Author Topic: The truth of granite stone ?  (Read 3203 times)

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Offline Morgan

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The truth of granite stone ?
« on: January 30, 2013, 02:05:32 PM »
Someone likes the other one hates, there is also minority who are thinking it will explode and blow up your oven (maybe even whole kitchen)... :-D

Thing is that i have new baking stone for pizza and it is black granite, i ordered before i was 100% sure if its any good. It wasnt high on price so i was thinking that i just try it out, but now having little hesitation.

Stone itself is a real beauty!




Offline scott123

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Re: The truth of granite stone ?
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2013, 02:17:25 PM »
Morgan, have more hesitation ;D

Granite has no place in an oven. The molecular make-up is just not suited to the thermal shock of baking.  It probably won't explode and hurt you, but it's almost guaranteed to crack at some point.

I stopped recommending soapstone a while back, because of variations in natural rock, but I'm familiar that Finland has soapstone resources.  If you can get soapstone for very little money, that might be worth a try.  The goal is find a very white-ish veiny looking stone that has no color other than gray and white (absolutely no green or purple tinge).

Other than soapstone, there's 1/2" steel and 1/2" aluminum.  Both will get you your frozen pizza results at your 530 temps, although, without an IR thermometer to confirm, aluminum is a slightly safer bet.

Offline JD

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Re: The truth of granite stone ?
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2013, 02:23:25 PM »
Both will get you your frozen pizza results at your 530 temps, although, without an IR thermometer to confirm, aluminum is a slightly safer bet.

Are you saying this strictly based on Morgan's quest to replicate that specific frozen pizza, or are you beginning to think aluminum is superior to steel all together??
Josh

Offline scott123

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Re: The truth of granite stone ?
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2013, 02:46:13 PM »
JD, while Marc has done some trailblazing work with aluminum, I think the results are still a bit too preliminary to compare it, head to head, with steel.  Right now, my gut is telling me that although aluminum makes for an excellent baking surface, it's extreme conductivity might lend itself to slightly contrast-ier undercrusts.  For some, this additional contrast might be an advantage (a little more char/less golden brown at longer bake times) but, for others looking for a bit more traditional NY results, the contrast might need to be compensated for.  So far, it looks like compensating for the additional conductivity is most likely achievable with formula modifications, so aluminum will probably end up being very comparable to steel.

Considering that steel doesn't require these tweaks and has a much longer track record than aluminum, it's still my material of choice for ovens that can comfortably reach 530 or higher (cut in half, of course, to make it more manageable ;) ).

530, for steel, is the absolutely rock bottom for the 4 minute bake, though, and Morgan's 530 is unconfirmed, so aluminum- which is likely going to be happy at 500, is a safer bet.  Below that, though, that's completely uncharted territory.  3/4" aluminum may have the necessary mass to be happy at 475, but there's no way of knowing until someone tests it.

enter8

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Re: The truth of granite stone ?
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2013, 03:13:24 PM »
I have a small granite slab for baking bread (not pizza so much) which I found at a supermarket of all places. Had it for about a year. Never had a problem with it. No cracking at all.  My bread always comes out more brown than I ever got with a pizza stone...almost burnt in fact.   :P I'm thinking about using it to make some roman style pizza bianca soon.

edit: @Morgan - looking at your picture - looks v. v. similar to the polished side on my granite. However I bake on the rough side not the polished one.
« Last Edit: January 30, 2013, 03:15:57 PM by enter8 »

Offline JD

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Re: The truth of granite stone ?
« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2013, 03:21:03 PM »
Phew.  I thought I was using out-dated technology already... and I haven't even christened it yet!

As usual, thanks for the great info.


JD, while Marc has done some trailblazing work with aluminum, I think the results are still a bit too preliminary to compare it, head to head, with steel.  Right now, my gut is telling me that although aluminum makes for an excellent baking surface, it's extreme conductivity might lend itself to slightly contrast-ier undercrusts.  For some, this additional contrast might be an advantage (a little more char/less golden brown at longer bake times) but, for others looking for a bit more traditional NY results, the contrast might need to be compensated for.  So far, it looks like compensating for the additional conductivity is most likely achievable with formula modifications, so aluminum will probably end up being very comparable to steel.

Considering that steel doesn't require these tweaks and has a much longer track record than aluminum, it's still my material of choice for ovens that can comfortably reach 530 or higher (cut in half, of course, to make it more manageable ;) ).

530, for steel, is the absolutely rock bottom for the 4 minute bake, though, and Morgan's 530 is unconfirmed, so aluminum- which is likely going to be happy at 500, is a safer bet.  Below that, though, that's completely uncharted territory.  3/4" aluminum may have the necessary mass to be happy at 475, but there's no way of knowing until someone tests it.
Josh

Offline scott123

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Re: The truth of granite stone ?
« Reply #6 on: January 30, 2013, 03:30:45 PM »
 :-D Sorry, JD, I know you just bought the IPhone 5, but the IPhone 6 just came out and now your phone is worthless  :-D

Don't worry, you're good. The only major setback with steel is the weight, an issue that you were instrumental in mitigating.  As long you can deal with taking the plates out to bake other stuff, you've got the ideal hearth material for your oven.


Offline Morgan

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Re: The truth of granite stone ?
« Reply #7 on: January 30, 2013, 04:06:34 PM »
I bake also bread and baquettes so i have to test it sometime. Im going to bake pies too even Scott123 told me not to, im kinda rebellion :pizza:
Im using soapstone size 10x300x300mm and its really good might be even better than my real pizza stone.

Offline Morgan

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Re: The truth of granite stone ?
« Reply #8 on: February 02, 2013, 02:03:30 PM »
All i can say is that theres nothing wrong with granite, this is real good i would say. Just baked some pies (pics in ny-style).

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The truth of granite stone ?
« Reply #9 on: February 02, 2013, 02:51:48 PM »
What is the attraction of granite? What is the theory why it would be any better (or functionally different for that matter) vs a typical baking stone of a similar thickness?
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.


Offline Morgan

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Re: The truth of granite stone ?
« Reply #10 on: February 02, 2013, 03:22:09 PM »
What is the attraction of granite? What is the theory why it would be any better (or functionally different for that matter) vs a typical baking stone of a similar thickness?

There isn't one. I'm saying that it is working nicely thats all, someone are saying it dont work, but it does.
I have not been saying that its better than other stones.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The truth of granite stone ?
« Reply #11 on: February 02, 2013, 03:35:46 PM »
It doesn't surprise me that it works. Granite's thermal properties are similar to a typical pizza stone.
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.

Offline Morgan

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Re: The truth of granite stone ?
« Reply #12 on: February 02, 2013, 04:55:59 PM »
It doesn't surprise me that it works. Granite's thermal properties are similar to a typical pizza stone.

Still there seems to be lots of people who think it wont work :-D

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: The truth of granite stone ?
« Reply #13 on: February 02, 2013, 05:00:34 PM »
Still there seems to be lots of people who think it wont work :-D

Sounded to me like the question was about it breaking not whether or not it would work.
I love pigs. They convert vegetables into bacon.


 

pizzapan