Author Topic: Adding IDY to water first VS Adding IDY to flour tjem to water  (Read 1372 times)

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Offline lennyk

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Adding IDY to water first VS Adding IDY to flour tjem to water
« on: January 31, 2013, 03:19:28 AM »
I usually mix the IDY and salt with flour then add to the water(ice cold), cold rise in refridgerator.

I recently tried mixing the IDY with the water(ice cold) then adding the flour(mixed with salt).

The result was much less development, in fact after 36 hours the dough balls may have risen just slightly
and can only now see tiny bubbles.

Is this normal ?
thanks,

L


Offline La Sera

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Re: Adding IDY to water first VS Adding IDY to flour tjem to water
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2013, 09:15:22 AM »
Salt kills yeast. You should avoid having them touch directly.

It's more common to add salt to water, then add your flour and IDY. Or, you can start with flour, add your IDY and salt separately, e.g. add half flour, then salt, then other half flour, then IDY.

IDY doesn't need to be hydrated in water. You should add it with other dry ingredients.

It's always good to post your recipe with questions like this.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Adding IDY to water first VS Adding IDY to flour tjem to water
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2013, 10:54:53 AM »
La Sera,

Modern yeast strains are hardier than older strains but it is still a good idea not to subject IDY to the shock effects of cold water, which can degrade the performance of the IDY. But combining dry yeast with salt and other dry ingredients, such as in a "goody bag" mixture, will not kill the yeast. You can see Tom's comments on the goody bag in the Pizza Today article contained in Reply 7 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,7465.msg64349.html#msg64349.

As for rehydrating IDY, Tom recommends that IDY be rehydrated in warm water when a dough is to be kneaded by hand or when the total knead time will be below about five minutes. See Reply 1 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,21801.msg220619/topicseen.html#msg220619 and Reply 3 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,16360.msg160246/topicseen.html#msg160246.

Peter

Offline lennyk

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Re: Adding IDY to water first VS Adding IDY to flour tjem to water
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2013, 02:24:49 PM »
ok, reason is I have started using my DLX more and many persons recommend adding everything but the flour first to the bowl and then
adding flour bit by bit to the spinning liquid.

2 days now, the balls might be 10% if so much.
I guess this will be a super slow cold rise, lol.
« Last Edit: January 31, 2013, 02:34:08 PM by lennyk »

Online Mmmph

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Re: Adding IDY to water first VS Adding IDY to flour tjem to water
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2013, 03:57:06 PM »
I like a long cold ferment as much as the next guy, but I always work at room temp with all components of the dough.

I like to let the dough sit at room temp for at least 30 minutes before refrigerating. I just want to give the yeast a headstart before retarding the fermentation process.
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Offline patdakat345

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Re: Adding IDY to water first VS Adding IDY to flour tjem to water
« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2013, 10:15:24 AM »
I also use the DLX. All dry ingredients put in first, oil and water follows with processor running. Water at the 85 degree mark. Allow the dough to start rising for about a half hour. Refrigerate for 2 days. To me it looks as if your using of ice cold water doesn't allow fermentation to start

Pat

Offline lennyk

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Re: Adding IDY to water first VS Adding IDY to flour tjem to water
« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2013, 08:59:28 PM »
this is the first I've heard of dry ingredients going first.

Doesn't the dry stuff get all clumpy ?

I also use the DLX. All dry ingredients put in first, oil and water follows with processor running. Water at the 85 degree mark. Allow the dough to start rising for about a half hour. Refrigerate for 2 days. To me it looks as if your using of ice cold water doesn't allow fermentation to start

Pat

Offline Giggliato

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Re: Adding IDY to water first VS Adding IDY to flour tjem to water
« Reply #7 on: February 02, 2013, 09:39:30 AM »
This thread just lets us know that pizza can be all things to all people. The way you make your dough should be a reflection of yourself, which will show up in the finished pie. There is no right method for pizza making. Even our attempts at things such as styles are transitory, changing with the mutations in the genome of the wheat.

Lately I've been making a 24 hour poolish and then adding some water and salt to it, pouring the flour on top and then turning on the mixer. After a few minutes I drizzle the oil in. After a few more minutes I take the dough out and fold it on the table a few times and then ball the dough up, although it can be cut into pieces and allowed to ferment in the fridge for a few hours.

Offline patdakat345

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Re: Adding IDY to water first VS Adding IDY to flour tjem to water
« Reply #8 on: February 02, 2013, 10:10:31 AM »
this is the first I've heard of dry ingredients going first.

Doesn't the dry stuff get all clumpy ?

This is the way Italians mixed their dough for pasta for centuries and still do. Essentially, make a well in the middle of the dough, put in liquid ingredients and bring together by using your fingers.
I have tried both ways (dry first, liquid first), I prefer dry first. Even if it's a little dry, adding a teaspoon or two  of water and pulsing the blade for a few seconds, quickly brings it to the required hydration. Similarly, if it is a little too wet I can add a small amount of flour. I like the food processor using the steel blade, as I can easily do five or six dough balls in a half an hour if I pre-measure the ingredients ahead of time. I have tried other ways, by hand or using my Bosch, this works for me.

Pat