Author Topic: Whole Wheat Flour  (Read 973 times)

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Offline wsonner

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Whole Wheat Flour
« on: February 18, 2013, 11:48:24 AM »
My current dough recipe uses KA AP flour.  People are asking for whole wheat and I was wondering what the complexity might be in switching out AP for whole wheat.  Is it a simple swap or do I need to adjust the recipe?

Wes


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Re: Whole Wheat Flour
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2013, 12:37:54 PM »
Wes;
It's pretty easy, but you do need to make a couple of changes.
The whole wheat flour will carry more water than your regular white flour. You will need to experiment to find the exact amount of extra water to add, but for starters, I'd recommend adding 8 to 10% more water. Since the whole wheat flour is slower to hydrate than white flour I suggest using a "soaker". To do this, put the whole wheat flour in a suitably sized container, and add the full amount of water to the flour, stir until the consistency of wet oatmeal (it should look sloppy). Set aside and allow to hydrate for at least 1-hour. More time won't hurt it. I have even put it in the fridge to hydrate overnight for use on the following day. Transfer the soaker to your mixing bowl and add the remainder of ingredients and mix just until the dough comes smooth and springy to the touch. From that point on, you should be able to manage the dough in your normal manner. Keep in mind that whole wheat doughs do not hold up very well for more than about a day in the fridge after it has been mixed as a dough. Some ideas for consideration:
1) Use butter as your source of fat.
2) Use 3% NONDIASTATIC malt syrup to replace any sugar in the dough recipe/formula.
3) After opening the dough into a pizza skin, wet the edge of the dough with a little water and sprinkle the edge only with some sesame seeds. The flavor compliments the whole wheat.
4) If you can find whole white wheat flour give it a try since the flavor is better than the flavor of whole wheat flour made from a dark red wheat variety.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline wsonner

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Re: Whole Wheat Flour
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2013, 12:42:18 PM »
Wes;
It's pretty easy, but you do need to make a couple of changes.
The whole wheat flour will carry more water than your regular white flour. You will need to experiment to find the exact amount of extra water to add, but for starters, I'd recommend adding 8 to 10% more water. Since the whole wheat flour is slower to hydrate than white flour I suggest using a "soaker". To do this, put the whole wheat flour in a suitably sized container, and add the full amount of water to the flour, stir until the consistency of wet oatmeal (it should look sloppy). Set aside and allow to hydrate for at least 1-hour. More time won't hurt it. I have even put it in the fridge to hydrate overnight for use on the following day. Transfer the soaker to your mixing bowl and add the remainder of ingredients and mix just until the dough comes smooth and springy to the touch. From that point on, you should be able to manage the dough in your normal manner. Keep in mind that whole wheat doughs do not hold up very well for more than about a day in the fridge after it has been mixed as a dough. Some ideas for consideration:
1) Use butter as your source of fat.
2) Use 3% NONDIASTATIC malt syrup to replace any sugar in the dough recipe/formula.
3) After opening the dough into a pizza skin, wet the edge of the dough with a little water and sprinkle the edge only with some sesame seeds. The flavor compliments the whole wheat.
4) If you can find whole white wheat flour give it a try since the flavor is better than the flavor of whole wheat flour made from a dark red wheat variety.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor



Exactly what I was looking for. Thank you Tom. 

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Re: Whole Wheat Flour
« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2013, 12:47:29 PM »
Wes;
It's pretty easy, but you do need to make a couple of changes.
The whole wheat flour will carry more water than your regular white flour. You will need to experiment to find the exact amount of extra water to add, but for starters, I'd recommend adding 8 to 10% more water. Since the whole wheat flour is slower to hydrate than white flour I suggest using a "soaker". To do this, put the whole wheat flour in a suitably sized container, and add the full amount of water to the flour, stir until the consistency of wet oatmeal (it should look sloppy). Set aside and allow to hydrate for at least 1-hour. More time won't hurt it. I have even put it in the fridge to hydrate overnight for use on the following day. Transfer the soaker to your mixing bowl and add the remainder of ingredients and mix just until the dough comes smooth and springy to the touch. From that point on, you should be able to manage the dough in your normal manner. Keep in mind that whole wheat doughs do not hold up very well for more than about a day in the fridge after it has been mixed as a dough. Some ideas for consideration:
1) Use butter as your source of fat.
2) Use 3% NONDIASTATIC malt syrup to replace any sugar in the dough recipe/formula.
3) After opening the dough into a pizza skin, wet the edge of the dough with a little water and sprinkle the edge only with some sesame seeds. The flavor compliments the whole wheat.
4) If you can find whole white wheat flour give it a try since the flavor is better than the flavor of whole wheat flour made from a dark red wheat variety.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Tom,
For the soaker do you use the full amount of flour to the total formula water?
Thanks
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