Author Topic: My 2.5 hour pizza...  (Read 612 times)

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Offline DavePZ

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My 2.5 hour pizza...
« on: February 15, 2013, 11:39:29 AM »
So, last night, my lovely wife decided she wanted one of my pizzas. :chef:
The problem was, I had no dough in the fridge.
So I decided to give a ‘quick dough’ a shot.
I had 2-1/2 hours to make it.
So, I read the thread on Emergency Dough’s, to get ideas, and decided to sort-of experiment…

I have to say that the crust flavor was not great (sort-of bland, which was expected), but the crust looked and felt awesome. Texture was great, nice and crisp on bottom, rim had perfect consistency and crisp (for me), etc.
I would love to have any ideas on how to improve upon the flavor for a quick dough like this…using a starter.
 
So here is how I did it.
I have a nice sour dough starter, which has been on the counter for a few days, and I have been feeding every day.

I did the following:
- Mix starter into itself, and then pour 1 cup starter into a glass bowl. (starter has been fed with AP flour)
- Add 1 cup room temp water
- Mix for 20 seconds.
- Add 2 cups KABF (sifted), 2 TBSP of IDY, 1 TBSP of White Sugar, 0.5 tsp salt, 2 TBSP of VWG.
- Mixed till incorporated
- Let rest 10 minutes
- Kept adding KABF until got a consistency I wanted, which was something I would estimate as 70% Hydration (based on my limited experience)
- Add 2 TBSP of Olive Oil (fairly strong flavor oil), and kneed into dough.
- Kneed for about 6 minutes.
- Broke dough into 2 balls, and put both in bowls, and set on counter.
- Air temp in room was about 72F.
- Let rise for 2 hours. They seems to rise about 50%.
- Punched down, and fold over.
- Rise for an additional 30 minutes. Rose nicely in 30 minutes.

- I had preheated oven for an hour at 550F. The oven I have is one of those split ovens, so the top oven is only about 9 inches tall, and has heating elements on both top and bottom. I preheated the small oven with pizza stone for 1 hour.
- Stretched skin onto pizza screen.
- topped with Mozz and Mild Provolone cheese. Dabbled sauce on top.
- Cooked for few  minutes till I could slide off screen onto stone
- Switched to broil for 2 minutes, and then back to bake.
- not sure of exact bake time.

The pizza was one of my best ever (although that is not say much, since I am inexperienced), but funny how my best so far, was a quick dough.

Here are the photos, and I would love any one to critique the method. Did I do anything that does not make sense, and may have hurt me? (like adding VWG, Too little salt, not enough kneeding, etc, etc.)

Just trying to figure out how I can improve.

Thanks!!
Dave


Offline TXCraig1

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Re: My 2.5 hour pizza...
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2013, 11:55:14 AM »
You are not going to develop much, if any, flavor in 2.5 hours. Whatever flavor you have is going to come in with your culture. You might try feeding it a few times over a couple days without discarding any to get some good mature flavor.

Where did your culture come from?
Pizza is not bread.

Offline DavePZ

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Re: My 2.5 hour pizza...
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2013, 12:05:16 PM »
I ordered the "Italian" one from sourdo dot com.
I forget the exact name.
Thanks!

Offline TXCraig1

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  • Location: Houston, TX
Re: My 2.5 hour pizza...
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2013, 12:21:04 PM »
Neither of the Italian cultures from sourdo will give you much "sour" flavor unless you really give them a lot of time (3+ days) under optimal conditions for developing sour flavor. I don't think this is a bad thing. I don't want "sour" in my pizza. I use the Ischia culture (one of the two from sourdo), and it will develop loads of flavor - just not "sour." I've found the key to this culture to use a small amount (about 1.5-2% of your flour weight) and ferment 48 hours at about 63-65F.

I think for a very short rise like 2.5 hours, your best bet is to let your culture get very mature. Feed it a couple times without discarding any, and then let it rise up and fall down before using it (but don't wait too long after it falls all the way down - you still want it to be fully active). Develop as much flavor as you can in the culture and carry that flavor over to the dough.
Pizza is not bread.

Offline DavePZ

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Re: My 2.5 hour pizza...
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2013, 12:24:58 PM »
That makes sense. Im going to give that a try, and see how it differs from this first one.
Thanks much!
Dave


 

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