Author Topic: bfguilford does Fazzari  (Read 7765 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline corkd

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 261
  • Location: syracuse, ny
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: bfguilford does Fazzari
« Reply #60 on: August 17, 2013, 11:04:00 PM »
That peppadew pie looks great! Beautiful crust as well. I noted what you said about spraying the part skim mozz with oil.. I used some last week along with some uncured bacon, & the bacon fat really helped the cheese out....


Offline bfguilford

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 619
  • Location: Near New Haven, CT
Re: bfguilford does Fazzari
« Reply #61 on: August 18, 2013, 10:03:45 AM »
Thanks Needssalt and corkd.

@corkd: Scott123 turned me on to using oil to help the part-skim cheese melt, and as usual, his advice was great. I'm sure that bacon fat helps... probably more (but I don't eat meat, so I'll never find out).

Barry
Light travels faster than sound. That's why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.

Offline fazzari

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 903
Re: bfguilford does Fazzari
« Reply #62 on: August 20, 2013, 10:36:00 PM »


Here's tonight's bake. Launched at 700 in the Blackstone and went for 3:00 on the nose. The increase in temperature meant that I got the additional bit of char that was missing (for me, John, not for you :D) in last night's bake. The texture was more what I've become used to with this recipe. Crust was light and pillow-y inside a nice eggshell crunch (more like what I was getting indoors on the soapstone). The Blackstone certainly works for this style pie.

Barry
Barry,
Lest you think I don't enjoy a little char, I have a two stone that I use to bake my experimental neapolitans on....and I think the char is just fine for those.
Here's a little experiment I did just for you......I'm using basically the same recipe as you except my flour is All Trumps.  All week I have been baking pizzas in the 580 to 600 degree range and they have been excellent.  Today, I decided to try one in a cooler oven.
This dough has been in the fridge 144 hours.  It was reballed about 12 hours prior to bake....and it was baked in a cool 545 degree oven.  Believe it or not, it took 8 minutes and 10 seconds to get this thing the color I wanted.  It got rave reviews from all my critics here, and I seconded their opinions.  The brownness (is that a word?) of the bottom adds a level of flavor to the crust that we all seriously love here.  And by the way, even with the long bake, we enjoyed the egg shell thin, crispiness bottom that was as tender as I've experienced.  For what it's worth, the texture has more to do with the reball, than the temperature of the oven.  Keep experimenting Barry...it's all good eats!!

John


Offline bfguilford

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 619
  • Location: Near New Haven, CT
Re: bfguilford does Fazzari
« Reply #63 on: August 20, 2013, 10:44:53 PM »
That's just flat out beautiful, John. 6 day dough... I was wondering how far you could push it. Was that all in bulk until the last 12 hours? For you, 545 is a cool oven. For me, that's all I can get on a good day from my home oven. I'm trying to imagine what an 8+ minute bake would look like in my oven... much darker I think. Is the All Trumps malted?

I'm going to continue to experiment for sure. You inspire me!

Barry
Light travels faster than sound. That's why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.

Offline fazzari

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 903
Re: bfguilford does Fazzari
« Reply #64 on: August 21, 2013, 03:04:48 PM »
That's just flat out beautiful, John. 6 day dough... I was wondering how far you could push it. Was that all in bulk until the last 12 hours? For you, 545 is a cool oven. For me, that's all I can get on a good day from my home oven. I'm trying to imagine what an 8+ minute bake would look like in my oven... much darker I think. Is the All Trumps malted?
This week I scaled and balled everything before refrigerating.  Barry, it's not the temperature of my ovens that was important in this experiment, it was the relative differences in the temperatures I used which caused much differing baking times.  When I am baking, if the bottom browns too fast, I throw a screen under it to slow it down to catch up to the top.  All Trumps is malted.

John

Offline JD

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1315
  • Location: NE Mississippi, but NY born & raised
Re: bfguilford does Fazzari
« Reply #65 on: August 21, 2013, 03:08:35 PM »
John/Barry,

If you are reballing a lower hydration dough, do you have any problem opening the skin in a consistent manner (thin or thick spots)?

Josh

scott123

  • Guest
Re: bfguilford does Fazzari
« Reply #66 on: August 21, 2013, 03:15:21 PM »
John/Barry,

If you are reballing a lower hydration dough, do you have any problem opening the skin in a consistent manner (thin or thick spots)?

I'm not John or Barry, but I have major problems re-balling low relative hydration (as relating to absorption value) doughs. If I can't pinch the re-ball completely shut, forget a good stretch. I do oil my initial balls, though, so maybe using less oil or no oil might help in this regard.

Offline bfguilford

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 619
  • Location: Near New Haven, CT
Re: bfguilford does Fazzari
« Reply #67 on: August 21, 2013, 03:58:19 PM »
John/Barry,

If you are reballing a lower hydration dough, do you have any problem opening the skin in a consistent manner (thin or thick spots)?

Sorry JD. I don't know because I've never tried.

I'm not John or Barry, but I have major problems re-balling low relative hydration (as relating to absorption value) doughs. If I can't pinch the re-ball completely shut, forget a good stretch. I do oil my initial balls, though, so maybe using less oil or no oil might help in this regard.

I use oil as well, and imagine that it would make it pretty difficult, if not impossible to pinch the reballed dough shut completely.

John: Do you oil yours?

Barry
« Last Edit: August 21, 2013, 04:00:13 PM by bfguilford »
Light travels faster than sound. That's why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.

Offline bfguilford

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 619
  • Location: Near New Haven, CT
Re: bfguilford does Fazzari
« Reply #68 on: August 21, 2013, 04:02:47 PM »
This week I scaled and balled everything before refrigerating.  Barry, it's not the temperature of my ovens that was important in this experiment, it was the relative differences in the temperatures I used which caused much differing baking times.  When I am baking, if the bottom browns too fast, I throw a screen under it to slow it down to catch up to the top.  All Trumps is malted.

John

OK, I understand what you're driving at. I've never tried to use a screen to slow the bottom down because, as you pointed out a while back,  I've always been in a hurry :-D and hit it with the broiler to speed up the top browning.

Barry
Light travels faster than sound. That's why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.

Offline JD

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1315
  • Location: NE Mississippi, but NY born & raised
Re: bfguilford does Fazzari
« Reply #69 on: August 21, 2013, 05:50:58 PM »
I'm not John or Barry, but I have major problems re-balling low relative hydration (as relating to absorption value) doughs. If I can't pinch the re-ball completely shut, forget a good stretch. I do oil my initial balls, though, so maybe using less oil or no oil might help in this regard.

I'm learning this the hard way I believe. I was able to pinch the bottom shut last night, but I have a feeling it will still be lumpy tonight when I try to open it. It is a 63% All-trumps dough with only 1.5% oil. Last week I did a 66% AT and I had no issues at all re-balling.

I really love what re-balling does to the final product, but I believe there is a fine line (based on hydration) where it starts to create other issues.
Josh


Offline fazzari

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 903
Re: bfguilford does Fazzari
« Reply #70 on: August 21, 2013, 07:42:25 PM »
I'm not John or Barry, but I have major problems re-balling low relative hydration (as relating to absorption value) doughs. If I can't pinch the re-ball completely shut, forget a good stretch. I do oil my initial balls, though, so maybe using less oil or no oil might help in this regard.
There really is a fine line in absorption rates which makes this process easier.  Now, having said that, I've changed my methods over time....now I make the very top of the dough ball (as seen from the container), the interior of my new ball, pulling the soft oily dough from the bottom around the top.  This seems to make the process easier.
But one final important point, as has been noted before....this dough just isn't meant to be extremely thin (too thin a dough seems to take away all of the good characteristics which make it different from other doughs...so, it really isn't a New York style dough).  The only reason I mention this is that even when I can't get a reball completely closed using this dough, it doesn't do a lot of harm because I'm not trying to get to a .85 thickness.  I'm happy with a little bit thicker pizza and that little bit of thickness helps hide whatever flaws are there.
John

Offline bfguilford

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 619
  • Location: Near New Haven, CT
Re: bfguilford does Fazzari
« Reply #71 on: May 24, 2014, 09:23:20 PM »
Well... I've been away for a long time, initially because of a crazy work schedule that was keeping me out of town 3-4 days a week (thankfully, that's over... I'm down to one day a week now) and then because of health issues at home (my wife is now on the mend 5 weeks after major surgery).

I finally had the time to put together a Fazzari dough.

Dough
Flour: 15% organic KA white whole wheat; 85% organic KABF
Water: 64%
IDY: 0.4%
Salt: 2.25%
Oil: 1.5%
Sugar: 1.5%

Poolish made of 40% of flour at 50% hydration

Normal procedure from earlier in thread, with a 3 day cold ferment, 2.5 hours at room temp. Fired up the very lonely looking Blackstone. Bottom stone at approx 600 and top stone at approx 725 for first pie - a white margherita (garlic, basil, tomatoes, mozz and a spray of EVOOw ,with peppadews on half).. That came out a little uneven, with the bottom pretty pale. It was tasty though - declared by the 13-year-old critic and wife.

Balanced the heat better for the second pie (garlic, basil, broccoli, mozz and a spray of EVOO, again with peppadews on half). Much better browning and char on the bottom, and even tastier I was told.

Third pie was half garlic, mozz and basil and half everything else that was left over. Also balanced better.

Dough handling skills are rusty, to say the least, but they started to come back a bit. It's good to be back with friends, and I'll be participating more regularly again, now that my life is back to what passes for normal around here.

We finally planted some tomatoes, basil, chard, kale, etc. in our community garden plot last weekend, and the garlic is looking good. I can't wait to be able to work with produce that tasted like something after a very long New England winter and cold spring.

Barry
« Last Edit: May 24, 2014, 09:26:46 PM by bfguilford »
Light travels faster than sound. That's why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.

Online Chicago Bob

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 11096
  • Location: Durham,NC
  • Easy peazzy
Re: bfguilford does Fazzari
« Reply #72 on: May 24, 2014, 09:33:05 PM »
Well... I've been away for a long time, initially because of a crazy work schedule that was keeping me out of town 3-4 days a week (thankfully, that's over... I'm down to one day a week now) and then because of health issues at home (my wife is now on the mend 5 weeks after major surgery).

I finally had the time to put together a Fazzari dough.

Dough
Flour: 15% organic KA white whole wheat; 85% organic KABF
Water: 64%
IDY: 0.4%
Salt: 2.25%
Oil: 1.5%
Sugar: 1.5%

Poolish made of 40% of flour at 50% hydration

Normal procedure from earlier in thread, with a 3 day cold ferment, 2.5 hours at room temp. Fired up the very lonely looking Blackstone. Bottom stone at approx 600 and top stone at approx 725 for first pie - a white margherita (garlic, basil, tomatoes, mozz and a spray of EVOOw ,with peppadews on half).. That came out a little uneven, with the bottom pretty pale. It was tasty though - declared by the 13-year-old critic and wife.

Balanced the heat better for the second pie (garlic, basil, broccoli, mozz and a spray of EVOO, again with peppadews on half). Much better browning and char on the bottom, and even tastier I was told.

Third pie was half garlic, mozz and basil and half everything else that was left over. Also balanced better.

Dough handling skills are rusty, to say the least, but they started to come back a bit. It's good to be back with friends, and I'll be participating more regularly again, now that my life is back to what passes for normal around here.

We finally planted some tomatoes, basil, chard, kale, etc. in our community garden plot last weekend, and the garlic is looking good. I can't wait to be able to work with produce that tasted like something after a very long New England winter and cold spring.

Barry
Most excellent post and faaaantastic looking pies Barry.
Glad you are back in the saddle man!

CB
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

Offline norma427

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 22451
  • Location: Lancaster County, Pa.
    • learningknowledgetomakepizza
Re: bfguilford does Fazzari
« Reply #73 on: May 25, 2014, 05:46:25 AM »
Barry,

Glad to see you back on the forum.  I agree, your pies look delicious!

Norma
Always working and looking for new information!

Offline deb415611

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1070
  • Location: CT
Re: bfguilford does Fazzari
« Reply #74 on: May 25, 2014, 07:16:43 AM »
pies look great!   I was driving through Guilford a few weeks ago and was wondering where you were, good to see you back and good that your wife is on the mend.

Offline bfguilford

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 619
  • Location: Near New Haven, CT
Re: bfguilford does Fazzari
« Reply #75 on: June 01, 2014, 09:49:01 PM »
Most excellent post and faaaantastic looking pies Barry.
Glad you are back in the saddle man!

CB

Glad to see you back on the forum.  I agree, your pies look delicious!

Norma

pies look great!   I was driving through Guilford a few weeks ago and was wondering where you were, good to see you back and good that your wife is on the mend.

Thanks Bob, Norma and Deb. It's really good to be back.

This week, I made a small change to the recipe (upped the EVOO to 2.25%) and extended the cold fermentation to 6 days. I would have been better off leaving well enough alone. The extra .75 percent EVOO was noticeable in taste (and not in a good way) and the texture of the dough seemed to take a bit of a hit as well. Not sure if it was the EVOO or the extra 2 days fermentation, but the dough was more fragile (for lack of a better word) and I needed to handle it with way more care. I managed to tear a pretty big hole in the third skin. Not a pretty sight.

I used pesto as a base tonight and that tasted good according to 13-year-old critic and my wife. The only issue was that it saturated the last skin a little and caused it to stick to the peel. Mad scramble for dental floss to try to unstick it, and it made for an interesting shaped pie - no mistaking that pie for something that came from the local pizza joint! 13-year-old critic said that it looked heart shaped to him. Hard to argue with that.

I think I may try a Glutenboy dough next time - it's been a while and I'd like to see how that goes in the Blackstone.

Barry

Light travels faster than sound. That's why some people appear bright until you hear them speak.