Author Topic: First Pizza Sales  (Read 1178 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline wsonner

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 128
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Mont Vernon, NH
First Pizza Sales
« on: February 03, 2013, 12:50:05 PM »
Well, this weekend I started selling my pizza to folks in town because they keep calling and insisting.  They bought and they LOVED.  Reviews are unanimous.  One guy reported that it is the best pizza in New Hampshire.  Well, here we go.  I can't keep selling out of my kitchen for long so unless I find a way to get some real equipment it will be short-lived...but fun :-).

Wes


Offline TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 12682
  • Location: Houston, TX
Re: First Pizza Sales
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2013, 01:05:17 PM »
Congratulations on your success!

Pictures?
Pizza is not bread.

Offline wsonner

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 128
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Mont Vernon, NH
Re: First Pizza Sales
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2013, 01:15:17 PM »
Congratulations on your success!

Pictures?

I didn't have time to take any last night but here is a re-post of a recent pic.

Offline scott123

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 6958
Re: First Pizza Sales
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2013, 01:20:59 PM »
Wes, congratulations. How about saving up the money you're making and using it for rent on  a small commercial space? No seating area- just the bare minimum- an oven, a sink and a table to work on- the simplicity and frugality of a mobile operation, but indoors.

Here's some more pics:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,22770.msg230953.html#msg230953

Offline TXCraig1

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 12682
  • Location: Houston, TX
Re: First Pizza Sales
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2013, 01:33:12 PM »
Sorry I missed your other post. Really great looking pies. They have a nice signature look with that golden brown - almost caramelized looking - rim.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline wsonner

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 128
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Mont Vernon, NH
Re: First Pizza Sales
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2013, 05:24:18 PM »
Wes, congratulations. How about saving up the money you're making and using it for rent on  a small commercial space? No seating area- just the bare minimum- an oven, a sink and a table to work on- the simplicity and frugality of a mobile operation, but indoors.

Here's some more pics:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,22770.msg230953.html#msg230953


That's a very good idea and one that is definitely on my short list of options.  Thank you for the ideas and encouragement!

Wes

Offline wsonner

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 128
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Mont Vernon, NH
Re: First Pizza Sales
« Reply #6 on: February 03, 2013, 05:27:27 PM »
Sorry I missed your other post. Really great looking pies. They have a nice signature look with that golden brown - almost caramelized looking - rim.

I think it makes for a much more finished look.  Thank you!

Offline Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 21986
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: First Pizza Sales
« Reply #7 on: February 03, 2013, 07:00:50 PM »
Wes,

You no doubt remember this thread: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5048.msg42759.html#msg42759. Out of curiosity, were you able to satisfy all of the requirements to be able to sell pizzas out of your home?

Peter

Offline Chicago Bob

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 10423
  • Location: North Carolina
  • Easy peazzy
Re: First Pizza Sales
« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2013, 08:09:21 PM »
Looking good Wes.
Like Peter, I too am very qurious about your situation. Your home is located within a commercial "zone", yes?
Bob
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline wsonner

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 128
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Mont Vernon, NH
Re: First Pizza Sales
« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2013, 09:58:26 PM »
Wes,

You no doubt remember this thread: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5048.msg42759.html#msg42759. Out of curiosity, were you able to satisfy all of the requirements to be able to sell pizzas out of your home?

Peter


Good question.  New  Hampshire has a new provision under its Homestead law that allows home based businesses to sell food products with greatly reduced licensing and health requirements, provided the seller does no more than $10,000 in sales per year. If I do decide to operate from my home this is the provision under which I will work until (and if) sales grow beyond the limit. For now, when people ask for pizza I'm simply asking them to cover the cost of ingredients while I'm proving the product.  Our town has very limited commercial zoning (I'm actually the chairman of the town planning board) but our zoning regulations allow for home based businesses of this type with a special exception from the ZBA.  Before going into business I will need to satisfy this requirement and any other under the Homestead law.  That said, there are a couple of other options, similar to Scott's suggestion, that would change the requirements completely and may be worth pursuing.  I'm fast approaching the point where, to operate safely and legally, I will need to dots some I's and cross some T's.

Wes


Offline shuboyje

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1110
  • Location: Detroit
Re: First Pizza Sales
« Reply #10 on: February 03, 2013, 10:13:06 PM »
Are you sure that law applies to Pizza?  I looked it up and it states you cannot product potentially hazardous foods.  That seems a little vague, but we have a similar law in Michigan that is a bit more clear in definition by stating you cannot produce foods that need any form of temperature control.  The list of potentially hazardous food examples they list leads me to believe the New Hampshire law is looking to eliminate the same type of foods and hazards as the Michigan law.

Edited to Add info from the Michigan Law:
What types of Cottage Foods can I produce in my home?   

Non-potentially hazardous foods that do not require time and/or temperature control for safety (can be safely kept at room temperature and do not require refrigeration).  Examples include: jams/jellies, breads and similar baked goods, cookies and cakes, vinegars and other non-potentially hazardous foods.  Click here for a larger list of Cottage Foods.

What are Potentially Hazardous Foods/Temperature Controlled for Safety Foods? 

A producer of Potentially Hazardous Foods/Temperature Controlled for Safety Foods (PHF/TCS) does not qualify as a cottage food operator.  "Potentially hazardous food" is defined under the 2005 Food Code and is used to classify foods that require time-temperature control (can be safely kept at room temperature and do not require refrigeration) to keep them safe for human consumption. A PHF/TCS is a food that:

 Contains moisture (water activity greater than 0.85)
 Contains protein
 Is neutral to slightly acidic ( pH between 4.6 and 7.5)
Please refer to the 2005 Food Code for pH and water activity tables.

Examples of PHF/TCS foods include:

 Meat (beef, pork, lamb)
 Poultry (chicken, turkey, duck)
 Fish
 Shellfish and crustaceans
 Eggs
 Milk and dairy products
 Cooked, plant-based foods (e.g., cooked rice, beans, or vegetables)
 Baked potatoes
 Certain synthetic ingredients
 Mushrooms
 Raw sprouts
 Tofu and soy-protein foods
 Untreated garlic and oil mixtures
« Last Edit: February 03, 2013, 10:16:50 PM by shuboyje »
-Jeff

Offline wsonner

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 128
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Mont Vernon, NH
Re: First Pizza Sales
« Reply #11 on: February 03, 2013, 10:26:43 PM »
Are you sure that law applies to Pizza?  I looked it up and it states you cannot product potentially hazardous foods.  That seems a little vague, but we have a similar law in Michigan that is a bit more clear in definition by stating you cannot produce foods that need any form of temperature control.  The list of potentially hazardous food examples they list leads me to believe the New Hampshire law is looking to eliminate the same type of foods and hazards as the Michigan law.

Edited to Add info from the Michigan Law:
What types of Cottage Foods can I produce in my home?   

Non-potentially hazardous foods that do not require time and/or temperature control for safety (can be safely kept at room temperature and do not require refrigeration).  Examples include: jams/jellies, breads and similar baked goods, cookies and cakes, vinegars and other non-potentially hazardous foods.  Click here for a larger list of Cottage Foods.

What are Potentially Hazardous Foods/Temperature Controlled for Safety Foods? 

A producer of Potentially Hazardous Foods/Temperature Controlled for Safety Foods (PHF/TCS) does not qualify as a cottage food operator.  "Potentially hazardous food" is defined under the 2005 Food Code and is used to classify foods that require time-temperature control (can be safely kept at room temperature and do not require refrigeration) to keep them safe for human consumption. A PHF/TCS is a food that:

 Contains moisture (water activity greater than 0.85)
 Contains protein
 Is neutral to slightly acidic ( pH between 4.6 and 7.5)
Please refer to the 2005 Food Code for pH and water activity tables.

Examples of PHF/TCS foods include:

 Meat (beef, pork, lamb)
 Poultry (chicken, turkey, duck)
 Fish
 Shellfish and crustaceans
 Eggs
 Milk and dairy products
 Cooked, plant-based foods (e.g., cooked rice, beans, or vegetables)
 Baked potatoes
 Certain synthetic ingredients
 Mushrooms
 Raw sprouts
 Tofu and soy-protein foods
 Untreated garlic and oil mixtures

Clearly an area of potential exposure. I'm sure it hasn't been tested yet being that the law is so new, and I'm not about to be the first to test it.  If there is any question I will have to go the traditional route.   It means more money but ultimately I'm pretty conservative and I'll make sure I do it correctly or not at all. There's too much at stake to do it otherwise. 

Offline widespreadpizza

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1220
  • Location: NH
    • my beer store opening in june 2011
Re: First Pizza Sales
« Reply #12 on: February 03, 2013, 11:04:18 PM »
Wes,  I looked into the same situation to see if I could sell out of my house and found out quickly that I could not.  Friends had been encouraging me,  so I went so far as to find out.  I am in Nashua,  low ph stuff is ok,  but not what we were looking to do.  Anyhow,  pies look great,  best of luck with everything,  look into renting a commissary at a local church on certain days of the week and operating out of there...  -Marc

Offline wsonner

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 128
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Mont Vernon, NH
Re: First Pizza Sales
« Reply #13 on: February 04, 2013, 07:09:18 AM »
Wes,  I looked into the same situation to see if I could sell out of my house and found out quickly that I could not.  Friends had been encouraging me,  so I went so far as to find out.  I am in Nashua,  low ph stuff is ok,  but not what we were looking to do.  Anyhow,  pies look great,  best of luck with everything,  look into renting a commissary at a local church on certain days of the week and operating out of there...  -Marc

Another good idea.  Thanks Marc!  Nice to have a So. NH friend here :-).

Wes


 

pizzapan