers terms but I'm having trouble.


Offline dellavecchia

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2628
Re: % in recipes
« Reply #1 on: January 23, 2013, 05:54:47 PM »
The percents of most recipes here start at 100% flour, which is the number you reference for the rest of the ingredients:

Example:

1000 grams of flour (100%)
600 grams of water (60%)
20 grams salt (2%)
2 grams IDY yeast (.2%)

Example 2:

2000 grams of flour (100%)
1200 grams of water (60%)
40 grams of salt (2%)
4 grams of IDY yeast (.2%)

As you see above, you can scale your recipe up or down using percentages.

Example 3:

I want 3 balls of dough at 400g each using the percentages above:

1200 grams total = 100% + 60% + 2% + .2% = 162.2%

That means the amount of flour is 1200g / 162.2 x 100 = 739.83g

From there you can put the rest of the recipe together:

Flour (100%) 739.83g
Water (60%) 443.9g
IDY (.2%) 1.48g
Salt (2%) 14.8g

John

Offline PizzaMe

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 5
Re: % in recipes
« Reply #2 on: January 23, 2013, 06:30:02 PM »
Okay so for instance this fellow in his thread lists: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,22893.0.html
Flour  %100
Water %61
IDY    %.25
Salt    %1.75
Oil      %1
Sugar  %1

How would you be able to figure out the grams if you do not know what 100% is? I understand no matter what whether you use 2000 or 1200 grams the ratios would all be the same. But if someones pizza looks like a great size is there a standard on the forum for 100%? 1000 grams or 2000 grams?


On a side note: What style of pizza is it that people usually oil up the bottom of the dough so it fries crispy in the pan? I can't seem to remember.

Offline mkevenson

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2271
  • Age: 63
  • Location: Santa Rosa, Ca
  • Roos! Protector of Fowl
Re: % in recipes
« Reply #3 on: January 23, 2013, 07:51:21 PM »
PizzaMe, 1st thing you need to do is figure how much flour you need for each dough ball. If you are making 1 dough ball muliply the water, say 51% x the flour weight 300grams x .51=
Salt would be say 1.5% x 300grams or .015 x 300grams=
hope that helps

mark
"Gettin' better all the time" Beatles

Offline dellavecchia

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2628
Re: % in recipes
« Reply #4 on: January 23, 2013, 08:03:28 PM »
You can ask Ev (Steve) what size his dough balls were, and what size pie he is making.

John

Offline TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 12706
  • Location: Houston, TX
Re: % in recipes
« Reply #5 on: January 23, 2013, 08:10:46 PM »
Okay so for instance this fellow in his thread lists: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,22893.0.html
Flour  %100
Water %61
IDY    %.25
Salt    %1.75
Oil      %1
Sugar  %1

How would you be able to figure out the grams if you do not know what 100% is? I understand no matter what whether you use 2000 or 1200 grams the ratios would all be the same. But if someones pizza looks like a great size is there a standard on the forum for 100%? 1000 grams or 2000 grams?


There is no standard. You would need to know or estimate the size of the dough ball. Many times people will post their dough ball weight. If not, they almost always will if you ask. If you know the dough ball weight, you can easily back into everything else. In your example above, add all the percentages together and you get 165%. Say a single dough ball weighs 300g, you divide 300 by 165%, and that will give you the flour weight in grams. 300g/165% = 181.8g. You can now multiply the flour weight (181.8g) by the other percentages to get the gram weight for the individual ingredients (you can always add everything up to check it sould sum to 300g in this example).  If you want 3 dough balls, start with 3X300g. If you want to have 3 balls and 3% extra for bowl residue, start with 3x300gx103%.

There are some other handy tools here: http://www.pizzamaking.com/dough_tools.html

Quote
On a side note: What style of pizza is it that people usually oil up the bottom of the dough so it fries crispy in the pan? I can't seem to remember.


Pan pizza. Use the search function here, and Im sure you find all sorts of things. There was also just a great deep dish post at Slice: http://slice.seriouseats.com/archives/2013/01/the-pizza-lab-the-worlds-easiest-pizza-no-knead-no-stretch-pan-pizza.html?ref=title
Pizza is not bread.


 

pizzapan