Author Topic: Buying vs Making Mozzarella; Cost and Time implications  (Read 7853 times)

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Offline hotsawce

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Buying vs Making Mozzarella; Cost and Time implications
« on: February 07, 2013, 02:39:26 PM »
Interested in knowing if anyone has input on buying vs. making fresh mozzarella in a commercial setting.

Trying to get a ballpark idea of any cost benefits or detriments (IE, cost of buying and storing premade mozzarella VS cost of buying raw ingredients + cost of labor/time to process into fresh mozzarella.)

My reason for asking is I've had truly fresh mozzarella on a pizza that was noticeably better than a refrigerated "fresh" mozzarella I've had.


Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Buying vs Making Mozzarella; Cost and Time implications
« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2013, 07:27:28 PM »
Another option would be to buy freshly made mozzarella from a company that makes it, if available in your area. If you are buying on a regular basis in bulk you might even be able to ask for specific salt levels, ball size, etc. No need for long term storage since it could be delivered daily.

John
« Last Edit: February 07, 2013, 07:29:15 PM by dellavecchia »

Online thezaman

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Re: Buying vs Making Mozzarella; Cost and Time implications
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2013, 08:12:24 PM »
 if you mean from cured. the savings is about 70 cents per pound.we make 20 pounds in one hour. average wage is 14.00 then it is a break even. after you asking this question i may start buying grande fresh mozzarella and forget stretching it!!!

Offline La Sera

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Re: Buying vs Making Mozzarella; Cost and Time implications
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2013, 09:42:49 PM »
Can your average customer tell the difference between the two?
Are you going to charge a premium for it?
Is it going to be a central part of your marketing?
Do you expect an incremental increase in sales from it?

If the answers are no, then I would say you could spend your money, time and energy better on marketing.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2013, 10:23:25 PM by La Sera »

Offline hotsawce

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Re: Buying vs Making Mozzarella; Cost and Time implications
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2013, 04:54:25 PM »
Not at all related to the question I asked but thanks for being a jerk  ::) Let me worry about my business model, thanks.

Can your average customer tell the difference between the two?
Are you going to charge a premium for it?
Is it going to be a central part of your marketing?
Do you expect an incremental increase in sales from it?

If the answers are no, then I would say you could spend your money, time and energy better on marketing.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2013, 04:57:34 PM by hotsawce »

Offline hotsawce

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Re: Buying vs Making Mozzarella; Cost and Time implications
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2013, 04:56:54 PM »
Should I eventually open a place, something I've certainly thought about. But that's assuming there's a supplier that is local and makes great mozz. But how long would a fresh delivery keep at room temp before getting strange? A dinner service? A dinner and brunch service?

Another option would be to buy freshly made mozzarella from a company that makes it, if available in your area. If you are buying on a regular basis in bulk you might even be able to ask for specific salt levels, ball size, etc. No need for long term storage since it could be delivered daily.

John

Offline hotsawce

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Re: Buying vs Making Mozzarella; Cost and Time implications
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2013, 04:58:46 PM »
So if I'm understanding you correctly, the price ends up being the same, just more of a hassle to make it?

if you mean from cured. the savings is about 70 cents per pound.we make 20 pounds in one hour. average wage is 14.00 then it is a break even. after you asking this question i may start buying grande fresh mozzarella and forget stretching it!!!

Offline Tscarborough

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Re: Buying vs Making Mozzarella; Cost and Time implications
« Reply #7 on: February 08, 2013, 08:36:58 PM »
Cost VS time is not the real question.  It is faster and cheaper to buy frozen doughballs, for example.  The real question, as stated by La Sera, is if fresh mozzarella is something you want to do as a feature or a way to save money?  It is doubtful you will save money or time by making good dough, fresh mozzarella or sourcing local produce, but unless you plan on using minimum wage workers with a conveyor oven, then the extra cost and time should simply be accounted for and marketed as such to differentiate your business from the common run of fast food.

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Buying vs Making Mozzarella; Cost and Time implications
« Reply #8 on: February 08, 2013, 09:05:41 PM »
Not at all related to the question I asked but thanks for being a jerk  ::) Let me worry about my business model, thanks.


Actually, those questions posed are very relevant if you are truly looking into commercial mozz priorities. I find it odd you would call La Sera a "jerk" for contributing to your question. I would say post in the general threads and not in Shop Talk if you are not truly interested in commercial conversation.

John

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Buying vs Making Mozzarella; Cost and Time implications
« Reply #9 on: February 08, 2013, 09:16:04 PM »
Not at all related to the question I asked but thanks for being a jerk  ::) Let me worry about my business model, thanks.


Wow. That response was way out of line.  ???
Pizza is not bread.


Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Buying vs Making Mozzarella; Cost and Time implications
« Reply #10 on: February 08, 2013, 09:21:01 PM »
But how long would a fresh delivery keep at room temp before getting strange? A dinner service? A dinner and brunch service?

So you are keeping your product at room temp? Are you opening this restaurant in the US?

John

Offline hotsawce

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Re: Buying vs Making Mozzarella; Cost and Time implications
« Reply #11 on: February 09, 2013, 12:02:38 AM »
No. The thread has already derailed, and it's exactly what I wanted to avoid. I am not looking for propositions on how to market a product using house made mozz, nor do I want advice on where someone here believes it would be best to put my "time and energy."

I was only asking for the experience of those that have used or have knowledge of both methods in a commercial setting....not advice on how to run a business.

This is the same poster that's already written about how he's annoyed he can't get people in his location to purchase his "high quality product." La Sera may have had a bad experience, but I don't think this thread isn't the place to project that.

Wow. That response was way out of line.  ???
« Last Edit: February 09, 2013, 12:06:11 AM by hotsawce »

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Buying vs Making Mozzarella; Cost and Time implications
« Reply #12 on: February 09, 2013, 12:36:10 AM »
Should I eventually open a place, something I've certainly thought about.

The market probably will have greatly changed by then,   come back when you.....are ready.
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline deb415611

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Re: Buying vs Making Mozzarella; Cost and Time implications
« Reply #13 on: February 09, 2013, 07:55:29 AM »
No. The thread has already derailed, and it's exactly what I wanted to avoid. I am not looking for propositions on how to market a product using house made mozz, nor do I want advice on where someone here believes it would be best to put my "time and energy."

I was only asking for the experience of those that have used or have knowledge of both methods in a commercial setting....not advice on how to run a business.

This is the same poster that's already written about how he's annoyed he can't get people in his location to purchase his "high quality product." La Sera may have had a bad experience, but I don't think this thread isn't the place to project that.


as Craig said your post was way out of line,  you didn't have to call La Sera a jerk, you could have simply said thanks but I am only interested in cost and time implications.   People are trying to help.   

Offline Steveinid

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Re: Buying vs Making Mozzarella; Cost and Time implications
« Reply #14 on: February 09, 2013, 12:25:38 PM »
I saw this thread and thought it would be an interesting read since this question is one I have wanted to explore.

Cost wise, is it worth it to make mozzarella vs. buying it?

I have to sympathize with Hotsawce. Calling someone a jerk is probably out of line but I have read so many threads on different forums where a person asks a simple question and the answers, although helpful in someway, don't really answer the question.

Zaman says he makes his but it is a "break even". That is the only information I got out of all the posts.

Marketing, customer satisfaction etc. are all variables to consider but the only variable Hotsawce is asking about in his thread is the cost of production. I'm sure all other variables are being considered but this variable is one he is unsure of.

It is frustrating for Hotsawce as it is for me who also wants to know just one thing: What are the pros and cons of making your own mozzarella when it comes to costs?

Offline dellavecchia

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Re: Buying vs Making Mozzarella; Cost and Time implications
« Reply #15 on: February 09, 2013, 12:42:58 PM »
It is frustrating for Hotsawce as it is for me who also wants to know just one thing: What are the pros and cons of making your own mozzarella when it comes to costs?

I would urge you re-read the answers that I, La Sera, and thezaman gave. If you feel those answers are not good enough, you may want to try asking your question at the Think Tank over at pmq.com.

John

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Buying vs Making Mozzarella; Cost and Time implications
« Reply #16 on: February 09, 2013, 03:12:51 PM »
I saw this thread and thought it would be an interesting read since this question is one I have wanted to explore.

Cost wise, is it worth it to make mozzarella vs. buying it?

I have to sympathize with Hotsawce. Calling someone a jerk is probably out of line but I have read so many threads on different forums where a person asks a simple question and the answers, although helpful in someway, don't really answer the question.

Zaman says he makes his but it is a "break even". That is the only information I got out of all the posts.

Marketing, customer satisfaction etc. are all variables to consider but the only variable Hotsawce is asking about in his thread is the cost of production. I'm sure all other variables are being considered but this variable is one he is unsure of.

It is frustrating for Hotsawce as it is for me who also wants to know just one thing: What are the pros and cons of making your own mozzarella when it comes to costs?

Cost, in the cash sense, is objective and easily quantifiable (in this case anyway). It doesnít have pros and cons. It is what it is. And just because it is $X for one person, doesnít mean it is $X for you. What makes you think Larryís (thezaman) costs are the same as yours? So what did you really get out of that post?

The pros and cons of cost relate more to opportunity costs, in particular the ones that are difficult to quantify. Marketing, customer satisfaction, etc. are part and parcel with the intangible costs. La Saraís answer, as I read it, was trying to point this out.

The answer you want may not always be the answer you need; how can it hurt to listen and keep an open mind?
Pizza is not bread.

Offline cnkymnky

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Re: Buying vs Making Mozzarella; Cost and Time implications
« Reply #17 on: February 09, 2013, 03:17:56 PM »
had a response in mind to ad to this conversation, but after reading everything above, i think i shall pass on this one....too bad

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Buying vs Making Mozzarella; Cost and Time implications
« Reply #18 on: February 09, 2013, 03:28:03 PM »


The answer you want may not always be the answer you need; how can it hurt to listen and keep an open mind?

Asking a question here doesn't guarantee anything....
Answering a question here without malicious intent should guarantee you won't be called a name.
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Buying vs Making Mozzarella; Cost and Time implications
« Reply #19 on: February 09, 2013, 03:40:57 PM »
No. The thread has already derailed, and it's exactly what I wanted to avoid. I am not looking for propositions on how to market a product using house made mozz, nor do I want advice on where someone here believes it would be best to put my "time and energy."

I was only asking for the experience of those that have used or have knowledge of both methods in a commercial setting....not advice on how to run a business.

This is the same poster that's already written about how he's annoyed he can't get people in his location to purchase his "high quality product." La Sera may have had a bad experience, but I don't think this thread isn't the place to project that.


When I read your initial post, the first thing to pass through my mind was how bloody good was the fresh mozzarella that Josh (Pieous in Austin, TX) made for us at Tomís house a couple months ago. Like many folks here, Iíve thought seriously about opening a pizzeria, and immediately I was thinking about if this was something Iíd do in my place if I opened one. The questions I considered were similar to what La Sara posed to you. Since the cash cost is so simple to calculate Ė and varies from place to place, I didnít even think about answering along those lines. I was however going to give you an answer similar to La Saraís until I saw that he had already done so.  Iím now very glad that I didnít as I hate to think how I would have responded if you called me a jerk.

Good luck the next time you ask for help.
Pizza is not bread.